Previous PageTable of ContentsNext Page

Overview of Proposals

Approach to Priority Setting

208.     The approach for overall planning and management of Regular Programme resources includes three areas of scrutiny:

  • the search for greater efficiencies, cost recovery improvements and productivity gains in programme delivery across the entire Organization, as spelled out in the corresponding section above;
  • the opportunities to minimise the cost of delivering non-technical programmes, for instance general policy, governance, administration and common services. Results-based principles have been applied for the first time to non-technical programmes and technical cooperation areas in the Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2006-11 and pursued in this PWB. The discipline of auto-evaluation is also progressively applied to these programmes, improving the capacity to identify areas for programme and resource adjustments; and
  • with respect to the technical and economic activities, priorities first come into play in the major formulation effort which occurs in the development of the MTP, where criteria analysis is used to determine the priority to be accorded to the programme entities that will contribute to the achievement of the strategic objectives.
209.     The three criteria in the first category are those more relevant to informing the process of allocating resources in any scenario. Based on the scores of these three criteria, the entities and related planned resources were critically reviewed at the MTP stage. The PWB proposals take account of the substantive balance in the MTP to the maximum extent possible. While this is, of course, easier to do in the context of real growth opportunities, it was nevertheless attempted within the constraints of ZRG and ZNG budget levels.

210.     Four more specific factors were taken into account by senior management, departments and offices in proposing changes to substantive thrusts and resource allocations to programmes and entities within each scenario, recognising, however, that the external environment continues to evolve rapidly:

  • the guidance provided by the Council and its Committees - Programme, Finance, Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Commodity Problems, World Food Security – reflecting the expressed priority of Members on programme and resource allocation priorities;
  • regional areas of emphasis as articulated by the Regional Conferences and factored in to allocation of resources to substantive areas of work in the decentralized offices;
  • identification of activities that could be substantially reduced or eliminated in order to limit programme fragmentation and address areas of insufficient critical mass, drawing attention to the consequent impact; and
  • where appropriate, use of the results of recent independent programme and strategy evaluations and of auto-evaluations in deciding on the future of individual entities.
211.     In developing the ZNG scenario with its large resource decline from ZRG levels, three differentiated priority levels were identified at the programme entity level. These permitted the development of aggregate resource reduction targets at major programme level:

  • highest priorities considered as fully protected, i.e. keeping allocations to present levels; these comprised only a few areas where commitments existed with third parties;
  • high priority areas, generally scoring high on the first category of priority setting criteria, which were partially protected. It is noted that the Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) was only partially protected, although its share of the Appropriation was increased to 14%; and
  • other priority areas, i.e. areas which were required to absorb a higher reduction than the preceding group.

Definition and Import of Resource Scenarios

Definitions
212.     At its 128th session in June 2005 the Council concluded its discussion of the Summary PWB (SPWB) by looking forward to considering in the full PWB proposals on zero real growth (ZRG), real growth (RG), higher real growth (HRG) and zero nominal growth (ZNG). HRG and attendant reform proposals are covered in the separate Supplement.

213.     The Organization’s approach to overall planning and management of Regular Programme resources, as described under the preceding section, is applied to all four resource scenarios and has been used to develop the proposed budgetary allocations and programme proposals. Thus, managers have taken account of potential efficiencies and applied the established priority setting criteria, focusing on the main thrusts and planned achievements approved in the MTP 2006-11, particularly the first biennium of the Plan period, across all locations.

214.     Before turning to a summary of the programme implications, the resource scenarios are defined as follows, together with a short justification for the overall resource levels.

Zero Real Growth
215.     Zero real growth corresponds to the budget level needed to maintain purchasing power of the Organization’s programmes, which requires financial provision for the estimated amount of cost increases. The ZRG scenario establishes the baseline for the other scenarios. Like other organizations of the UN system, FAO has been confronted with escalating costs of security (for both staff and premises) in the aftermath of the events of 11 September 2001. The requirements for security in 2006-07 are US$ 19.4 million, as set forth in the section on Security Expenditure Facility above. The related incremental expenditures since the PWB 2002-03 was prepared, have reached an amount of US$ 10.6 million on a biennial basis. Yet, during this period of substantial security cost escalation, the budget of the Organization has endured a significant real decline, particularly in 2004-05. The inevitable result is that security cost escalation has thus far been absorbed at the expense of the Organization’s substantive programmes.

216.     During the deliberations of the SPWB 2006-07 by the governing bodies, many Members requested that the substantive work of the Organization be protected in the face of mounting security costs. Accordingly, the Director-General proposes that under the new Chapter 9: Security Expenditure, US$ 8.8 million be drawn from various provisions for security budgeted in the PWB 2002-03 and the remaining US$ 10.6 million be funded as an exceptional security cost escalation that has been forced upon the Organization. This approach recognises the responsibility of Members to collectively provide adequate resources for a safe working environment. Moreover, separate incremental funding for security costs has become a customary practice in some other UN organizations, such as the UN and IAEA43.

217.     Therefore, the ZRG budget proposal is adjusted upwards by US$ 10.6 million from a current net budget of US$ 749.1 million to US$ 759.7 million, to reinstate the purchasing power of the Organization’s substantive programmes. This adjustment is applied to: 1) correcting structural under-budgeting (US$ 4.8 million) - resulting from past absorption of security cost increases - in the FAOR network and general policy and common services; 2) providing additional resources (US$ 1.4 million) for high priority areas including the “right to food”, the Secretariat of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (IT-PGRFA) and central support for inter-disciplinary activities; and 3) establishing a higher institutional provision for Capital Expenditures, including the HRMS44 project (US$ 4.5 million).

Real Growth
218.     The Director-General’s Real Growth proposals maintain an absolute level of real growth of US$ 30.9 million before cost increases, as proposed in the SPWB. This is equivalent to an increase beyond ZRG of 2.4% in 2006 and 2.5% in 2007, which corresponds to the average gross domestic product (GDP) growth expected among the major contributors.

219.     The MTP 2006-11, which indicated a budgetary increase of US$ 22.9 million for 2006-07, was used as the starting point for preparing the RG scenario for 2006-07, given that the substantive content was endorsed by the Council at its 127th session in November 2004.

220.     Of the additional US$ 8 million compared with the MTP, US$ 3.5 million would be provided for work on capacity-building in the application of international regulatory frameworks, US$ 0.4 million to provide additional catalytic funding for auto-evaluation under Chapter 1, and US$ 4.1 million to Chapter 8: Capital Expenditure, as shown in Programme Budget Table 2.

Higher Real Growth
221.     The HRG scenario would involve an overall biennial growth rate of 9.25%, as expressly requested by the Council. This amounts to a net increase in the budget beyond ZRG of US$ 70 million, before cost increases. It would thus permit allocation of additional resources amounting to US$ 39 million over the RG scenario, which was considered by many Members as not being commensurate with the requirements of the Membership, particularly in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It is covered in the Supplement to this main document.

Zero Nominal Growth
222.     The ZNG resource level is defined as the programme of work that leads to the same nominal level of net appropriation for the next biennium as the current appropriation, which amounts to US$ 749.1 million in 2004-05. An appropriation of US$ 749.1 million to implement the 2006-07 programme of work, which is planned to continue to be collected through a system of split assessments as approved by the last Conference, therefore, implies that the estimated cost increases (see section on Cost Increases) need to be “absorbed”. This corresponds to an overall real reduction in resources of approximately US$ 44.6 million, or 6.3%. In this scenario, security expenditures have been budgeted at the 2002-03 budget level (US$ 8.8 million). Funding of unbudgeted security expenditures estimated at US$ 10.6 million would be left to decisions of Members.

Import of the scenarios
223.     The programme narratives in Annex I describe, under each chapter and major programme, as appropriate, the substantive thrusts of the baseline ZRG scenario, the additional activities which would be made possible by the RG scenario and the impact of ZNG reductions. As noted above, the areas of emphasis and de-emphasis, and the resulting resource allocations, are based on application of the priority setting criteria and more specific factors including governing body guidance, regional areas of emphasis (as described in Annex II), results of evaluations and efforts to limit fragmentation in a rapidly evolving external environment. A summary of these implications for each scenario is provided below.

Zero Real Growth – Main substantive thrusts
224.     The aggregate budgetary provisions at major programme level for the current biennium were taken as the starting point in establishing the overall resource levels for 2006-07. They were adjusted for areas of structural under-budgeting arising from US$ 51.2 million real reductions imposed in the 2004-05 budget and expressions of high priority including in areas of capital expenditure. The adjustments included the reinstatement of resources for the Finance (AFF) and Policy Assistance (TCA) Divisions requested by the governing bodies in 2004.

225.     In order to maintain continuity between the programme achievements articulated in the MTP 2006-11 (as endorsed by the Council) and the proposals in the PWB, only a few exceptional adjustments to the programme structure have been proposed.

  • Auto-evaluation was introduced in 2004 as a valuable tool for learning and decision- making on individual programme entities. A new, centrally-managed programme entity under Programme 1.2.2: Evaluation is proposed to identify and provide catalytic funding to the units undertaking auto-evaluations.
  • Under Major Programme 2.1: Agricultural Production and Support Systems, the support to the Secretariat of the IT-PGRFA will be provided through a new entity under Programme 2.1.2: Crops, once the first meeting of the governing body for the Treaty has taken place during the biennium.
  • In Major Programme 2.2: Food and Agriculture Policy and Development a new programme entity is established for follow-up action on the Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security.
  • Under Major Programme 2.5: Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts, activities under two entities relating to education and extension are shifted from Programme 2.5.1 to Programmes 2.5.2 and 2.5.3.
  • In order to emphasise the country focus of FAO’s policy work, and to reduce programme fragmentation, some entities under Major Programme 3.1: Policy Assistance have been merged and redesigned.
226.     Under Chapter 1: General Policy and Direction, there is no major change, except for some realignment of resources across programmes in Major Programme 1.1: Governing Bodies and the above-mentioned adjustments to correct for structural under-budgeting in Major Programme 1.2: Policy, Direction and Planning, as well as US$ 0.4 million to support auto-evaluations under Programme 1.2.2: Evaluation.

227.     Major Programme 2.1: Agricultural Production and Support Systems will continue to give priority to supporting standard setting processes and the development of appropriate policy and regulatory frameworks in areas such as plant and animal genetic resources, biotechnology, biosecurity, animal health, and assist with sustainable development and management of natural resources, in particular water. Work on moisture conservation techniques in rainfed areas; disaster mitigation through waterlogging and salinity control and rehabilitation; and related studies and inputs to major fora as well as farm mechanisation, will be de-emphasised, and work on seed networks and weed management will be reduced.

228.     The provision under Programme 2.1.2: Crops is increased by nearly US$ 1 million in connection with the IT-PGRFA including its Secretariat, implementation of the IPPC45 and scientific advice to Codex through shifts from other programmes. EMPRES would initiate work on other transboundary plant pests and diseases beyond the current focus on desert locust. Programme 2.1.3: Livestock will strengthen work on national disease prevention and management systems with priority given to transboundary animal diseases, including those of zoonotic nature such as avian influenza, particularly in the context of the FAO/OIE46 Global Framework for the Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs), under EMPRES47 and through ECTAD48. A major event will be the First International Technical Conference on Animal Genetic Resources in 2007. The catalytic provision to support the work under approved PAIAs49 will be augmented (entity 210S5).

229.     Major Programme 2.2: Food and Agriculture Policy and Development will continue its much valuable leading role in collection and dissemination of information, analytical studies, early warning work and assistance to countries in areas such as: Codex standards and food safety, nutrition improvement, agricultural trade and commodities. The modernised statistical system FAOSTAT50, and its country version CountryStat, will come into operation with revised methodologies and dissemination tools. Similarly, improved access to FAO information resources under the WAICENT51 framework and coherence in agricultural information will be pursued. A technical Consultation on Agricultural Information Management (COAIM) will be reinstated during the biennium. The above mentioned new programme entity under Programme 2.2.0 on Implementing Voluntary Guidelines on the Right to Adequate Food in the context of National Food Security will receive an initial provision of US$ 0.5 million made possible by shifts from other programmes.

230.     Major Programme 2.3: Fisheries will further address the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), the International Plans of Action (IPOAs) endorsed by COFI52, and other international instruments. Major areas of emphasis will include: advice on policies to pursue responsible and sustainable development in fisheries and aquaculture; the newly adopted Strategy-STF53; monitoring of the resources; support to aquaculture development; assistance to small-scale and artisanal fishing communities; participation in international reconstruction efforts in Tsunami-affected areas; and strengthening of the FAO regional fishery commissions. No major shifts are required among the component programmes.

231.     Major Programme 2.4: Forestry will also maintain the balance among its component programmes which address key environmental, economic and social dimensions of sustainable forest management. Major areas of emphasis include: FAO leadership in the international forest agenda, primarily through the Collaborative Partnership on Forests; further strengthening of international cooperation on forest fires; assistance to national capacity-building and forest programmes and projects in countries, including the National Forest Programme Facility; support to Regional Forestry Commissions and continued analysis and dissemination of information, including statistics, national and global forest resource assessments.

232.     Under Major Programme 2.5: Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts, considerable rebalancing across programmes has been effected, shifting resources from Programme 2.5.1 (US$ 7.1 million) to Programmes 2.5.2 (US$ 4.7 million) and 2.5.3 (US$ 2.4 million) with expected improved focus and coherence. The major programme will continue to ensure FAO’s leadership in the follow-up to the WSSD54, and lead organization-wide efforts in relation to SARD55, gender and HIV/AIDS. It will pursue assistance in such areas as: communication for development, education, training, land tenure, bioenergy, geo-spatial data infrastructure and multilateral environmental conventions. It will also contribute further to strengthening national capacities in research and technology and close cooperation with regional and international agricultural research systems through the Secretariats of the CGIAR56 Science Council and the GFAR57. The Regular Budget provision for the SPFS58 (2.5.6) will keep its catalytic nature in supporting a fast expanding programme.

233.     Under Chapter 3: Cooperation and Partnerships, the exceptionally high resource reductions imposed in the current budget on TCA outposted teams under Major Programme 3.1, will be partially reinstated (US$ 1.3 million). The Investment Centre (TCI) is expected to continue to work closely with its international and national partners to generate investment for agriculture and rural development (Major Programme 3.2). An increase (US$ 0.38 million) in the small Regular Programme share of Programme 3.3.3 is made to strengthen TCE's59 capacity to deal with rehabilitation programmes, while actions to adjust compensation due to the Organization for operating extra-budgetary funded emergency projects will seek to ensure adequate reimbursement of FAO’s costs. Some resources (US$ 2.5 million) are also restored to Major Programme 3.4 to partially address structural under-funding of the FAOR network, which are otherwise far short of the current cost of the network and the requirements for an effective follow-up to the Independent Evaluation of FAO’s Decentralization. The programme adjustments will inter alia allow FAO to meet in a more satisfactory manner requests for policy and strategic advice and to pursue effective field programme development. In doing so, FAO will ensure close links with national development plans, PRSPs60, and UNDAF61.

234.     Under Chapter 4, the Technical Cooperation Programme will respond to specific requests for assistance by Members with greater attention and stronger integration with other processes at the country level. The decisions of FAO governing bodies on the TCP’s future orientation, particularly its focus on the World Food Summit target and the MDGs, and actions to strengthen and streamline TCP operations, with greater delegation to country offices, will be progressively implemented.

235.     Programme budget adjustments under Chapter 5: Support Services and Chapter 6: Common Services comprise the reinstatement of some resources (US$ 0.67 million) to the Finance Division (AFF), as recommended by the Finance Committee, and provision of additional resources (US$ 1.7 million) for common services to partially correct for under-budgeting of infrastructure maintenance.

236.     Chapter 8: Capital Expenditure - it is recalled that Conference Resolution 10/2003 established a Capital Expenditure Facility, including a new Chapter 8 of the PWB for the purposes of defining and authorising capital expenditures for the corresponding biennial period. The proposals under Chapter 8 total slightly over US$ 9 million, and include the following areas: administrative information systems development, in particular the HRMS project; acquisition of server hardware and software for administrative applications; telephony equipment; and equipment for meeting rooms.

237.     Chapter 9: Security Expenditure - under the proposed Security Expenditure Facility (SEF), the new Chapter 9 would define staff and non-staff security provisions and expenditures at headquarters and in the field. The chapter comprises two major programmes: 9.1 addressing headquarters security, including related coordination with government authorities, and 9.2 covering security in field locations, including FAO’s active participation in both centrally-managed programmes of the UN unified security management system and in country-level Security Management Teams.

Import of Real Growth
238.     Under Chapter 1, additional catalytic funding of US$ 0.4 million beyond the ZRG level is provided for auto-evaluations under Programme 1.2.2.

239.     Under Major Programme 2.1, RG would allow in particular to strengthen:

  • work on the IT-PGRFA to build national and regional capacities and the implementation of the Global Plan of Action (GPA) for PGRFA;
  • catalytic central support to PAIAs;
  • water use efficiency and conservation activities (e.g. on-farm water control techniques, irrigation system modernisation and management);
  • the implementation of the IPPC, by accelerating harmonisation and standard setting programmes and for technical assistance;
  • work on critical animal health and production aspects (e.g. environmental and disease risk assessment and management, the Global Early Warning System for TADs, pro-poor livestock development policies);
  • support to policy and institutional measures for private sector marketing, agribusiness development and agro-industry innovation;
  • the practical applications generated by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division (AGE62) aimed at solving specific development problems.
240.     Under Major Programme 2.2, real growth conditions would inter alia facilitate:

  • the design of national FIVIMS63 that specifically address institutional issues;
  • the capacity of the Codex Secretariat for information dissemination, as well as capacity-building in countries related to Codex activities;
  • the expansion of the modernised FAOSTAT to countries through CountryStat;
  • the development of more efficient WAICENT access tools for Members;
  • effective methodologies for crop and food supply assessments;
  • enhanced assistance to countries to implement trade agreements.
241.     Under Major Programme 2.3, the main benefits of RG would be in terms of:

  • enhanced information on fisheries (Strategy-STF);
  • improved monitoring of marine ecosystems relevant to fisheries;
  • expanded capacity-building for small-scale fisheries development.
242.     Under Major Programme 2.4, RG would facilitate:

  • translating agreed concepts of sustainable management of forests into action and related sharing of experiences;
  • expanded advice related to the Kyoto Protocol;
  • comprehensive studies of forests and forestry for the 2030 horizon;
  • meeting the high demands for national forestry policy frameworks and institutional arrangements.
243.     Regarding Major Programme 2.5, RG would allow to:

  • reinforce normative activities and policy assistance regarding the impact of HIV/AIDS and other diseases on household and national food security;
  • enhance capacity-building for decision-makers in designing and implementing policies and best practices for SARD;
  • increase the RP provision to support the SPFS.
244.     Under Chapter 3, RG would principally allow for:

  • assistance to countries in coping with new treaties, regional integration mechanisms and globalisation challenges;
  • restoration by TCI of a satisfactory level of cooperation with partner financial institutions other than the World Bank;
  • responsiveness and capacity of service delivery by FAORs at a more sustainable level.
245.     Under Chapter 4, the RG net increase of US$ 4.1 million would clearly augment the capacity of the TCP Appropriation to meet requests from countries, including for emergencies.

246.     Under Chapter 5, real growth funding would be used to speed up AFH64 implementation of the Plan of Action for Human Resources.

247.     Chapter 8: Capital Expenditure would be increased by US$ 4.1 million to provide for HRMS and other capital projects.

Impact of Zero Nominal Growth
248.     The US$ 51.2 million or 6.4% real reduction in the present biennium entailed a more severe cut than the absorption of cost increases normally expected in a zero nominal growth scenario. This has left several areas of the Organization’s programme of work seriously under-funded. Again in 2006-07, the ZNG scenario could require abolition of some 200 positions. Even assuming that such action were feasible immediately after the required 232 post abolitions in 2004-05, additional costs for redeployment and separation of staff, tentatively estimated at up to US$ 10 million, have not been absorbed in the ZNG proposals. Furthermore, US$ 10.6 million in requirements for security needs of staff and premises are unfunded under the ZNG proposals.

249.     Under Chapter 1, despite largely fixed costs, cuts in staff and non-staff provisions would be necessary in several offices (AUD, LEG, PBE, SAD), reducing support to the governance structures and results-based management, which would put at risk the governance, oversight and accountability framework.

250.     Major Programme 2.1 would be affected in several ways, including:

  • delayed implementation of the programme of work of the CGRFA65;
  • reduced activities on land degradation and conservation, soil fertility and nutrient management;
  • elimination of support to the International Network of ex-situ collections of PGRFA;
  • although the allocation to the IPPC would still be higher than in the current biennium, if compared to the ZRG proposal there would be lower participation of developing countries in IPPC standard setting and less IPPC outreach activities (information systems and technical assistance);
  • reduced support to countries in relation to integrated pest management, pesticide management, crop improvement and biotechnology;
  • delays in the interactive Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) and in the establishment of national and regional livestock policy negotiation platforms;
  • less work on good practices for addressing food-borne diseases and new measures for zoonoses control, and also lower support to the Programme Against Animal Trypanosomiasis (PAAT);
  • work on early warning and disease control strategy design and implementation under EMPRES would become fully dependent on extra-budgetary funding;
  • elimination of technical support and information systems relating to farm power and mechanisation and of direct assistance for improving the business capacities of farmer organizations;
  • reduced policy and institutional guidance relating to agribusiness, supply chain management and commercial farming;
  • curtailment of outputs in the Joint FAO/IAEA on the use of the sterile insect technique against the Mediterranean fruit fly, molecular characterization of animal genetic resources and veterinary public health.
251.     Under Major Programme 2.2, some telling examples of negative impact are:

  • the need to adjust the structure, duration and documentation of CFS66 meetings;
  • scaling down of FIVIMS objectives (reduced statistical data collection and analysis, technical assistance to countries, work on nutritional assessment and country nutrition profiles);
  • elimination of new entities proposed in the MTP, undermining FAO’s analytical capacity in fast-changing external contexts;
  • drastic reductions in work on food composition, less nutrition publications, capacity-building workshops and training activities;
  • while relative protection has been afforded to Codex and Codex-related work, there would be a need to eliminate six sessions of FAO/WHO67 Regional Coordinating Committees;
  • cancelled work on environmental statistics, as well as income and investment statistics, delays in the development of additional indicators for measurement of food security, and fewer new CountryStat countries;
  • impaired development of the WAICENT corporate framework and the programme to bridge the rural digital divide;
  • reduced expenditures on promotion and dissemination of SOFA68 and other supportive analytical studies, providing the underpinning of Global Food and Agricultural Perspective Studies;
  • fewer projects formulated and submitted to the Common Fund for Commodities, and reduced documents and analyses for the IGGs69.
252.     As regards Major Programme 2.3, ZNG conditions would negatively affect data quality, timeliness and responses to requests for information. Work on fishing fleet statistics would be cancelled, impairing monitoring of implementation of the IPOA on fishing capacity. Other areas which would have to be reduced include: the identification and cataloguing of commercial fish species; the assessment and monitoring of world marine fishery resources; guidelines for fishery resources assessments and fisheries management; national workshops/meetings for the promotion of sustainable aquaculture; projection of world fish consumption by 2020; technical meetings and publications; support to regional fishery bodies.

253.     Concerning Major Programme 2.4, ZNG would imply much lower activities in Low Forest Cover Countries (LFCC), making them mostly subject to extra-budgetary funding. Support in combating desertification and implementing the UNCCD would have to be severely reduced. One statutory body - Silva Mediterranea - could be eliminated. ZNG would force curtailment of support to countries in the prevention and control of forest fires and to forest fire networks. It would not be possible to initiate new regional forestry outlook studies and update previous ones. Work on forest products trade and environment would be eliminated. Planned activities to address inadequacies in forestry institutions as a result of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, especially in Africa, would be halted. Support to the United Nations Forum on Forests and other dimensions of the international arrangement on forests would be curtailed.

254.     Under Major Programme 2.5, ZNG would imply reductions in:

  • support to environmental agreements and promotion of integrated environmental planning and management;
  • technology enhancement for GIS70 and remote sensing data for early warning systems;
  • technical assistance and capacity-building in biotechnology and biosafety;
  • support to networks among national research bodies and stakeholders;
  • follow-up work to the UN Roundtable on Communication for Development and the forthcoming WCCD71;
  • policy advice and technical assistance to countries in the context of the initiative on Education for Rural People (ERP);
  • policy materials and methodologies to strengthen national agricultural extension systems, including extension capacity for the prevention and mitigation of HIV/AIDS;
  • support to policies and practices for SARD, making work on the latter virtually dependent on extra-budgetary resources;
  • headquarters support to the UN System Network on Rural Development and Food Security;
  • support for up-scaling of the SPFS and to South-South Cooperation (SSC) agreements;
  • FAO’s financial support to the CGIAR Science Council and its Secretariat, and technical assistance to NARS72.
255.     Under Chapter 3, ZNG conditions would force a return to cuts affecting policy assistance posts in the regions, impacting on FAO’s capacity to assist with the implementation of the MDGs and the Organization’s capacity to assess field programme opportunities. Work with financial institutions other than the World Bank would be reduced by approximately 25% versus the current level of Investment Support Programme (ISP) work. The preparation of reports on field programme performance and the capacity to address problems related to field programme operations would be undermined. The coordination of activities related to cooperation with NGOs/CSOs73 and with the private sector, as well as the decentralized cooperation programme may also be affected.

256.     However, under Major Programme 3.4, a major effort is made to minimise the negative impact of ZNG on the network of country offices. This is achieved by modifying the preferential treatment afforded to the TCP under Chapter 4, departing from full protection in the SPWB, to sustain its percentage to the total budget at 14% under this scenario in the full PWB.

257.     Under Chapter 5, the General Affairs and Information Department would not be able to maintain the level of editorial and production quality of information materials, and would also need to reduce media services. AFF would need to eliminate posts, weakening internal financial controls, while the frequency of local audits in field offices would be reduced with self-evident impact. Among other things, AFI74 would be required to reduce significantly its information systems development services, while AFH would also reduce activities and services in key areas such as recruitment, post management and staffing services. The Management Support Service in AFD would also have to eliminate critical Help Desk functions and other support to users throughout the Organization.

258.     Under Chapter 6, the ZNG level would entail serious maintenance shortfalls on the premises which would lead to additional costs in the long term, and other reductions in common services at all locations. The inability of the Organization to meet its obligations regarding ordinary maintenance could place the Organization in the position of not being able to comply with the basic health and safety standards established by law.

259.     Under Chapter 9, security expenditures have been budgeted only at the level of the 2002-03 PWB, that is US$ 8.8 million, with US$ 10.6 million in requirements left unfunded.

Overview of Total Resource Availability

260.     The following table provides an overview of the total resource availability for both the ZRG and RG scenarios, consisting of the net Appropriations voted by Conference, other income, and voluntary contributions.

261.     The first row of the table shows the net Appropriation, with the ZRG proposal amounting to US$ 759.7 million, including the US$ 10.6 million in increased costs for security and the RG scenario which is a US$ 30.9 million programme increase over ZRG.

262.     The main change in the category Other Income credited to the General Fund arises from the inclusion of transfers from the Capital Expenditure Account, defined in this table as “Other Items”, in the ZRG and RG scenarios. As further explained under the section entitled Capital Budgeting, planned inflows relate to carry-forward from arrears.

263.     Under the category Other Income not credited to the General Fund, the main change arises from a proposed increase in the support costs rate for emergency projects, to be earned from the expected minimum level of extra-budgetary funded emergency and early rehabilitation projects in the next biennium together with an improved support cost income recovery policy for Emergency Projects 75.

Overview of Total Resource Availability (Before Cost Increases, US$ 000)
  2004-05 2006-07 ZRG 2006-07 RG
Net Appropriations voted by Conference 749,100 759,700 790,601
Voluntary Contributions under Financial Regulation 6.7: To Other Income
Other Income credited to the General Fund in the Financial Accounts
World Bank 22,264 21,600 21,600
Other Financial Institutions 7,492 7,013 8,313
Technical Support Services 5,542 6,761 6,854
Project Servicing Costs and Administrative and Operational Support Services 31,897 33,898 33,898
Government Counterpart Cash Contributions 1,820 2,484 2,534
Terminal Reports 1,244 1,118 1,118
Other Items (e.g. Reimbursements for Administrative Services to WFP, CODEX, and transfers from the Capital Expenditure Account) 3,976 8,702 8,733
Total Other Income credited to the General Fund in the Financial Accounts 74,235 81,575 83,049
Other Income not credited to the General Fund in the Financial Accounts
Co-sponsors to Science Council 3,735 4,040 4,040
Direct Operating Costs charged to Emergency Projects 12,834 16,033 16,033
Other Items (e.g. Miscellaneous Secondments) 1,107 1,379 1,379
Total Other Income not credited to the General Fund in the Financial Accounts 17,676 21,452 21,452
Total Other Income 91,911 103,027 104,501
Resources Available for the Programme of Work 841,011 862,727 895,102
Voluntary Contributions under Financial Regulation 6.7: To Trust Fund
UNDP Projects - Total 13,370 22,014 22,014
Less: Project Servicing Costs (1,200) (1,426) (1,426)
Emergency Projects - Total 214,680 241,033 241,033
Less: Direct Operating Costs charged to Emergency Projects (12,834) (16,033) (16,033)
Less: Project Servicing Costs (667) (200) (200)
Other Trust Fund Projects 316,779 456,711 456,711
Less: Project Servicing Costs (30,030) (32,274) (32,274)
Less: Technical Support Services (5,542) (6,761) (6,854)
Total Estimated Trust Fund Income 494,556 663,064 662,971
TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES AVAILABLE 1,335,567 1,525,791 1,558,073


Summary Tables

Table 1: Summary of Programme of Work and Appropriation by Chapter and Major Programme at 2004-05 Costs for ZRG (US$ 000)
Major   2004-05 Budget ZRG Programme Change 2006-07 ZRG Proposal
Programme                    
and Description Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation
Chapter   of Work Income   of Work Income   of Work Income  
11 Governing Bodies 19,598 0 19,598 (382) 159 (541) 19,215 159 19,056
12 Policy, Direction and Planning 28,236 2,100 26,136 1,260 125 1,135 29,496 2,225 27,271
13 External Coordination and Liaison 22,390 769 21,621 (6,370) 9 (6,379) 16,020 778 15,242
1 General Policy and Direction 70,224 2,869 67,355 (5,493) 293 (5,785) 64,731 3,161 61,570
21 Agricultural Production and Support Systems 102,927 2,980 99,946 1,520 (336) 1,856 104,447 2,644 101,802
22 Food and Agriculture Policy and Development 100,547 2,278 98,269 (650) 164 (814) 99,897 2,442 97,455
23 Fisheries 47,223 2,173 45,049 264 (232) 496 47,487 1,942 45,545
24 Forestry 35,374 697 34,677 269 (20) 289 35,643 677 34,966
25 Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts 56,376 5,182 51,194 342 314 27 56,718 5,496 51,222
2 Technical and Economic Programmes 342,446 13,311 329,136 1,744 (109) 1,854 344,191 13,201 330,990
31 Policy Assistance 29,653 862 28,792 2,359 414 1,945 32,013 1,276 30,737
32 Support to Investment 55,128 29,654 25,474 (189) 326 (515) 54,940 29,980 24,959
33 Field Operations 24,646 20,540 4,106 (323) 1,290 (1,614) 24,323 21,830 2,493
34 FAO Representatives 82,247 11,832 70,414 310 979 (669) 82,556 12,811 69,746
35 Cooperation with External Partners 11,800 1,955 9,845 1,752 719 1,033 13,552 2,674 10,877
39 Programme Management 2,288 147 2,141 29 12 16 2,316 159 2,157
3 Cooperation and Partnerships 205,762 64,989 140,772 3,938 3,741 197 209,700 68,730 140,970
41 Technical Cooperation Programme 98,645 0 98,645 0 0 0 98,645 0 98,645
42 TCP Unit 4,382 0 4,382 59 3 57 4,442 3 4,439
4 Technical Cooperation Programme 103,027 0 103,027 59 3 57 103,087 3 103,084
51 Information and Publications Support 18,064 0 18,064 (121) 13 (134) 17,944 13 17,931
52 Administration 48,402 7,051 41,351 (1,418) 960 (2,378) 46,983 8,011 38,972
5 Support Services 66,466 7,051 59,415 (1,539) 973 (2,512) 64,927 8,024 56,903
6 Common Services 52,486 3,692 48,794 (6,088) 1,604 (7,691) 46,398 5,295 41,103
7 Contingencies 600 0 600 0 0 0 600 0 600
8 Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 9,095 4,595 4,500 9,095 4,595 4,500
91 Headquarters Security 0 0 0 7,563 11 7,553 7,563 11 7,553
92 Field Security 0 0 0 12,435 7 12,429 12,435 7 12,429
9 Security Expenditure 0 0 0 19,999 17 19,981 19,999 17 19,981
Total 841,011 91,911 749,100 21,716 11,116 10,600 862,727 103,027 759,700


Table 2: Summary of Programme of Work and Appropriation by Chapter and Major Programme at 2004-05 Costs for RG (US$ 000)
Major   2006-07 ZRG Proposal RG Programme Change 2006-07 RG Proposal
Programme                    
and Description Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation
Chapter   of Work Income   of Work Income   of Work Income  
11 Governing Bodies 19,215 159 19,056 0 0 0 19,215 159 19,056
12 Policy, Direction and Planning 29,496 2,225 27,271 400 0 400 29,896 2,225 27,671
13 External Coordination and Liaison 16,020 778 15,242 0 0 0 16,020 778 15,242
1 General Policy and Direction 64,731 3,161 61,570 400 0 400 65,131 3,161 61,970
21 Agricultural Production and Support Systems 104,447 2,644 101,802 5,751 0 5,751 110,198 2,644 107,553
22 Food and Agriculture Policy and Development 99,897 2,442 97,455 4,827 5 4,822 104,724 2,447 102,277
23 Fisheries 47,487 1,942 45,545 2,085 25 2,060 49,572 1,967 47,605
24 Forestry 35,643 677 34,966 1,473 18 1,455 37,116 695 36,421
25 Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts 56,718 5,496 51,222 2,089 20 2,069 58,807 5,516 53,291
2 Technical and Economic Programmes 344,191 13,201 330,990 16,225 68 16,157 360,416 13,269 347,147
31 Policy Assistance 32,013 1,276 30,737 284 40 244 32,297 1,316 30,981
32 Support to Investment 54,940 29,980 24,959 2,300 1,300 1,000 57,240 31,280 25,959
33 Field Operations 24,323 21,830 2,493 0 0 0 24,323 21,830 2,493
34 FAO Representatives 82,556 12,811 69,746 3,950 50 3,900 86,506 12,861 73,646
35 Cooperation with External Partners 13,552 2,674 10,877 0 0 0 13,552 2,674 10,877
39 Programme Management 2,316 159 2,157 0 0 0 2,316 159 2,157
3 Cooperation and Partnerships 209,700 68,730 140,970 6,534 1,390 5,144 216,234 70,120 146,114
41 Technical Cooperation Programme 98,645 0 98,645 4,000 0 4,000 102,645 0 102,645
42 TCP Unit 4,442 3 4,439 100 0 100 4,542 3 4,539
4 Technical Cooperation Programme 103,087 3 103,084 4,100 0 4,100 107,187 3 107,184
51 Information and Publications Support 17,944 13 17,931 0 0 0 17,944 13 17,931
52 Administration 46,983 8,011 38,972 1,016 16 1,000 47,999 8,027 39,972
5 Support Services 64,927 8,024 56,903 1,016 16 1,000 65,943 8,040 57,903
6 Common Services 46,398 5,295 41,103 0 0 0 46,398 5,295 41,103
7 Contingencies 600 0 600 0 0 0 600 0 600
8 Capital Expenditure 9,095 4,595 4,500 4,100 0 4,100 13,195 4,595 8,600
91 Headquarters Security 7,563 11 7,553 0 0 0 7,563 11 7,553
92 Field Security 12,435 7 12,429 0 0 0 12,435 7 12,429
9 Security Expenditure 19,999 17 19,981 0 0 0 19,999 17 19,981
Total 862,727 103,027 759,700 32,375 1,474 30,901 895,102 104,501 790,601


Table 3: Summary of Programme of Work and Appropriation by Chapter and Major Programme at 2004-05 Costs for ZNG (US$ 000)
Major   2006-07 ZRG Proposal ZNG Programme Change 2006-07 ZNG Proposal
Programme                    
and Description Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation
Chapter   of Work Income   of Work Income   of Work Income  
11 Governing Bodies 19,215 159 19,056 (1,559) 0 (1,559) 17,657 159 17,498
12 Policy, Direction and Planning 29,496 2,225 27,271 (953) 230 (1,183) 28,543 2,455 26,088
13 External Coordination and Liaison 16,020 778 15,242 (270) 0 (270) 15,750 778 14,972
1 General Policy and Direction 64,731 3,161 61,570 (2,782) 230 (3,012) 61,949 3,391 58,558
21 Agricultural Production and Support Systems 104,447 2,644 101,802 (6,966) 76 (7,042) 97,480 2,720 94,760
22 Food and Agriculture Policy and Development 99,897 2,442 97,455 (7,052) 60 (7,112) 92,845 2,502 90,343
23 Fisheries 47,487 1,942 45,545 (3,133) 22 (3,155) 44,353 1,964 42,390
24 Forestry 35,643 677 34,966 (2,132) 261 (2,393) 33,510 938 32,572
25 Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts 56,718 5,496 51,222 (3,572) (50) (3,522) 53,146 5,446 47,700
2 Technical and Economic Programmes 344,191 13,201 330,990 (22,856) 369 (23,225) 321,335 13,570 307,765
31 Policy Assistance 32,013 1,276 30,737 (1,960) (124) (1,836) 30,052 1,152 28,901
32 Support to Investment 54,940 29,980 24,959 (2,767) (675) (2,092) 52,173 29,305 22,868
33 Field Operations 24,323 21,830 2,493 (702) 0 (702) 23,621 21,830 1,791
34 FAO Representatives 82,556 12,811 69,746 (704) 0 (704) 81,853 12,811 69,042
35 Cooperation with External Partners 13,552 2,674 10,877 (1,360) (36) (1,324) 12,191 2,638 9,553
39 Programme Management 2,316 159 2,157 (37) 0 (37) 2,279 159 2,120
3 Cooperation and Partnerships 209,700 68,730 140,970 (7,530) (835) (6,695) 202,169 67,895 134,274
41 Technical Cooperation Programme 98,645 0 98,645 (4,000) 0 (4,000) 94,645 0 94,645
42 TCP Unit 4,442 3 4,439 (18) 0 (18) 4,423 3 4,421
4 Technical Cooperation Programme 103,087 3 103,084 (4,018) 0 (4,018) 99,068 3 99,066
51 Information and Publications Support 17,944 13 17,931 (1,202) 0 (1,202) 16,741 13 16,728
52 Administration 46,983 8,011 38,972 (2,818) 143 (2,961) 44,165 8,154 36,011
5 Support Services 64,927 8,024 56,903 (4,020) 143 (4,163) 60,906 8,167 52,740
6 Common Services 46,398 5,295 41,103 (3,518) 0 (3,518) 42,880 5,295 37,585
7 Contingencies 600 0 600 0 0 0 600 0 600
8 Capital Expenditure 9,095 4,595 4,500 0 0 0 9,095 4,595 4,500
91 Headquarters Security 7,563 11 7,553 (634) 0 (634) 6,929 11 6,919
92 Field Security 12,435 7 12,429 (9,935) 0 (9,935) 2,501 7 2,494
9 Security Expenditure 19,999 17 19,981 (10,568) 0 (10,568) 9,430 17 9,413
Total 862,727 103,027 759,700 (55,293) (93) (55,200) 807,434 102,934 704,500


Table 4: Summary of Cost Increases on 2006-07 Programme of Work and Appropriation by Chapter and Major Programme for ZRG (US$ 000)
Major   2006-07 ZRG Proposal before Cost Increases Cost Increases 2006-07 ZRG Proposal after Cost Increases
Programme                    
and Description Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation Programme Less: Appropriation
Chapter   of Work Income   of Work Income   of Work Income  
11 Governing Bodies 19,215 159 19,056 754 0 754 19,969 159 19,810
12 Policy, Direction and Planning 29,496 2,225 27,271 1,438 0 1,438 30,934 2,225 28,709
13 External Coordination and Liaison 16,020 778 15,242 728 0 728 16,748 778 15,970
1 General Policy and Direction 64,731 3,161 61,570 2,920 0 2,920 67,651 3,161 64,489
21 Agricultural Production and Support Systems 104,447 2,644 101,802 6,862 0 6,862 111,308 2,644 108,664
22 Food and Agriculture Policy and Development 99,897 2,442 97,455 5,195 0 5,195 105,093 2,442 102,650
23 Fisheries 47,487 1,942 45,545 2,731 0 2,731 50,218 1,942 48,276
24 Forestry 35,643 677 34,966 2,168 0 2,168 37,811 677 37,134
25 Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts 56,718 5,496 51,222 3,123 0 3,123 59,841 5,496 54,345
2 Technical and Economic Programmes 344,191 13,201 330,990 20,079 0 20,079 364,270 13,201 351,069
31 Policy Assistance 32,013 1,276 30,737 3,167 0 3,167 35,180 1,276 33,904
32 Support to Investment 54,940 29,980 24,959 2,046 1,167 879 56,985 31,147 25,838
33 Field Operations 24,323 21,830 2,493 1,847 561 1,286 26,170 22,391 3,779
34 FAO Representatives 82,556 12,811 69,746 10,622 0 10,622 93,178 12,811 80,367
35 Cooperation with External Partners 13,552 2,674 10,877 686 23 663 14,238 2,697 11,541
39 Programme Management 2,316 159 2,157 106 0 106 2,422 159 2,263
3 Cooperation and Partnerships 209,700 68,730 140,970 18,473 1,751 16,722 228,173 70,481 157,692
41 Technical Cooperation Programme 98,645 0 98,645 2,006 0 2,006 100,651 0 100,651
42 TCP Unit 4,442 3 4,439 185 0 185 4,627 3 4,624
4 Technical Cooperation Programme 103,087 3 103,084 2,192 0 2,192 105,278 3 105,276
51 Information and Publications Support 17,944 13 17,931 975 0 975 18,919 13 18,906
52 Administration 46,983 8,011 38,972 1,922 0 1,922 48,905 8,011 40,894
5 Support Services 64,927 8,024 56,903 2,897 0 2,897 67,824 8,024 59,800
6 Common Services 46,398 5,295 41,103 2,253 0 2,253 48,652 5,295 43,356
7 Contingencies 600 0 600 0 0 0 600 0 600
8 Capital Expenditure 9,095 4,595 4,500 224 0 224 9,319 4,595 4,724
91 Headquarters Security 7,563 11 7,553 185 0 185 7,749 11 7,738
92 Field Security 12,435 7 12,429 255 0 255 12,691 7 12,684
9 Security Expenditure 19,999 17 19,981 441 0 441 20,439 17 20,422
Total 862,727 103,027 759,700 49,480 1,751 47,729 912,207 104,778 807,428


Table 5: Estimate of 2006-07 Programme of Work and Trust Fund Activities by Chapter and Major Programme at 2004-05 Costs for RG (US$ 000)
Major   2004-05 Budget Programme Change 2006-07 RG Proposal
Programme                        
and Description Programme Trust Total Percent Programme Trust Total Programme Trust Total Percent
Chapter   of Work Fund Activities of Total of Work Fund Activities of Work Fund Activities of Total
11 Governing Bodies 19,598 17 19,615 1.4% (382) (17) (399) 19,215 0 19,215 1.2%
12 Policy, Direction and Planning 28,236 284 28,520 2.0% 1,660 499 2,159 29,896 783 30,679 2.0%
13 External Coordination and Liaison 22,390 813 23,203 1.7% (6,370) (813) (7,183) 16,020 0 16,020 1.0%
1 General Policy and Direction 70,224 1,114 71,338 5.1% (5,093) (331) (5,424) 65,131 783 65,914 4.2%
21 Agricultural Production and Support Systems 102,927 360,898 463,825 33.3% 7,271 8,840 16,111 110,198 369,738 479,936 30.7%
22 Food and Agriculture Policy and Development 100,547 43,164 143,711 10.3% 4,177 8,996 13,173 104,724 52,160 156,884 10.0%
23 Fisheries 47,223 29,111 76,334 5.5% 2,349 18,660 21,009 49,572 47,771 97,343 6.2%
24 Forestry 35,374 46,180 81,554 5.9% 1,742 (3,322) (1,580) 37,116 42,858 79,974 5.1%
25 Contributions to Sustainable Development and Special Programme Thrusts 56,376 57,962 114,338 8.2% 2,431 59,354 61,785 58,807 117,316 176,123 11.3%
2 Technical and Economic Programmes 342,446 537,315 879,761 63.1% 17,969 92,528 110,497 360,416 629,843 990,259 63.3%
31 Policy Assistance 29,653 9,187 38,840 2.8% 2,643 5,641 8,284 32,297 14,828 47,125 3.0%
32 Support to Investment 55,128 476 55,604 4.0% 2,111 3,427 5,538 57,240 3,903 61,143 3.9%
33 Field Operations 24,646 0 24,646 1.8% (323) 0 (323) 24,323 0 24,323 1.6%
34 FAO Representatives 82,247 93 82,340 5.9% 4,260 (93) 4,167 86,506 0 86,506 5.5%
35 Cooperation with External Partners 11,800 2,831 14,631 1.0% 1,752 16,830 18,582 13,552 19,661 33,213 2.1%
39 Programme Management 2,288 67 2,355 0.2% 29 (67) (38) 2,316 0 2,316 0.1%
3 Cooperation and Partnerships 205,762 12,654 218,416 15.7% 10,472 25,738 36,210 216,234 38,392 254,626 16.3%
41 Technical Cooperation Programme 98,645 0 98,645 7.1% 4,000 0 4,000 102,645 0 102,645 6.6%
42 TCP Unit 4,382 0 4,382 0.3% 159 0 159 4,542 0 4,542 0.3%
4 Technical Cooperation Programme 103,027 0 103,027 7.4% 4,159 0 4,159 107,187 0 107,187 6.8%
51 Information and Publications Support 18,064 0 18,064 1.3% (121) 810 689 17,944 810 18,754 1.2%
52 Administration 48,402 0 48,402 3.5% (402) 0 (402) 47,999 0 47,999 3.1%
5 Support Services 66,466 0 66,466 4.8% (523) 810 287 65,943 810 66,753 4.3%
6 Common Services 52,486 1,982 54,468 3.9% (6,088) (1,982) (8,070) 46,398 0 46,398 3.0%
7 Contingencies 600 0 600 0.0% 0 0 0 600 0 600 0.0%
8 Capital Expenditure 0 0 0 0.0% 13,195 0 13,195 13,195 0 13,195 0.8%
91 Headquarters Security 0 0 0 0.0% 7,563 0 7,563 7,563 0 7,563 0.5%
92 Field Security 0 0 0 0.0% 12,435 0 12,435 12,435 0 12,435 0.8%
9 Security Expenditure 0 0 0 0.0% 19,999 0 19,999 19,999 0 19,999 1.3%
Total 841,011 553,065 1,394,076 100.0% 54,091 116,763 170,854 895,102 669,828 1,564,930 100.0%



43 International Atomic Energy Agency

44 Human Resources Management System

45 International Plant Protection Convention

46 World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

47 Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases

48 Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Disease Operations

49 Priority Areas for Inter-disciplinary Action

50 Corporate Database for Substantive Statistical Data

51 World Agricultural Information Centre

52 Committee on Fisheries

53 Strategy for Improving Information on Status and Trends of Capture Fisheries

54 World Summit on Sustainable Development

55 Sustainable agriculture and rural development

56 Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research

57 Global Forum on Agricultural Research

58 Special Programme for Food Security

59 Emergency Operations and Rehabilitation Division

60 Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers

61 United Nations Development Assistance Framework

62 Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture

63 Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information and Mapping System

64 Human Resources Management Division

65 Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

66 Committee on World Food Security

67 World Health Organization

68 The State of Food and Agriculture

69 Intergovernmental Commodity Groups

70 Geographical Information System

71 World Congress on Communication for Development

72 National Agricultural Research Systems

73 Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs); Civil Society Organizations (CSOs)

74 Information Systems and Technology Division

75 FC 110/4

Previous PageTable of ContentsNext Page