Non-wood forest products of Bhutan













Table of Contents


RAP PUBLICATION: 1996/6

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Bangkok, Thailand

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion 077 the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Photo Credits

Photographer

Peyton Johnson
M. Kashio
Patrick B. Durst
Narong Chomchalow

For copies write to:

Patrick B. Durst
Regional Forestry Officer
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
39 Phra Atit Road
Bangkok 10200
Thailand

This electronic document has been scanned using optical character recognition (OCR) software and careful manual recorrection. Even if the quality of digitalisation is high, the FAO declines all responsibility for any discrepancies that may exist between the present document and its original printed version.


Table of Contents


Foreword

Preface

Overview of non-wood forest products in Bhutan

Forest policy
Forest strategy
Forest legislation rules and regulations
The importance of non-wood forest products
Problems and constraints in developing non-wood forest products
General recommendations for long-term activities in developing non-wood forest products
Organisations involved in the development of non-wood forest products

Bamboo, cane, wild banana, fibre, floss and brooms

Bamboo
Cane
Wild banana
Fibre, floss and brooms

Medicinal plants

Trade in medicinal plants in the past
Scope for international marketing
Scope for cultivating medicinal plants
Nature: The best teacher
Medicinal plants, present collection trends and current problems
General recommendations
Conclusion

Traditional paper, essential oils, rosin and turpentine

Traditional paper
Essential oils
Rosin and turpentine

Vegetable oil and ornamental plants

Vegetable oil
Ornamental plants

Basic information on Bhutan's Himalayan yew (Taxus baccata)

Background
Conclusions

Natural vegetable dyes; Food, fruit species and mushrooms; Gums and waxes; and incense

Natural vegetable dyes
Edible products from forests - food, fruit species and mushrooms
Gums and waxes
Incense

References