NON-WOOD FOREST PRODUCTS
Working Document No.7

 

The role of cites in controlling the
international trade in forest products

Implications for sustainable forest management

by
Teresa Mulliken
TRAFFIC INTERNATIONAL

 

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2009

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned.

To receive copies of this document, please contact:
Non-Wood News Forest Products and Industries Division
FAO Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome Italy
Email: non-wood-news@fao.org non-wood-news@fao.org
This document is available from the NWFP home page at: www.fao.org/forestry/nwfp/en/ All comments and suggestions are welcomed.


Table of Contents

(Download the Complete document- 692 Kb)

Acknowledgements
Executive Summary

INTRODUCTION

1. CITES BASICS—A GUIDE TO THE CONVENTION

Establishment and purpose of CITES

Membership of CITES

How CITES works: the fundamentals

Administration and evolution of CITES

2. EXPERIENCES WITH PROPOSALS TO LIST SPECIES IN THE CITES APPENDICES

Inclusion of species in Appendix II

3. CITES PERCEPTIONS

4. FOREST SPECIES INCLUDED IN THE CITES APPENDICES

Trade in CITES-listed plants

Horticultural plants

Medicinal plants

Animal species

5. EXPERIENCES WITH CITES IMPLEMENTATION AND CHALLENGES WITH NON-COMPLIANCE

Appendix I

Appendix II

Appendix III

General issues of compliance

6. CITES IMPACTS ON FOREST PRODUCT TRADE, PRODUCTION AND CONSERVATION

The challenge of assessing CITES impacts in isolation of other factors

Impacts on trade patterns

Conservation impacts

Livelihood impacts

7. CITES AND THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION

Resolution of disputes

Observer status

8. WHERE NEXT FOR CITES AND SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT?

CITES and the trade in forest products

Non-wood forest products trade

CITES as a forum for stimulating discussion and action

CITES and the CBD

CONCLUSIONS

REFERENCES

ANNEX I

ANNEX II