CFS:2005/3


COMMITTEE ON WORLD FOOD SECURITY

Thirty-first Session

Rome, 23 – 26 May 2005

REPORTING FORMAT FOR THE FOLLOW-UP
OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE WORLD FOOD SUMMIT PLAN OF ACTION

Table of Contents



 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The 30th Session of Committee on World Food Security decided that the Secretariat should convene a regionally balanced working group of experts to review various options ...to improve the format of the Report on the progress of the Word Food Summit Plan of Action, including reducing the frequency of reporting, avoiding duplication of information on indicators by using existing international databases and formulate a set of key indicators. Following such review, the Secretariat should prepare a revised format for consideration by the Bureau

A group of experts met at FAO Headquarters from 24 to 25 February 2005 and their recommendations are contained in this document, including a new format, as well as a set of indicators and guidelines for the frequency and the preparation of national reports.

The Committee may wish to consider adopting the recommendations of the experts.
 

 

I. INTRODUCTION

1. According to the World Food Summit (WFS) Plan of Action, the responsibility for monitoring and reporting on the implementation lies with the Committee on World Food Security (CFS). Three streams of reports are sent to the CFS Secretariat – reports from national governments, reports on UN agency follow-up and inter-agency coordination, and reports from other relevant international institutions.

2. A provisional reporting procedure was used in 1997, for the first Report on Progress in the Implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action. This was followed by an Open-ended Working Group which presented a second reporting format to the CFS in June 1998. A refined version of this reporting format was subsequently presented to the CFS in May 1999 and was sent to member countries for use in preparing the second and third Reports on Progress made in the Plan of Action, in 2000 and 2002.

3. In June 2003, at the 124th Session of the FAO Council, some members of the CFS put forward a proposal to improve the Reporting Format. The objective was to develop better country reports which could illustrate best practices in the case of success and indicate possible reasons for slow progress in cases where the implementation process and results were less impressive. This Revised Reporting Format was developed in consultation with the CFS Bureau, and submitted to the 125th Session of the FAO Council in November 2003. The Council approved its use and recommended a more detailed discussion by the CFS at its 30th Session in 2004.

4. Based on the experience in the preparation of the fourth Report on Progress made, some delegates at the 2004 Session of the CFS put forward a number of proposals to further improve the format. It had been noted that completing the list of indicators included in the report was difficult for many countries and in addition, many of the indicators requested were already available in international databases.

5. It was proposed to reduce the frequency of reporting, formulate a key set of indicators, focus on priority issues and include indicators on water and other natural resources. In addition, delegates recommended that the work of the Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information and Mapping Systems (FIVIMS) should contribute to the development of an appropriate analytical methodology and selection of food security indicators for the World Food Summit reporting process.

6. The Committee took note of these proposals and agreed that the Secretariat should convene a regionally balanced working group of experts to review various options. Following such review, the Secretariat should prepare a revised format for consideration by the Bureau.

7. Subsequently, the Statistics Division, in collaboration with the CFS Secretariat, organized a two-day Expert Working Group (EWG) meeting at FAO Headquarters on 24-25 February 2005. National experts from 11 countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America, North America and Europe participated; their travel and stay in Rome were funded by the FAO-Netherlands Partnership Programme (FNPP). In addition, two members of the FIVIMS Inter-Agency Working Group (from World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)) actively contributed to the EWG meeting discussions. Eurostat, the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Italian National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) were unfortunately unable to attend the meeting. The list of participants is presented as Annex III.

8. The main objective of the work of the EWG was to facilitate the reporting mechanism and to ensure an appropriate use of relevant indicators, avoiding unnecessary duplication of effort on the part of the countries. The work of the EWG referred to the technical and background documents prepared by FAO (see Annex IV). Discussions were focused on changes to the structure of the country reports to CFS and included the framework and criteria for the definition of the key set of indicators. Afterwards, the discussions related to the analysis of key statistical indicators for each of the seven commitments in the World Food Summit Plan of Action. Finally, an overall review of the proposal was undertaken, together with discussions on the global reporting format.

9. The outputs of the EWG are:

    1. a Revised Reporting Format, presented as Annex I; and
    2. guidelines to be provided to countries to facilitate the preparation of the report (Annex II), including the identification of a set of key indicators relevant for monitoring the implementation of the Plan of Action and the progress made in reaching the World Food Summit target.

10. The main recommendations of the EWG are presented below.

II. PROPOSED REPORTING FORMAT

A. MAIN FEATURES

11. The proposed Reporting Format has one cover page and three sections. The substantial part of the report is Sections I and II. Section III contains the indicators and acts as a supporting tool for the narrative of Sections I and II.

12. Section I refers to progress made in reaching the World Food Summit target and the priority food security issues in each country. Countries can report on any relevant programme or project evaluation available, in particular those referring to successful initiatives. In addition, countries can provide relevant information on external assistance programmes and their impact on hunger and lessons learned.

13. Section II deals with the implementation of the commitments in the World Food Summit Plan of Action. For each commitment, the goal and objectives are listed for ease of reference. This is followed by an empty box where the country can enter narrative about policies, strategies or initiatives, and their outcome. In addition, an empty table to be filled with a list of the most important actions undertaken, and the year of initiation, and the current status for the commitment has been included.

14. The main purpose of Section III is to provide support to the narrative of the previous sections through the use of selected key statistical indicators. To facilitate the identification of those indicators, the EWG has prepared a list of recommended indicators. A country may include all of them in its report or select the most appropriate ones. If information is available, the indicators should be broken down by rural/urban and male/female. The figures available in international databases for each indicator will be provided to countries along with the report format. Countries can therefore choose whether to provide their own figures, or refer instead to the ones in the international databases.

B. MAIN CHANGES WITH RESPECT TO THE CURRENT REPORTING FORMAT

15. The proposed Reporting Format introduces substantial changes to the structure of the current one:

C. GUIDELINES FOR THE PREPARATION OF THE COUNTRY REPORT

16. The EWG recommends that a separate document (Annex II) be provided to countries as support for the preparation of the report. This document would contain: (i) general guidelines and (ii) the list of suggested indicators, including their definitions and potential sources.

17. The EWG considers that appropriate country coordination and good communication are essential for an adequate reporting system. In this sense, it is recommended that the national institution or inter-institutional mechanism responsible for preparing the report be clearly identified, and that a national focal point to liaise with the CFS Secretariat be nominated.

III. TESTING THE NEW REPORTING FORMAT

18. The EWG recommends conducting a test in selected countries before worldwide implementation of the new report format. The test would allow introducing final adjustments.

IV. REPORTING FREQUENCY

19. The EWG agreed that the preparation of the first year’s report using the proposed format should receive strong support from the national authorities. In subsequent reports it is suggested that countries give details only on significant changes and new information. Furthermore, the EWG supported to maintain the existing frequency of reporting every two years.

 

ANNEX I

FOLLOW-UP OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
WORLD FOOD SUMMIT PLAN OF ACTION
NATIONAL REPORT

The WFS Plan of Action under Commitment Seven ( Objective 7.3) called upon governments in partnership with all actors of civil society, in coordination with relevant international institutions and, in conformity with ECOSOC Resolution 1996/36 on the follow-up to the major international UN conferences and summits, inter-alia, to :

This Report documents the country progress in the implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action. It consists of three sections. Sections I and II constitute the substantive parts of the Report on progress made, policies adopted and actions taken. In particular, Section II deals with actions and measures taken by the country for each of the seven Commitments under the Plan of Action. Section III provides information on a set of indicators to support the analysis presented in the previous sections.

Country:

 

Date of Report:

 

 

Institution or committee responsible for reporting

 

 

 

 

 

 

Focal Point

Name

 

Position

 

Telephone

 

Fax

 

E-mail

 

Section I: Priority Food Security Issues and Progress Towards the World Food Summit Goal

Section II: Follow up of the WFS Plan of Action

Commitment One
Commitment Two
Commitment Three
Commitment Four
Commitment Five
Commitment Six
Commitment Seven

Section III: Statistical Indicators


The state of the country’s food security situation, in terms of food availability, stability of supplies and access to food and the progress in reaching the hunger reduction targets are described below:

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Available programme or project evaluation studies are attached to this report and listed below:

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Information on external assistance programmes, including a description of their impact on hunger reduction and lessons learned, is given below:

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]

 

This section describes the actions taken under each of the seven Commitments adopted at the World Food Summit. Information is included on policies pursued and/or action programmes implemented with respect to each commitment, demonstrating, where possible, their impact in terms of contributing to overall social and economic development, poverty alleviation and hunger reduction.

Commitment One

We will ensure an enabling political, social, and economic environment designed to create the best conditions for the eradication of poverty and for durable peace, based on full and equal participation of women and men, which is most conducive to achieving sustainable food security for all..

Objective 1.1: To prevent and resolve conflicts peacefully and create a stable political environment, through respect for all human rights and fundamental freedoms, democracy, a transparent and effective legal framework, transparent and accountable governance and administration in all public and private national and international institutions, and effective and equal participation of all people, at all levels, in decisions and actions that affect their food security.

Objective 1.2: To ensure stable economic conditions and implement development strategies which encourage the full potential of private and public, individual and collective initiatives for sustainable, equitable, economic and social development which also integrate population and environmental concerns.

Objective 1.3: To ensure gender equality and empowerment of women.

Objective 1.4: To encourage national solidarity and provide equal opportunities for all, at all levels, in social, economic and political life, particularly in respect of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups and persons.


Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment One:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment One, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Two

We will implement policies aimed at eradicating poverty and inequality and improving physical and economic access by all, at all times, to sufficient, nutritionally adequate and safe food and its effective utilization.

Objective 2.1: To pursue poverty eradication, among both urban and rural poor, and sustainable food security for all as a policy priority and to promote, through sound national policies, secure and gainful employment and equitable and equal access to productive resources such as land, water and credit, so as to maximize the incomes of the poor.

Objective 2.2: To enable food insecure households, families and individuals to meet their food and nutritional requirements and to seek to assist those who are unable to do so.

Objective 2.3: To ensure that food supplies are safe, physically and economically accessible, appropriate and adequate to meet the energy and nutrient needs of the population.

Objective 2.4: To promote access for all, especially the poor and members of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, to basic education and primary health care provision in order to strengthen their capacity for self-reliance.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Two:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Two, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Three

We will pursue participatory and sustainable food, agriculture, fisheries, forestry and rural development policies and practices in high and low potential areas, which are essential to adequate and reliable food supplies at the household, national, regional and global levels, and combat pests, drought and desertification, considering the multifunctional character of agriculture.

Objective 3.1: To pursue, through participatory means, sustainable, intensified and diversified food production, increasing productivity, efficiency, safety gains, pest control and reduced wastes and losses, taking fully into account the need to sustain natural resources.

Objective 3.2: To combat environmental threats to food security, in particular, drought and desertification, pests, erosion of biological diversity, and degradation of land and aquatic-based natural resources, restore and rehabilitate the natural resource base, including water and watersheds, in depleted and overexploited areas to achieve greater production.

Objective 3.3: To promote sound policies and programmes on transfer and use of technologies, skills development and training appropriate to the food security needs of developing countries and compatible with sustainable development, particularly in rural and disadvantaged areas.

Objective 3.4: To take decisive action in cooperation between the public and the private sectors to strengthen and broaden research and scientific cooperation in agriculture, fisheries and forestry in supporting policy and international, regional, national and local action to increase productive potential and maintain the natural resource base in agriculture, fisheries and forestry and in support of efforts to eradicate poverty and promote food security.

Objective 3.5: To formulate and implement integrated rural development strategies, in low and high potential areas, that promote rural employment, skill formation, infrastructure, institutions and services, in support of rural development and household food security and that reinforce the local productive capacity of farmers, fishers and foresters and others actively involved in the food sector, including members of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, women and indigenous people, and their representative organizations, and that ensure their effective participation.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Three:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Three, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Four

We will strive to ensure that food, agricultural trade and overall trade policies are conducive to fostering food security for all through a fair and market-oriented world trade system.

Objective 4.1: To meet the challenges of and utilize the opportunities arising from the international trade framework established in recent global and regional trade negotiations.

Objective 4.2: To meet essential food import needs in all countries, considering world price and supply fluctuations and taking especially into account food consumption levels of vulnerable groups in developing countries.

Objective 4.3: To support the continuation of the reform process in conformity with the Uruguay Round Agreement, particularly Article 20 of the Agreement on Agriculture.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Four:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Four, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Five

We will endeavour to prevent and be prepared for natural disasters and man-made emergencies and to meet transitory and emergency food requirements in ways that encourage recovery, rehabilitation, development and a capacity to satisfy future needs.

Objective 5.1: To reduce demands for emergency food assistance through enhancing efforts to prevent and resolve man-made emergencies, particularly international, national and local conflicts.

Objective 5.2: To establish as quickly as possible prevention and preparedness strategies for LIFDCs and other countries and regions vulnerable to emergencies.

Objective 5.3: To improve and, if necessary, develop efficient and effective emergency response mechanisms at international, regional, national and local levels.

Objective 5.4: To strengthen linkages between relief operations and development programmes, along with demining activities where necessary, so that they are mutually supportive and facilitate the transition from relief to development.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Five:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Five, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Six

We will promote optimal allocation and use of public and private investments to foster human resources, sustainable food, agriculture, fisheries and forestry systems, and rural development, in high and low potential areas.

Objective 6.1: To create the policy framework and conditions so that optimal public and private investments are encouraged in equitable and sustainable development of the food systems, rural development and human resources on the scale needed to contribute to food security.

Objective 6.2: To endeavour to mobilize, and optimize the use of, technical and financial resources from all sources, including debt relief, in order to raise investment in activities related to sustainable agriculture, fisheries, forestry and food production in developing countries to the levels needed to contribute to food security.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Six:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Six, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]


Commitment Seven

We will implement, monitor, and follow-up this Plan of Action at all levels in cooperation with the international community.

Objective 7.1: To adopt actions within each country's national framework to enhance food security and enable the implementation of the commitments of the World Food Summit Plan of Action.

Objective 7.2: To improve sub-regional, regional, and international cooperation and to mobilize, and optimize the use of, available resources to support national efforts for the earliest possible achievement of sustainable world food security.

Objective 7.3: To monitor actively the implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action.

Objective 7.4: To clarify the content of the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, as stated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and other relevant international and regional instruments, and to give particular attention to implementation and full and progressive realization of this right as a means of achieving food security for all.

Objective 7.5: To share responsibilities in achieving food security for all so that implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action takes place at the lowest possible level at which its purpose could be best achieved.

Summary list of the most important actions taken under Commitment Seven:

Action

Year Initiated

Status

1.

   

2.

   

3.

   

4.

   

5.

   

[add more rows if needed]

The policies, strategies and initiatives implemented under Commitment Seven, and their outcomes, are described below.

[enter text here]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[add more space if needed]

 

Section III: Statistical Indicators

The indicators which illustrate the most relevant actions and changes in the country situation are shown in Table 1. For each indicator used to support the narrative, it has been specified if the preferred source was national sources or international databases. Statistics for internationally available indicators have been compiled and provided by FAO Statistics Division. Figures for indicators from national sources are presented in Table 2.

Table 1: List of recommended indicators

Source (N, I, X)*

Food Deprivation and Child Malnutrition

 

1. Estimated number of undernourished people

 

2. Percentage of population undernourished

 

3. Percentage of children under 5 that are underweight

 

4. Percentage of children under 5 that are stunted

 

5. Percentage of children under 5 that are wasted

 

Food Consumption and Diet Diversification

 

6. Dietary energy supply per person

 

7. Share of non-starchy food in total dietary energy supply

 

Economic Growth, Poverty and Employment

 

8. GDP per capita growth (annual %)

 

9. Poverty headcount, national (% of population)

 

10. Employment rate

 

11. Total debt service (% of GNI)

 

Education and Gender Equality

 

12. Net enrolment ratio in primary education

 

13. Public expenditure on education as percentage of GDP

 

14. Girls to boys ratio, primary level enrolment

 

15. Girls to boys ratio, secondary level enrolment

 

16. Girls to boys ratio, tertiary level enrolment

 

17. Proportion of seats held by women in national parliament/congress

 

Health and Sanitation

 

18. Percentage of population with access to improved sanitation facilities

 

19. Percentage of population with access to an improved water source

 

20. Estimated percentage number of people living with HIV

 

Agricultural Development

 

21. Agriculture, value added (annual % growth)

 

22. Food production index

 

23. Government expenditure allocated to agriculture and rural development (%)

 

24. Government expenditure allocated to research and extension in agricultural technology (%)

 

Water, Natural Resources and Infrastructure

 

25. Irrigated land as % of agricultural area

 

26. Forest area as % of total land area

 

27. Severely degraded land as % of total area

 

28. Roads, paved (% of total roads)

 

Trade and National Debt

 

29. Terms of trade (base period=100)

 

30. ODA provided <for donor country> or received <for recipient country> to help build trade capacity

 

31. Agricultural support estimate for OECD countries as percentage of their Agricultural GDP

 

Development Assistance

 

32. ODA, net, as percentage of OECD donor’s GNI

 

33. External assistance to agriculture provided <for donor countries> or received <for recipient countries> (US$)

 

* National (N); International Databases (I); Not used (X)

Table 2: Statistics from national sources (from 1990)

Year

Value

Name:

     

Unit:

     

Definition:

     

Source:

     
       

Name:

     

Unit:

     

Definition:

     

Source:

     
       

Name:

     

Unit:

     

Definition:

     

Source:

     
       

Name:

     

Unit:

     

Definition:

     

Source:

     

[Create additional rows to include more indicators or additional years in the table]

 

ANNEX II

These guidelines have been prepared to facilitate the reporting exercise. For any clarification countries may wish to contact the CFS Secretariat at the following address:

Ms. Margarita Flores
Chief, Food Security and Agricultural Projects Analysis Service (ESAF)
FAO
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
Rome, Italy
tel. (39) 06 57056566
e-mail: margarita.flores@fao.org

Report Preparation

The preparation of the first year’s report using the new format will require strong support from the national authorities. In subsequent reports it is suggested that countries give details only on significant changes and new information. The report will be prepared and submitted to the CFS Secretariat every two years.

Cover page

All information on this page is required. Countries should specify the date of the report and clearly identify the name of the institution or institutional body responsible for reporting. In addition, in order to facilitate coordination and communication, a national focal point to liaise with the CFS Secretariat should be nominated.

Section I: Priority Food Security Issues and Progress Towards the World Food Summit Goal

This section has 3 boxes to enter text on: (i) description of food security situation and progress towards the World Food Summit goal; (ii) list of available evaluation studies (the studies should be attached to the report); and (iii) information on external assistance programmes.

Section II: Follow-up of the World Food Summit Plan of Action

With regards to each of the seven commitments in the Plan of Action, countries are requested to list any policies, strategies and initiatives implemented, any outcomes; and also the most important actions undertaken. For the actions, the year of initiation should be specified along with the current status of the action for the commitment (e.g., completed, ongoing, cancelled). Please add more pages and/or actions as required.

Developed countries are requested to report on their policies and activities undertaken for each commitment conducive to the achievement of the World Food Summit goal in developing countries.

Section III: Statistical Indicators

If possible, indicators should be broken down into rural/urban and male/female.

Table 1 contains a list of indicators used to illustrate the most relevant actions and changes in the country situation. The country should specify, for each indicator, if the preferred source of data was national (N), international databases (I) or if the indicator was not used for the report (X).

FAO Statistics Division has compiled and attached a table giving all data for these indicators which are readily available in international databases.

If the country prefers to use national sources for data, then Table 2 of the report should be filled in for each indicator. Information is requested on name, unit, definition and source, along with values for all available years since 1990. The time series data for each indicator should refer to a consistent definition and be extracted from a single source, to ensure comparability over time.

Some indicators are not available in international databases. If countries wish to include data for these indicators, then they should do so in Table 2.

Countries may wish to add indicators not included in Table 1.

Recommended Statistical Indicators – Definitions and Sources

Food Deprivation and Child Malnutrition

Name:

Estimated number of undernourished people

Unit:

Millions

Definition:

Undernourishment refers to the condition of people whose dietary energy intake is below that needed for maintaining a healthy and active life. The undernourished refers to those in this condition.

The number of persons undernourished is obtained by multiplying estimates of the proportion of undernourished for each country by estimates of the total population.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Percentage of population undernourished

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Undernourishment refers to the condition of people whose dietary energy intake is below that needed for maintaining a healthy and active life. The undernourished refers to those in this condition.

The percentage of population undernourished refers to the proportion of the population undernourished.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Percentage of children under 5 that are underweight

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Proportion of under-fives falling below minus 2 standard deviations (moderate underweight) and minus 3 standard deviations (severe underweight) from the median weight-for-age of the reference population recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Source:

WHO

 

Name:

Percentage of children under 5 that are stunted

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Proportion of under-fives falling below minus 2 and minus 3 standard deviations from the median height-for-age of the reference population recognised by WHO.

Source:

WHO

 

Name:

Percentage of children under 5 that are wasted

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Proportion of under-fives falling below minus 2 and minus 3 standard deviations from the median weight-for-height of the reference population recognised by WHO.

Source:

WHO


Food Consumption and Diet Diversification

Name:

Dietary energy supply (DES) per person

Unit:

Kilocalories per person per day

Definition:

Food available for human consumption, expressed in kilocalories (kcal) per person per day. At the country level, it is calculated as the food remaining for human use after the deduction of all non-food consumption (exports, industrial use and wastage).

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Share of non-starchy foods in total dietary energy supply

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Non-starchy foods comprise all food sources for DES, except cereals and roots and tubers.

Source:

FAO


Economic Growth, Poverty and Employment

Name:

GDP per capita growth (annual %)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita based on constant local currency. GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.

Source:

World Bank, World Development Indicators

 

Name:

Poverty headcount, national (% of population)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

National poverty rate is the percentage of the population living below the national poverty line. National estimates are based on population-weighted sub-group estimates from household surveys.

Source:

World Bank, World Development Indicators

 

Name:

Employment rate

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

The employment series cover, in principle, all major divisions of economic activity and all sectors of activity. They refer, as far as is possible, to all status categories of persons in employment. For certain series some component categories may not be fully represented. National definitions of employment may in a number of cases differ from the recommended international standard definition.

Source:

International Labour Organisation (ILO)

 

Name:

Total debt service (% of GNI)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Total debt service is the sum of principal repayments and interest actually paid in foreign currency, goods, or services on long-term debt, interest paid on short-term debt, and repayments (repurchases and charges) to the IMF.

Source:

World Bank, World Development Indicators


Education and Gender Equality

Name:

Net enrolment ratio in primary education

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Enrolment of the theoretical school-age group for a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the total population in that age-group.

Source:

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

 

Name:

Public expenditure on education as percentage of GDP

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Current and capital expenditures on education by local, regional and national governments, including municipalities (household contributions are excluded), expressed as a percentage of the GDP.

Source:

UNESCO

 

Name:

Girls to boys ratio, primary level enrolment

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Education enrolment refers to persons enrolled and/or registered in a programme of education.

Source:

UNESCO

 

Name:

Girls to boys ratio, secondary level enrolment

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Education enrolment refers to persons enrolled and/or registered in a programme of education.

Source:

UNESCO

 

Name:

Girls to boys ratio, tertiary level enrolment

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Education enrolment refers to persons enrolled and/or registered in a programme of education.

Source:

UNESCO

 

Name:

Proportion of seats held by women in national parliament/congress

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Data refer to the situation of women in the lower or single house of the national parliaments at January of the year indicated.

Source:

Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU)


Health and Sanitation

Name:

Percentage of population with access to improved sanitation facilities

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate excreta disposal facilities (private or shared, but not public) that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained.

Source:

WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 Report.

 

Name:

Percentage of population with access to an improved water source

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 litres a person a day from a source within one kilometre of the dwelling.

Source:

WHO and UNICEF, Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 Report.

 

Name:

Estimated percentage number of people living with HIV

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Share of total population infected by HIV.

Source:

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)


Agricultural Development

Name:

Agriculture, value added (annual % growth)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Annual growth rate for agricultural value added based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Agriculture corresponds to ISIC divisions 1-5 and includes forestry, hunting, and fishing, as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3.

Source:

World Bank, World Development Indicators

 

Name:

Food production index

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

The food production index covers food crops that are considered edible and that contain nutrients. Coffee and tea are excluded because, although edible, they have no nutritive value. The FAO indices of food production show the relative level of the aggregate volume of food production for each year in comparison with the base period 1999-2001.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Government expenditure allocated to agricultural and rural development (% of total)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Data on government expenditure on agriculture refers to all non-repayable payments, whether capital or current, requited or not by government for the agricultural and rural development sector.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Government expenditure allocated to research and development for agriculture, forestry, fishery and hunting (% of total)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Data on government expenditure refers to all non-repayable payments, whether capital or current, requited or not by government

Source:

NOT AVAILABLE IN INTERNATIONAL DATABASES


Water, Natural Resources and Infrastructure

Name:

Irrigated land as % of agricultural area

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Data on irrigation relate to areas equipped to provide water to the crops. These include areas equipped for full and partial control irrigation, spate irrigation areas, and equipped wetland or inland valley bottoms. Agricultural area refers to: (a) arable land - land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category. Data for arable land are not meant to indicate the amount of land that is potentially cultivable; and (b) permanent crops - land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee and rubber; this category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Forest area as % of total land area

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Forest area is defined as land spanning more than 0.5 hectares with trees higher than 5 meters and a canopy cover of more than 10%, or trees able to reach these thresholds in situ. It does not include land that is predominantly under agricultural or urban land use.

Total land area comprises agricultural land, forest and other wooded land, built-up and related land (excluding scattered farm buildings), wet open land, dry open land with special vegetation cover and open land without, or with insignificant, vegetation cover.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Severely degraded land as % of total area

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Land degradation refers to the temporary or permanent reduction in the productive capacity of land as a result of human action. Soil degradation severity is obtained by combining the degree of degradation with its spatial extent.

Source:

FAO

 

Name:

Roads, paved (% of total roads)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Paved roads are those surfaced with crushed stone (macadam) and hydrocarbon binder or bituminized agents, with concrete, or with cobblestones, as a percentage of all the country’s roads, measured in length.

Source:

World Bank, World Development Indicators (from International Road Federation, World Road Statistics)


Trade and National Debt

Name:

Terms of trade (base period = 100)

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

The so-called ''net barter'' terms of trade, defined as the ratio of the export unit value index to the import unit value index.

Source:

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Handbook of Statistics

 

Name:

Official Development Assistance (ODA) provided to help build trade capacity

Unit:

United States Dollars

Definition:

ODA: Those flows to developing countries and multilateral institutions provided by official agencies, including state and local governments, or by their executive agencies, each transaction of which meets the following tests: (a) it is administered with the promotion of the economic development and welfare of developing countries as its main objective; and (b) it is concessional in character and conveys a grant element of at least 25%.

Trade related and technical assistance capacity building expenditure (TRTA/CB): For the purposes of data collection, defined as activities that intend to enhance the ability of the recipient country to: formulate and implement a trade development strategy and create an enabling environment for increasing the volume and value-added of exports, diversifying export products and markets and increasing foreign investment to generate jobs and trade; or stimulate trade by domestic firms and encourage investment in trade-oriented industries; or participate in and benefit from the institutions, negotiations and processes that shape national trade policy and the rules and practices of international commerce. Activities were further classified under two main categories. Trade policy and regulations covers support to aid recipients' effective participation in multilateral trade negotiations, analysis and implementation of multilateral trade agreements, trade policy mainstreaming and technical standards, trade facilitation including tariff structures and customs regimes, support to regional trade arrangements and human resources development in trade. Trade development covers business development and activities aimed at improving the business climate, access to trade finance, and trade promotion in the productive sectors (agriculture, forestry, fishing, industry, mining, tourism), including at the institutional and enterprise level. Activities to enhance the infrastructure necessary for trade -- transport, storage, communications and energy -- were excluded from the data collection.

Source:

WTO, OECD

 

Name:

Official Development Assistance (ODA) received to help build trade capacity

Unit:

United States Dollars

Definition:

ODA: Those flows to developing countries and multilateral institutions provided by official agencies, including state and local governments, or by their executive agencies, each transaction of which meets the following tests: (a) it is administered with the promotion of the economic development and welfare of developing countries as its main objective; and (b) it is concessional in character and conveys a grant element of at least 25%.

Trade related and technical assistance capacity building expenditure (TRTA/CB): For the purposes of data collection, defined as activities that intend to enhance the ability of the recipient country to: formulate and implement a trade development strategy and create an enabling environment for increasing the volume and value-added of exports, diversifying export products and markets and increasing foreign investment to generate jobs and trade; or stimulate trade by domestic firms and encourage investment in trade-oriented industries; or participate in and benefit from the institutions, negotiations and processes that shape national trade policy and the rules and practices of international commerce. Activities were further classified under two main categories. Trade policy and regulations covers support to aid recipients' effective participation in multilateral trade negotiations, analysis and implementation of multilateral trade agreements, trade policy mainstreaming and technical standards, trade facilitation including tariff structures and customs regimes, support to regional trade arrangements and human resources development in trade. Trade development covers business development and activities aimed at improving the business climate, access to trade finance, and trade promotion in the productive sectors (agriculture, forestry, fishing, industry, mining, tourism), including at the institutional and enterprise level. Activities to enhance the infrastructure necessary for trade -- transport, storage, communications and energy -- were excluded from the data collection.

Trade classifications under general trade include: (i) trade policy and administrative management; (ii) trade facilitation; (iii) regional trade agreements; (iv) multilateral trade negotiations; and (v) trade education training.

Source:

NOT AVAILABLE IN INTERNATIONAL DATABASES

 

Name:

Agricultural support estimate for OECD countries as percentage of their Agricultural GDP

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Agriculture, total support estimates: The annual monetary value of all gross transfers from taxpayers and consumers arising from policy measures that support agriculture, net of the associated budgetary receipts, regardless of their objectives and impacts on farm production and income, or consumption of farm products.

Source:

OECD


Development Assistance

Name:

ODA, net, as percentage of OECD/DAC donor’s GNI

Unit:

Percentage

Definition:

Development assistance, official: Grants or loans to developing countries and territories of the OECD/Development Assistance Committee list of Aid Recipients which are undertaken by the official sector with promotion of economic development and welfare as the main objective, and at concessional financial terms (if a loan, having a grant element of at least 25%). Technical co-operation is included. Grants, loans and credits for military purposes are excluded. Also excluded are aid to "Central and Eastern European Countries and New Independent States of the former Soviet Union" or "more advanced developing countries and territories" as determined by the OECD Development Assistance Committee.

Source:

OECD

 

Name:

Total External Assistance to Agriculture (EAA) provided or received

Unit:

Millions of United States Dollars

Definition:

This refers to the concessional and non-concessional commitments made by bilateral and multilateral donors to developing countries, and some developed countries entitled to Official Assistance. It is given for the development of agriculture in the broad sense, which includes: land and water, research, training and extension, inputs, agricultural services, crop production, livestock, fisheries, forestry, agriculture, environment protection, rural development/infrastructure, manufacturing of inputs, regional and river development, and agro-industries.

Source:

FAO

 

ANNEX III

Participants

China Dr Shudong Zhou
Professor
Director of Agricultural Economics Department
College of Economics & Management
Nanjing Agricultural University
210095 Nanjing
tel +86-25-8439-6289 (O); tel & fax +86-25-8439-5517 (H)
sdzhou@njau.edu.cn
India Dr Swarna Vepa
Programme Director (Food Security)
Centre for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development
M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation
3rd Cross Street, Institutional Area
Taramani, Chennai 600 113
tel +91-44-22542698 / 1229; fax +91-44-22541319
hmrc@mssrf.res.in
Mexico Mr Gerardo Leyva-Parra
Deputy General Director
Economic Statistics
Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática
Av. Heroe de Nacozari Sur 2301
Puerta 3 - Nivel 1
Fracc. Jardines del Parque
20170 Aguascalientes, Ags.,
tel (449) 910-5313; fax (449) 918-27 36
gerardo.leyva@inegi.gob.mx
Morocco Dr Hassan Serghini
Director, Direction of Planning and Economic Affairs
Ministry of Agriculture
Rabat
tel (212) 37 69 84 07 / 08; fax (212) 37 69 84 01
serghini@dpae.madrpm.gov.ma
Philippines Mr Romulo Virola
Secretary General, National Statistical Coordination Board
1st, 2nd & 5th fls. Midland, Buendia Bldg
403 Sen. Gil. J. Puyat Av. Extension
Makati City 1200
tel (632) 897 2171; fax (632) 896 1778
ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph
Senegal Mr Mamadou Wane
Head of Agricultural Statistics
Ministère de l’agriculture et de l’hydraulique
Direction de l'Analyse, de la Prévision et des Statistiques
Dakar
tel (221) 864 64 69/864 64 13; fax (221) 864 64 71
spsar@telecomplus.sn
, mamwane@yahoo.com
Sudan Mr Mustafa Hassan Ali
Central Bureau of Statistics
PO Box 700, Khartoum
tel (249) 11 77 71 31; fax (249) 11 77 18 60
CBS@sudanmail.net
, elsir@mail.com
Tanzania Mr Said Aboud
Manager, Demographic and Social Statistics
National Bureau of Statistics
P.O. Box 796, Dar-es-Salam
tel (255) 22 2135602 / 74 4373581; fax (255) 22 2130852
census@raha.com
Uruguay Dr Miguel Galmés
Decano, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y de Administración
Universidad de la República
Montevideo
tel (598) 2 4102274 / 4125195
mgalmes@ccee.edu.uy
USA Ms Shahla Shapouri, USDA
SDA/Economic Research Service
1800 M Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
tel (202) 694-516
Shahla.Shapouri@usda.gov
Zambia Mr Goodson Sinyenga
Ag. Principal Statistician
Central Statistics Office
Lusaka
tel (260-1) 2533468; fax (260-1) 253468 / 253609
gsinyenga@zamststs.gov.zm
, gsinyenga@yahoo.co.uk

FIVIMS Inter-agency Working Group

Ms Lynn Brown
Chair of the FIVIMS IAWG
PSP Division - World Food Programme
Via Cesare Giulio Viola 68/70 - Parco dei Medici
00148 Rome
tel (39) 06 6513-3240
lynn.brown@wfp.org

Mr Sean Kennedy
Technical Advisor, Human Health and Nutrition
IFAD - Via del Serafico, 107
00142 Rome
tel (39) 06 5459 2514
s.kennedy@ifad.org

FAO - Food Security and Agricultural Projects Analysis Service (ESAF)

Mr Amdetsion Gebre-Michael
Senior Economist, Food Security
tel (39) 06 57054337
amdetsion.gebremichael@fao.org

Meeting organizers - Socio-economic Statistics and Analysis Service (ESSA)

Mr Jorge Mernies
Chief, ESSA
Statistics Division, FAO Rome
tel (39) 06 57056573
jorge.mernies@fao.org

Mr Ricardo Sibrian
Senior Statistician, ESSA
tel (39) 06 57052112
ricardo.sibrian@fao.org

Preparation of background and technical materials

Ms Amanda Gordon (Co-ordinator)
Statistician, ESSA

Mr Seeva Ramasawmy
Statistician, ESSA

Ms Cinzia Cerri
Statistician, ESSA

Mr Kari Juhani Rummukainen
Research Assistant, ESSA

Mr Francesco Vizioli de Meo
Statistical Clerk, ESSA

Mr Pierre Castagnoli
Information Clerk, ESSA

Administrative support

Ms Gianna Marciani-Politi
Secretary, ESSA

 

ANNEX IV

A) Background Information on Country Reporting Format to CFS

  1. Background Information to the World Food Summit Plan of Action and Reporting Format
  2. Revised Reporting Format – February 2005
  3. Current Reporting Format
  4. Committee on World Food Security, September 2004 – Revised Reporting Format for the Follow-up of the Implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action (CFS: 2004/5)
  5. FAO Council, November 2004 - Report of the 30th Session of the CFS, September 2004 (Sections III and IV (a)) (CL 127/10)
  6. FAO Council, November 2003: The Reporting Format for the World Food Summit Follow-up (Submitted by CFS) (CL 125/6)
  7. Committee on World Food Security, May 1999 – Reporting Format for Monitoring the Implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action (CFS: 99/4)
  8. Committee on World Food Security, Open-ended Working Group, June 1998 - Possible Approaches and Draft Reporting Format for Monitoring Progress in the Implementation of the World Food Summit Plan of Action (CFS: 98/6)
  9. World Food Summit, November 1996 - Rome Declaration on World Food Security

B) Reference Documents on Statistical Indicators

  1. FIVIMS – Making FIVIMS Work for You: Tools and Tips - FAO, 2002
  2. Indicators for Monitoring the Millennium Development Goals - UN, 2003
  3. List of World Development Indicators 2004 Time Series Indicators – The World Bank, 2004
  4. Summary of World Food and Agricultural Statistics 2003 – FAO Statistics Division
  5. Compendium of Food and Agriculture Indicators 2001 – FAO Statistics Division
  6. The State of Food Insecurity in the World (SOFI), 2000 – 2004 - FAO