TCP/BGD/8822 Field Document No. 1

TECHNICAL COOPERATION PROGRAMME

PREPARATION OF A HACCP-BASED FISH QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAMME

PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF HACCP PLANS AT PROCESSING PLANT LEVEL

BASED ON THE WORK OF

INFOFISH

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

BANGKOK, 1998

 

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

PROCESS MONITORING AND DOCUMENTATION

ANNEX 1  TRAINING PROGRAMME CONTENT

ANNEX 2  CATEGORIES OF PERSONNEL TRAINED

ANNEX 3  CHITTAGONG PROGRAM

ANNEX 4  KHULNA PROGRAM

ANNEX 5  HACCP MANUAL EVALUATION - COMPANIES ASSISTED

ANNEX 6  DOCUMENTS PROVIDED BY THE CONSULTANTS TO INDUSTRY & FISH INSPECTION & QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORIES

ANNEX 7  BASIC LABORATORY EQUIPMENTS/CHEMICALS REQUIRED FOR ROUTINE QUALITY ASSURANCE WORK BY IN-PLANT LABORATORIES & FIQC

 

INTRODUCTION

In 1995, Government of Bangladesh approached FAO for technical assistance in the area of fish quality improvement. FAO provided this assistance in the form of a TCP project "Preparation of HACCP-based fish quality assurance programme - TCP/BGD/4555 (A) which started operations in August 1995. The project of one year duration was subsequently extended through December 1997. Project phase II (TCP/BGD/8822 (A) was subsequently approved to complete training activities that were not achieved during the earlier project. These were confided to INFOFISH under a contractual arrangement with FAO, to allow collaboration with an ongoing three-years INFOFISH project activity in Bangladesh "Export Promotion of Value-added Fishery Products and their Sustainable Development (FSCFT/02)" in areas of training in quality assurance and environmental monitoring.

The mission program was designed primarily to cater for the objectives and recommended outputs detailed in the project agreement as per following terms of reference:

- Make a series of demonstrations at shrimp/fish processing plants in Chittagong and Khulna on the practical application of HACCP at plant level, specifically concerning the areas of monitoring, corrective actions, recording, and verification.

- Assist Department of Fisheries (DOF) Fish Inspection and Quality Control in the practical implementation of an operational structure able to cope with the new tasks of a HACCP-based fish inspection service.

- Prepare a concise mission report with results of the mission and a draft Terminal Statement comprising also conclusion and recommendations to the Government as to what follow-up action needs to be carried out.

The program was conducted by the international consultants, Dr (Mrs) N Anandavally (India) and Ms Suwimon Keerativiriyaporn, and coordinated by Dr S Subasinghe, Technical Adviser, INFOFISH. It was held at two locations, Chittagong and Khulna. Chittagong, with over 55 seafood processing facilities, is the major seafood export processing center of Bangladesh, while Khulna, with around 35 factories is the second most important. The program of activities at Chittagong and Khulna are shown in Annex 3.

Training programs

The programs at the processing facilities followed a similar pattern (Annex 1). After an introductory meeting, the participants were led round the factory for an evaluation of the existing facilities, practices related to raw material receipt, handling, processing and quality control, hygiene and sanitation practices, examination including records. The observations were subsequently discussed and necessary guidelines were given on all aspects for the scientific implementation of HACCP & EU Directive 91/493/EEC & 94/356/EEC particularly in the areas of Plant Sanitation, Personnel Hygiene, GMPs.

On the second day of the training programs, the HACCP Manual of the Company was evaluated and critically examined at an open session of discussion. Lack of consistency and brevity in describing the organizational structure/products/processes, non-scientific identification of CCPs, inadequate/inconsistent provision for monitoring, record keeping and verification were some of the notable deficiencies in the HACCP plans. Participants were given guidelines on how to avoid such situations in the preparation of a HACCP Manual.

The in-house laboratories of the two processing plants were visited at Khulna. Laboratory analytical and monitoring procedures and related records were examined and critically evaluated. The need for Good Laboratory Practices was explained so that better utilisation of the in-plant laboratory could be made for successful implementation of HACCP based process planning to assure product quality and safety.

The four training programs were attended by a total of 111 participants. The categories of participants (Annex 2) at the four training programs mainly comprised of Quality Control Officers (45), QC Managers (10), QC Inspectors (10), Factory Managers (7), Product Managers (6) and several other categories of staff. There were 24 participants from government institutions, 24 from FIQC laboratories and 2 from Department of Fisheries (DOF).

Programs at M/s Choudhury & Co. Ltd. and M/s Fish Preservers Ltd. in Chittagong were attended by a total of 32 participants, 16 participants at each of the plants. Training program at M/s Aqua Resources Ltd., Khulna was attended by 39 participants while the one held at M/s Fresh Foods Ltd., Khulna was attended by 40 participants. (Annexes 3 & 4)

LABORATORY DEMONSTRATION

Laboratory sessions commenced with a demonstration of sampling, extraction and isolation & identification of bacterial pathogens using conventional methods (biochemical & serological). It was noted that the methods presently employed by various laboratories showed considerable variation and inconsistency.

Rapid Test Kits

Methods of using rapid test kits for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonela, E coli & Vibrio cholerae was also demonstrated using Neogen (USA) test kits. Such methods could be used by the industry for qualitative and a limited degree of quantitative microbiological and chemical analytical work, with a considerable saving of time, and also for cross checking laboratory results. There was keen interest among participants in these methods. However, it was pointed out that these methods cannot completely replace standard laboratory analytical ones due to various technological limitations and relatively high cost.

Bisulphite monitoring

The major products of Bangladesh fishery exports are head-on/shell-on or headless/shell-on products. Considerable amount of raw material, especially from areas such as Chittagong and Cox's Bazar come from marine capture fishery. Even though the staff of many processing plants are not familiar with the use of bisulphite, it is very likely that it is used in multi-day marine shrimp fishery operations, in which case all the HACCP plans need to address the control and monitoring of bisulphite residue. None of the HACCP plans examined have addressed bisulphite residue as a contaminant in raw material, process additive or in labeling.

During the laboratory session the procedure for monitoring residual bisulphite using Malachite Green Test was demonstrated and the relevance of addressing bisulphite residue as a possible hazard under US-FDA HACCP Regulations was highlighted.

PROCESS MONITORING AND DOCUMENTATION

Training activities, demonstrations and discussion sessions related to various aspects of process monitoring and documentation formed a key element in the training programs conducted at the four processing facilities. The major areas examined can be broadly identified as follows:

Process hygiene and sanitation

It was noted that the participants needed much guidance on monitoring process hygiene and sanitation. Chlorination of water to various chlorine concentrations and monitoring available chlorine in them, microbilogical/chemical analysis of water, ice and microbiological examination of swabs from food contact surfaces were demonstrated, and their relevance in HACCP based production planning was discussed. Various approaches to calculating final results were explained.

Process monitoring and corrective actions

Participants also benefited by the discussions held on process monitoring, identifying as far as possible plant-specific responsibilities of various staff in process monitoring, including frequency of monitoring, yet again taking into consideration plant specific practical limitations. During discussions methodologies related to devising effective corrective actions and criteria to be used in fixing responsibilities to staff and the need for appropriate documentation of corrective actions was examined.

Calibration

Even though, calibration of measuring/testing equipment is a mandatory requirement in any Quality System, this aspect was not adequately addressed in any of the manuals examined and there was no knowledge of its direct relevance in HACCP based systems among the participants. The procedure for calibration, documentation, use of reference thermometer were explained along with some guidance on record keeping formats to be employed.

Several processing facilities have already been issued with flexible wire type temperature probes (by INFOFISH/CFC project) for the purpose of monitoring the freezing cycle and efficacy of freezing units. Usage of these equipment was demonstrated. The operation of a pH/ion meter with selective ion electrodes (Cadmium, Nitrate, Ammonia, Calcium, Phosphate), also provided under INFOFISH project for one of the laboratories for environmental study purposes, was demonstrated.

Record keeping and documentation

Record keeping systems of the units visited were examined with the view to assessing their adequacy to document HACCP activities and monitoring their effectiveness. The consultants noticed that there was lack of knowledge on what type of information should be included in records and the importance of reviewing and signing records. After lengthy discussion and a critical evaluation of the methods adopted the participants were given guidance on standard internationally accepted methods of documentation and record keeping. Model forms used for this purpose were circulated and their usage explained.

Evaluation of HACCP manuals

A total of 42 HACCP manuals (Annex 5) were critically evaluated by the consultants, 20 from plants located in Chittagong area and 22 from those located in Khulna area.

ACTIVITIES IN FIQC LABORATORIES

The training and demonstration sessions at the two Fish Inspection and Quality Control Laboratories (FIQC) at Chittagong and Khulna were attended by FIQC laboratory staff and a few participants from industry directly involved in laboratory analytical work. It was noted that the methods presently employed by various laboratories, including FIQC laboratories, showed considerable variation and inconsistency with respect to sampling, sample handling, testing and reporting system. Guidelines for rectifying this situation were given.

After a brief preliminary discussion on the analytical methodologies to be demonstrated, and their relevance to HACCP based process planning, demonstration of methods of sampling, extraction and isolation & identification of bacterial pathogens using conventional methods (biochemical & serological) was carried out.

It was noted that the present method of isolation & identification of Salmonella, a pathogen the presence of which is a primary reason for rejection of many shipments from Bangladesh, needs refining and improvement. A complete demonstration was given of isolation & identification of Salmonella including all the steps such as pre-enrichment, enrichment, isolation, biochemical & serological test methods. In addition, the method of using rapid test kits for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonela, E coli & Vibrio cholerae was also demonstrated using Neogen (USA) test kits.

The chemical test method of bisulphite detection and estimation was also demonstrated. The procedure for monitoring residual bisulphite using Malachite Green Test was demonstrated and relevance of addressing bisulphite residue as a possible hazard under US-FDA HACCP Regulations was highlighted.

Presence of filth and decomposition are two major reasons for rejection in the US of shrimp exports from Bangladesh. Standard methods for testing seafood for filth and decomposition were demonstrated, and the standard format for reporting results was presented. It was also felt that the FIQC laboratories should procure and hold reliable live cultures for confirmation of pathogens. A copy of the 'Lab Manual on Procedures for Microbiological & Chemical testing' was provided to FIQC Laboratory (Annex 6).

IMPLEMENTATION OF EU DIRECTIVE

EU ban on seafood exports from Bangladesh has been partially lifted. Seventeen (17) seafood export-processing companies are now allowed to export to EU while others are awaiting inclusion in the provisional lists being prepared by the Department of Fisheries. The companies have spent a lot of money in getting the assistance of consultants in modifying their plants to satisfy EU requirements. However, in the industry, there appears to be a lack of clear understanding on the basic requirements of the EU Directive 91/493/EEC with respect to plant construction and layout, and infrastructure requirements. As a result many factories have spent their resources on cosmetic changes neglecting vital areas which need urgent attention. The EU Directive was discussed in detail in the light of these industry developments and based on practical experience of the consultants, stressing the need to address key aspects which have direct relevance to HACCP based process planning. Industry was also provided with relevant audit check lists.

RESULTS

The project trained a total of 111 persons (26 from government sector and 85 from industry), mainly key industry personnel involved in quality control and production, and those directly involved in the application of HACCP at plant level, on correct application of monitoring, recording and verification procedures, with special reference to process specific Critical Control Points.

The project also interacted effectively with the Inspection service (DOF) on the practical shift from traditional methods of fish inspection to the HACCP system. The training programs and laboratory activities undertaken at the FIQC laboratories in Chittagong and Khulna were specially geared to train a total 24 field inspectors in areas such as the implementation of validation, verification and certification of HACCP plans at plant level. The programs conducted at FIQC laboratories, while introducing new analytical techniques, laid special emphasis on the new role of laboratory analysis within the HACCP concept. Special discussion sessions held with the government field staff enabled the consultants to clarify certain technical ambiguities the staff had in the practical application of HACCP and laboratory techniques. Thus it can be concluded that the project has successfully achieved the major goals identified in the project document.

CONCLUSION & RECOMMENDATIONS

1. In most processing facilities, management/supervisory staff directly involved in quality control/production duties require training in practical approaches to implementing HACCP based quality assurance programs and process planning. This is important for them to change their mindset from the traditional approach of quality control and end product testing. Such training should cover areas such as modern approaches to sanitation, process hygiene with special reference to practical approaches to HACCP implementation, audit, record keeping, documentation and certification.

2. The plant laboratories of most processing units are not geared to assist in the implementation of HACCP based quality assurance programs due to lack of necessary key equipment/reagents and media/technical know-how. It is recommended that laboratory staff be given adequate training (at least one week training) in basic microbiological/chemical analytical techniques and record keeping, an urgent need at this juncture.

3. The Fish Inspection and Quality Control (FIQC) Laboratories too must be adequately equipped for microbiological and chemical analytical work (Annex 7). This is very important considering their regulatory role and possible economic/legal implications therein. In this respect it is important for the two laboratories to equip themselves with the necessary equipment, chemicals, bacterial cultures etc. on an urgent basis. The government laboratories should also assist the industry by undertaking environmental monitoring, a new reporting requirement, which the industry can not cope on a routine basis due to limitations in resources and trained manpower.

4. It was noticed that both in government and industry laboratories there is wide variation, and even deviation, from internationally accepted methodologies in test procedures: sampling, sample handling, extraction, analytical techniques and reporting. Hence, provision of suitable training to at least two staff from each in-plant laboratory is highly recommended. After successful training these staff can be put in overall control of testing & reporting.

In the case of FIQC laboratories, mindful of the responsible role they play in their regulatory capacity, it is recommended that at least three staff from each of the two laboratories undergo advanced training in microbiological/ chemical analytical techniques. This may also include training in techniques such as Atomic Absorption (AA) Spectroscopy, High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Gas Liquid Chromatography (GLC), bacterial sero-typing etc.

5. Validation of laboratory techniques through inter laboratory programs is recommended. It is also recommended that both government and industry laboratories have accessibility to rapid-test kits to save time when quantitative data are not required, and to also cross check their laboratory results periodically. It is also recommended that some national scheme is designed to standardize laboratory equipment on a routine basis, in collaboration with a national body (Bangladesh Standard Institutions) or in areas where provision for such standardization is not available locally, with an international institution.

6. Poor accessibility to information (regulations, standards, test methods etc) was noted at all levels, both in the government sector as well as industry. The information presently available is diffused, located in various places and sometimes in personal collections. In this connection setting up of a centralized reference library (or two, one in Chittagong and another in Khulna), with accessibility to industry, is strongly recommended. It is recommended that provision (budgetary and manpower) is provided to procure publications, information material and to liaise with national, regional and international centers/focal points, especially INFOFISH, on a routine basis.

ANNEX 1

TRAINING PROGRAMME CONTENT

Given below is the basic content of the two day training programs conducted at M/s Choudhury & Co. Ltd., M/s Fish Preservers Ltd., Ms Aqua Resources Ltd. and M/s Fresh Foods Ltd.

Day 1

1. Introductory meeting

2. Factory and site inspection

3. Examination of plant layout, process planning and records

4. Discussion of plant layout, operation and records with respect to

- Process hygiene and sanitation

- Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs)

- Process monitoring and corrective action

- Record keeping and documentation

Day 2

5. Examination of HACCP manual with respect to 4. above

6. Discussion and evaluation of HACCP manual

7. In-plant laboratory visit and examination of records

8. Demonstration of laboratory techniques - bisulphite monitoring

- use of rapid test kids

9. Discussion of basic microbiological sampling and analytical techniques

10. Closing session

ANNEX 2

CATEGORIES OF PERSONNEL TRAINED

1. Quality Control Officer 45

2. Quality Control Manager 10

3. Quality Control Inspector 10

4. Factory Manager 7

5. Production Manger 6

6. Microbiologist 6

7. Quality Control Supervisor 5

8. Factory Manager 5

9. Laboratory Technician 5

10. Processing Technologist 3

11. General Managers 3

12. Director 2

13. Managing Director 1

14. Biochemist 1

15. Commercial Officer 1

16. Research Student 1

Total 111

TRAINEES BY SECTOR

Government (FIQC - 22 and DOF-02) = 24

Bangladesh Fisheries Development Corporation (BFDC) = 2

Industry = 85

Total 111

ANNEX 3

CHITTAGONG PROGRAM

18-19 October : Training program and demonstration at M/s. Choudhury and Company Ltd., Chittagong.

20-21 October : Training program and demonstration at M/s Fish Preservers Ltd., Chittagong.

22 October : Discussions on HACCP manuals at Hotel Meridian, Chittagong.

24-26 October : Demonstration and discussions at Fish Inspection and Quality Control Laboratory (FIQC), Chittagong.

KHULNA PROGRAM

28-29 October : Training program and demonstration at Ms Aqua Resources Ltd., Khulna.

31 October - 01 November : Training program and demonstration at Ms Fresh Foods Ltd., Khulna.

02-03 November : Training program and demonstration at Fish Inspection and Quality Control Laboratory, Khulna.

04 November : Discussion and evaluation of HACCP manuals at the conference hall of Bangladesh Frozen Food Exporters Association, Khulna.

ANNEX 4

HACCP-based Fish Quality Assurance Program (TCP/BGD/8822)

Training Program - Chittagong

1st Training Program - list of participants

Venue : M/S Chowdhury & Co. Ltd

34/A, Kalurghat Hevy Industrial Area, Chittagong.

Date : 18-19 October, 1998

1. Mr Azizur Rahman Khan

QC Officer

Meghna Sea Foods Ltd

2. Mr Jamil Ahmed

Factory Manager

Meenhar Fisheries Ltd

3. Mr Dilip Kumar Chowdhury

QC Manager

Meenhar Sea Foods Ltd

4. Mr Didarul Alam

QC Officer

Conception Sea Foods Ltd

5. Mr Md Shafiqur Rahman

QC Officer

Sirajul Islam Chy. Trawlers Ltd

6. Mr Kajal Kanti Chowdhury

General Manager

Sager Foods Ltd

7. Mr Abu Shama Md Ataur Rahman

QC Manager

Sar and Co Ltd

8. Mr Md Majba Ul Alam

QC Officer

Chowhury & Co (BD) Ltd

9. Ms Hla Ree Bou

QC Officer

Anraj Fish Products Ind. Ltd

10. Ms Hamida Yesmeen Khan

QC Manager

Coastal Sea Foods Ltd

11. Mr Ranjit Biswas

Fish Processing Technician

BFDC Cox's Bazar

12. Mr Md Osman Gani Majumder

Student

IMS Research

13. Mr Md Kader Ahmed

Inspector

FIQC

14. Mr Md Abul Hashanath

Inspector

FIQC

15. Mr Md Abdul Aziz

Inspector

FIQC

16. Mr Md Shahid Ullah

Microbiologist

FIQC

2nd Training Program - list of participants

Venue : M/S Fish Preservers Ltd

292, Nasirabad Industrial Area

Baizid Bostami Road, Chittagong

Date : 20-21 October, 1998

1. Mr ABM Zahirul Islam

Production Manager

Neptune Sea Foods Ltd

2. Mr Ranatosh Dev

QC Officer

Mahi Fish Processing Ltd

3. Mr Mohd Abdur Rashid

QC Officer

Fish Preservers Ltd

4. Mr Mohd Hefzul Bari

Manager

Beximo Foods Ltd

5. Mr Md Taleb Hossain

Factory Manager

Conception Sea Foods Ltd

6. Mr Md Shafiul alam

QC Officer

International Sea Foods Ltd

7. Mr Nazmul Ahsan

QC Officer

Mermaid Ltd

8. Mr Salauddin Ahmed

QC Officer

Frozen Foods Ltd

9. Mr Nurul Afsar Chandan

QC Manager

Kuliarchar Cold Storage Ltd

10. Mr Uttam Kumar Barua

Project Manager

MHK Shipping Ltd

11. Mr Shabuddin

QC Manager

Apex Foods Ltd

12. Mr Md Faridul Alam

Fish Processing Technologist

BFDC, Chittagong

13. Ms Pravati Dev

Technologist

FIQC, Chittagong

14. Ms Mansura Begum

Biochemist

FIQC, Chittagong

15. Mr Abdul Hannan

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

16. Mr Azizul Hoque Mollah

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

3rd Training Program - list of participants

Venue : Aqua Resources Limited

A/7 Bscic Industrial Estate Shiromoni

Khulna, Bangladesh

Date : 28-29 October, 1998

1. Dr Akhtar Ahmed

Director

Aqua Resources Ltd

2. Major Manzoor Ahmed

Managing Director

Aqua Resources Ltd

3. Mr S Mosharraf

General Manager

Aqua Resources Ltd

4. Mr Sk Shamim Ali

Manager

Aqua Resources Ltd

5. Mr SK Asjad Ali

Commercial Officer

Aqua Resources Ltd

6. Mr Md Saifuzzaman

QC Officer

Aqua Resources Ltd

7. Mr Uttam Kumar Shaha

Shift in Charge

Aqua Resources Ltd

8. Mr Aminur Rahman

Shift in charge

Aqua Resources Ltd

9. Mr Makbul Hossain

Shift in Charge

Aqua Resources Ltd

10. Mr Uttam Kumar Sakkar

Lab Technician

Aqua Resources Ltd

11. Mr Abu Sufian

QC Inspector

Aqua Resources Ltd

12. Mr Shazli Khan

QC Inspector

Aqua Resources Ltd

13. Miss Nipa Akhtar

QC Inspector

Aqua Resources Ltd

14. Miss Zeenat Sultana

QC Inspector

Aqua Resources Ltd

15. Ms Shahana Khatun

QC Inspector

Aqua Resources Ltd

16. Mr Rafiqul Islam

Inspector

FIQC, Dhaka

17. Mr Atul Kumar Paul

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

18. Mr Kador Ahmed

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

19. Mr Ruhul Amin

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

20. Mr Shahidul Alam

Technical Assistant

FIQC, Chittagong

21. Mr Shamsudding Elias

Microbiologist

FIQC, Khulna

22. Mr Shahjahan Ali

Inspector

FIQC, Khulna

23. Mr Md Golam Mostofa

Microbiologist

FIQC, Khulna

24. Mr Quamrul Islam Jotder

Technical Assistant

FIQC, Khulna

25. Mr Motaher Hossain

DOF, Dhaka

26. Mr Imran Ashfaq

Director

United Fish Export Ltd

27. Mr Saiful Haque

QC Manager

Oriental Fish Processing & Culture Ltd

28. Mr Al-Haj G M Kamarul Islam

Factory Manager

Achia Sea Foods Ltd

29. Mr Hafizur Rahman

QC Officer

Sekai Corporation

30. Mr Abdul Monayem

Factory Manager

31. Mr Abul Kasem Chowdhury

QC Officer

M U Sea Foods Ltd

32. Mr Ferdous Hossain Khan

QC Manager

Shahnewas Sea Foods (Pvt) Ltd

33. Ms Rashida Begun (Lucky)

QC Officer

Amam Sea Foods Ind. Ltd

34. Mr Rasel Kabir

QC Officer

Khulna Frozen Foods Export Ltd

35. Mr Ferojul Hasan

QC Officer

Sundarban Fish Processing (Pvt) Ltd

36. Mr Babu Sukalgan Ray

QC Officer

Rupali Sea Foods Ltd

37. Mr Didar Hossain Bhuiyan

QC Officer

Sobi Fish Processing Ind. Ltd

38. Mr Shahid Khan

Lab Technician

Bangladesh Seafood Ind. Ltd

39. Mr Gopal Chandra Das

QC Officer

BFFEA

Sekai Corporation

National Sea Foods Ind. Ltd

4th TrainingProgram - list of participants

Venue : M/S Fresh Foods Ltd., Khulna

Date : 30-31 October, 1998

1. Mr Anjuman Ara Begum

Asst. QC Officer

H R Sea Food

2. Mr Md Salim Ullah

Factory Manager

Asian Sea Food Ltd

3. Mr Md Abul Hasen

QC Officer

Sigma Sea Foods Ltd

4. Mr Md Moftan Billah

QC Officer

New Foods Ltd

5. Mr Mohammad Eusuf Hasan

Microbiologist

International Shrimps Export Ltd

6. Mr Md Nafuduyzaman

Production Assistant

Bengal Fish Processing Co.

7. Ms Shib Sarker Sara

Asst. Microbiologist

Shanewas Sea Food (Pvt) Ltd

8. Mr Sujit Kumar Saha

QC Officer

Bionic Seafood Export Ltd

9. Mr Durlar Golder

Asst. Microbiologist

Prince Sea Foods (Pvt) Ltd

10. Mr Kazi Md Tariqul Alam

QA Manager

Modern Sea Food Ind. Ltd

11. Mr Md Saidur Rahman

QC Officer

Southern Foods Ltd

12. Mr Morizul Islam

QC Officer

Johanabad Sea Foods Ltd.

13. Mr Abdul Rouf

Factory Manager

Satkhira Foods Ltd

14. Mr Md Goker Rasal

Assistant General Manager

Delta Fish Ltd

15. Shaikh Mofizul Alam

FI & QC Officer

Zemini Sea Foods Ltd

16. Mr Md Shahidul Alam

Technical Assistant

FIQC, Chittagong

17. Mr Sushobhan Majumdur

FIQC, Khulna

18. Mr Atul Kumar Paul

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

19. Mr M Rafiqul Islam

Inspector

FIQC, Dhaka

20. Mr Md Ruhul Amin

Inspector

FIQC, Chittagong

21. Mr Md Mofazzal Hossein

DOF

22. Mr Ranjit

Supervisor

Far Food Ltd

23. Mr Mohammad Bodrul Munir

QC Officer & Laboratory in-Charge

Lockpur Fish Processing Co Ltd

24. Mr Gouttam Kumar Deb

QC Supervisor

Fresh Foods Ltd

25. Mr Shriebag Kumar Das

Shift in-Charge

Fresh Foods Ltd

26. Mr Kazjal

Production Supervisor

Fresh Foods Ltd

27. Mr Md Norishuddin

Production Manager

Fresh Foods Ltd

28. Mr Zahid Hayat Mahmud

QC Officer

Fresh Foods Ltd

29. Mr Md Humayun Kabir

QC Officer

Oriental Supply Co Ltd

30. Mr Akhil Kumar Saha

QA Manager

Bagerhat Seafood Ind. Ltd

31. Mr Md Shafiqur Rahman

Factory Manager

Fresh Foods Ltd

32. Mr Md Robial Islam

Fresh Foods Ltd

33. Mr Babul Mallick

C/S in-Charge

Fresh Foods Ltd

34. Mr S M Tohun Reza

Production Supervisor

Fresh Foods Ltd

35. Mr Jillur Rahaman

Production Manager

Fresh Foods Ltd

36. Mr Md Nazrul Islam

Foreman

Fresh Foods Ltd

37. Mr M A Zaffar Chy.

QC Officer

Emon Ice & Cold Storage Ltd

38. Mr Nuruzzaman

Supervisor

Fresh Foods Ltd, Khulna

39. Mr Gopal Chandrea Das

QI Officer

BFFEA, Khulna

ANNEX 5

HACCP MANUAL EVALUATION - COMPANIES ASSISTED

Megna Sea Foods Ltd

Conception Sea Foods Ltd

Sirajul Islam Chy. Trawlers Ltd

Sager Foods Ltd

Sar & Co Ltd

Chowdhury & Co (BD) Ltd

Anraj Fish Products Ind. Ltd

Coastal Sea Foods Ltd

IMS Research

Neptune Sea Foods Ltd

Mahi Fish Processing Ltd

Fish Preservers Ltd

Beximo Foods Ltd

Conception Sea Foods Ltd

International Sea Foods Ltd

Mermaid Ltd

Frozen Foods Ltd

Kuliarchar Cold Storage Ltd

MHK Shipping Ltd

Apex Foods Ltd

Aqua Resources Ltd

United Fish Export Ltd

Oriental Fish Processing & Culture Ltd

Achia Sea Foods Ltd

Sekai Corporation

National Sea Foods Ind. Ltd

M U Sea Foods Ltd

Shahnewaz Sea Foods (Pvt) Ltd

Amam Sea Foods Ind. Ltd

Sundarban Fish Processing (Pvt)

Rupali Sea Foods Ltd

Sobi Fish Processing Ind. Ltd

Bangladesh Seafood Ind. Ltd

H R Sea Food

Asian Sea Food Ltd

Sigma Sea Foods Ltd

New Foods Ltd

International Shrimps Export Ltd

Bengal Fish Processing Co.

Shanewaz Sea Food (Pvt) Ltd

Bionic Seafood Export Ltd

Fresh Foods Ltd

ANNEX 6

DOCUMENTS PROVIDED BY THE CONSULTANTS TO INDUSTRY & FISH INSPECTION & QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORIES

1. Food Quality and Systems - Training Safety Manual, FAO

2. Q&A on HACCP, US-FDA

3. Lab Manual on Procedures for Microbiological & Chemical testing

4. Govt. of India Regulation on Fish Inspection

5. Procedure for Filth Testing in Food

6. Check list for Plant Evaluation as per EU & HACCP Regulation

7. Formats for recording laboratory results

8. Procedures for use of Rapid Test Kits for Salmonella, E coli & other pathogens

9. Malachite Green Reagent (FIQC & industry)

10. Formats for recording Sanitation & Hygiene

Formats for recording Cleaning operations

Formats for recording On-Line Q/C

11. G.M.P. Guidelines for Frozen Seafood, DFO, Thailand

12. Role of Government Agencies in Auditing

13. EU directives (91/493, 80/778, 93/45/94/356, 94/351

14. US-FDA procedure for Decomposition and Salmonella

15. FDA format for reporting filth & Salmonella

16. Method for determining percentage of hypochlorite and available chlorine, and the chart.

17. CODEX Food Hygiene

18. Model HACCP Manual

19. A set of Rapid Test Kit for Salmonella & E.coli (presented to Fish Inspection & Quality Control Laboratory at Khulna)

20. A copy of the Book titled HACCP "A Practical Approach"

ANNEX 7

BASIC LABORATORY EQUIPMENTS/CHEMICALS REQUIRED FOR ROUTINE QUALITY ASSURANCE WORK BY IN-PLANT LABORATORIES & FIQC

Item (Indicative Price US$)

1. Hot air oven (14" x 14" x 14") US$ 600

2. Autoclave (medium) US$ 800

3. Water bath (serological) US$ 350

4. Incubator US$ 400

5. Vacuum pump (0.5 hp) US$ 200

6. Stereoscopic microscope (30x) US$ 900

7. Biological microscope US$ 300

8. Anaerobic jar US$ 250

9. Blender/stomacher US$ 600

10. Refrigerator US$ 500

11. Platinum loop US$ 150

12. Sampling scoop/electric drill type US$ 150

13. Digital thermometer US$ 70

14. pH meter - (portable) US$ 50

15. Digital weighing balance US$ 800

16. Sieves No. 82 & No. 140 US$ 150

17. Micro slides )

18. Pipette (25, 50 ml) )

19. Biurette (1-50 ml) - ) US$ 1500

20. Flasks conical (all measurements) )

21. Peridishes - (100 mm) )

22. DPD kit or Orthotoludine test kit for chlorine )

23. Chlorine test paper )

24. Malachite green (reagent) - ) US$ 800

25. Trap flask for filth )

26. Heptane (Analar) )

27. Rapid test kits

- Salmonella )

- E Coli )

- Hygiene kit )

- Vibrio cholera )

- Listeria for cooked products - ) US$ 3200

- Drug residue/pesticide )

- Polyvalent antisera for salmonella 'O' & 'H' )

- Polyvalent antisera for Vibrio Cholera )

- Human/rabbit plasma )

- Sulphite - alert kit )

28. Following microbiological media for confirmations when rapid test kits answer positive (minimum pack size)

Lactose broth )

SCB )

TTB )

RV )

BSA - D/oxoid )

HEA )

XLDA )

DCA )

MacCenkey Broth purple - ) US$ 2000

BGLB )

Indote medium )

MR.VP. medium )

Citrate medium )

Baird parker agar - oxoid )

TCBS oxoid )

Staining reagents )

Urea )

Malonate )

Optional

29. Tintometer for colour comparison (colour comparator) US$ 900

30. TVBN testing apparatus (Distillation set) US$ 300

31. BOD incubator (0-50oC) US$ 400

32. Laminar flow cabinet (2'x2'x2') US$ 2000

- One year supply for a medium scale plant laboratory

Note : Laboratory equipments prices can vary several fold depending on the country of origin. An attempt has been made to quantify the costs of some major equipment.