The vulnerability of fishing-dependent economies to disasters.

FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular. No. 1081

The vulnerability of fishing-dependent economies to disasters


by
Marie-Caroline Badjeck
The WorldFish Center
Penang, Malaysia

Allison Perry
The WorldFish Center
Penang, Malaysia

Silvia Renn
The WorldFish
Center Penang, Malaysia

David Brown
Fisheries and Aquaculture Officer
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
Rome, Italy

and

Florence Poulain
Fisheries and Aquaculture Officer
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department
Rome, Italy



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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Rome 2013


ABSTRACT

Badjeck, M.-C., Perry, A., Renn, S., Brown, D. & Poulain, F. 2013.
The vulnerability of fishing-dependent economies to disasters.
FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular. No. 1081. Rome, FAO. 19 pp.

This circular examines the vulnerability of fishing-dependent communities to natural disasters. The objective was to identify countries that are particularly vulnerable to disasters but also those that are less resilient. Fisheries and fishing-dependent people are often located in places that are at particularly high risk of extreme events such as flooding, cyclones, and tsunamis, while inland fisheries can be significantly affected by droughts and floods. In addition to the tragic loss of life, disasters can have direct impacts on livelihoods such as destruction of gear, infrastructure and productive assets, such as boats, landing sites, and post-harvesting facilities. Indirect impacts can also be important through disruption to markets and through reducing harvesting capacity and access to markets, food supply and employment, thereby affecting both local livelihoods and the overall economy. The circular concludes that the fishery sectors of African and Southeast Asian countries are most vulnerable to disasters, according to both frequency and mortality exposure indicators, fishery-dependence, and capacity to adapt. Recommendations are made with respect to strengthening understanding of vulnerability measurement.


Table of Contents

1.

INTRODUCTION

2.

CONCEPTS AND METHODS

 

2.1

Vulnerability to natural hazards

 

2.2

Spatial and temporal scales

 

2.2

Vulnerability components: constructing indicators

3.

RESULTS

 

3.1

Exposure

 

3.2

Sensitivity or dependence of national economies on the fisheries sector

 

3.3

Adaptive capacity

 

3.4

Vulnerability

4.

RECOMMENDATION FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

REFERENCES



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