Report of the FAO Workshop on Governance of Tenure for Responsible Capture Fisheries. Rome, 4–6 July 2011

FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Report. No. 983

Report of the FAO Workshop on Governance of Tenure for Responsible Capture Fisheries
Rome, 4–6 July 2011






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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Rome 2011


ABSTRACT

FAO.
Report of the FAO Workshop on Governance of Tenure for Responsible Capture Fisheries. Rome, 4–6 July 2011. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Report. No. 983. Rome, FAO. 2011. 34p.

The Workshop on Governance of Tenure for Responsible Capture Fisheries was convened by the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department in collaboration with the Land Tenure Unit of the Natural Resources and Environment Department to generate inputs and guidance on the contents and process of developing fisheries sector specific implementation guidelines on the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security. The workshop reviewed the experiences of tenure arrangements in different regions, fisheries and socio-economic settings around the world and listened to the voices of fishers on their perspectives of tenure in fisheries. These voices and case study findings together with other experiences and demands by fishworkers' organizations informed the principles and good practices identified by the workshop participants on governance of tenure for responsible capture fisheries. There was a consensus that secure tenure arrangements for the use and management of fisheries and other resources lead to more desirable outcomes in terms of resource use and sustainability. Tenure governance goals should be orientated towards improving food security and/or livelihoods, contributing towards well-being. Tenure arrangements that align use and management provide good incentives for sustainable use. Tenure arrangements can and should accommodate diversity. A specific focus should be given to equity issues, e.g. who holds fishing rights, which are crucial to community well-being, food security and poverty alleviation, and how tenure impacts on social, economic and human rights.


Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION

2. DAY ONE

 

2.1 Opening of the workshop

 

2.2 Case study presentation

   

2.2.1 Inland fisheries, lagoons and marine protected areas (MPAs)

   

2.2.2 Voices of fishers'

3. DAY TWO

 

3.1 Summary of key issues of the case study presentations

   

3.1.1 Governance of tenure in fisheries

   

3.1.2 Governance of tenure as a process

   

3.1.3 Key factors to consider in tenure systems in fisheries

 

3.2 Tenure arrangements and forms of good governance that foster desirable outcomes for responsible capture fisheries

   

3.2.1 Small-scale capture fisheries

   

3.2.2 Indigenous and customary rights

   

3.2.3 Inland fisheries, lagoons and MPAs

 

3.3 Review of the first draft of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests

4. DAY THREE

 

4.1 Principles emerging on tenure and good governance of tenure in capture fisheries

   

4.1.1 Assumptions and goals underlying motivation for tenure governance

   

4.1.2 Emerging principles

   

4.1.3 Key implementation issues

 

4.2 Mechanisms, processes and actions for the implementation of governance in fisheries

   

4.2.1 Where there is no tenure system

   

4.2.2 Where tenure needs to be revived/reaffirmed

   

4.2.3 Where existing tenure needs to be protected

 

4.3 The way forward


APPENDIXES

A.

Agenda

B.

List of participants

C.

Prospectus


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