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Annex IV. PROGRAMME NARRATIVES

195. The following brief narratives focus on the major activities under the new Chapter headings at the level of component programmes. The budgetary provisions in the tables reflect in a combined manner the resources at Headquarters and in the decentralized structure at the Real Growth (RG) level and take account of the substantive areas given higher and lower emphasis, as explained in Section III. As done hitherto, the allocations of the Regional and Sub-regional Offices are assigned to the various Programmes based on the profile of the staff located there. In like vein, resources for the Country Offices, as well as Liaison Offices, have been apportioned based on their expected contributions to substantive work.

Chapter 1: Corporate Governance

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

1A

Governing bodies

9,917

0

0

9,917

1B

General direction

11,922

0

0

11,922

Total

21,838

0

0

21,838

Percentage by Source of Financing

100%%

0%

0%

100%

196. Chapter 1 would henceforth include the cost of main Governing Bodies and Regional Conferences (Programme 1A) and of General Direction, i.e. the Office of the Director General and the share of the Legal Office’s activities covering advice to Management on legal matters (Programme 1B).

Chapter 2: Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

2A

Crop production systems management

29,981

21,163

51,722

102,866

2B

Livestock production systems management

19,357

15,052

46,725

81,134

2C

Diseases and pests of animals and plants

16,834

0

174,756

191,590

2D

Nutrition and consumer protection

23,634

9,142

6,666

39,442

2E

Forestry information, statistics, economics, and policy

13,616

3,664

13,743

31,023

2F

Forestry management, conservation and rehabilitation

17,032

7,533

17,918

42,483

2G

Forest products and industry

4,450

0

0

4,450

2H

Fisheries and aquaculture information, statistics, economics, and policy

17,590

13,384

12,843

43,817

2I

Fisheries and aquaculture management and conservation

20,784

2,041

15,372

38,197

2J

Fisheries and aquaculture products and industry

10,023

1,017

3,114

14,154

2K

Sustainable natural resources management

22,812

20,655

58,281

101,748

2L

Technology, research and extension

9,978

0

0

9,978

2M

Rural infrastructure and agro-industries

17,858

910

22,257

41,025

Total

224,152

94,561

423,397

742,110

Percentage by Source of Financing

30%

13%

57%

100%

197. This Chapter would encompass the work of four departments dealing with key areas of FAO’s mandate: Agriculture, Biosecurity, Nutrition, and Consumer Protection; Forestry; Fisheries and Aquaculture; and Natural Resources, Technology and Sustainable Development. These departments will be responsible for the thirteen component programmes, labelled 2A to 2M which all contribute ultimately to sustainable food and agricultural systems.

Programme 2A - Crop production systems management

198. This programme would deal in a holistic manner with production systems for crops of major significance (cereals, oilseeds, fruits and vegetables, roots and tubers, etc.) It would therefore cover such priority areas as: plant genetic resources, seed systems, integrated plant nutrient systems, protection issues in production systems, and farm storage. It would examine socio-economic factors at the farm level, including the contribution of crop production to poverty alleviation and the requirements of smallholder crop producers, feeding into micro analysis policy work. It will include the related work of the joint FAO/IAEA division.

199. The Programme will also support the Secretariat of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (IT-PGRFA) and its programme of work as adopted by its governing body. The provision for COAG would be placed in this Programme for administrative convenience, while the Committee has a broader mandate across several Programmes.

200. Testing of integrated and sustainable production systems would be pursued primarily within the context of specific outreach programmes in countries, also making use of knowledge exchange networks within regions and sub-regions. Support relating to farm power and mechanisation or agricultural engineering would be pursued essentially within the context of knowledge exchange and outreach programmes directly in countries.

Programme 2B - Livestock production systems management

201. This Programme would deal in a comprehensive manner with animal production systems. Thus, it would cover such priority areas as: animal genetic resources and improved species, animal feed and protection aspects, on-farm facilities and conservation of products. Feeding into micro-analysis policy work, it would address socio-economic factors at farm level, the requirements of smallholder livestock producers, and the contribution of livestock to poverty alleviation.

202. After finalisation of the first report on the World’s Animal Genetic Resources, priority is to be given to the actions for improved management and conservation of domestic Animal Genetic Resources (AnGR) agreed at the First International Technical Conference on AnGR to be held in 2007. The programme would have an important component of specialized information collection.

Programme 2C - Diseases and pests of animals and plants

203. As its title indicates, this Programme would allow giving more prominence to a growing area of FAO’s intervention and well recognized comparative advantage, i.e. catalyzing international cooperation, with the identification of effective solutions, in combating diseases and pests of animals and plants, especially those of transboundary nature.

204. In a context of recurring major threats to crop and livestock production systems due to such diseases and pests, as well as eventual associated risks to human health, it is imperative to maximize FAO’s capabilities to react promptly and efficiently. The programme would thus regroup ongoing work on plant pests, particularly on the Desert Locusts and on transboundary animal diseases, including those of zoonotic nature such as avian influenza, as well as on the final eradication of rinderpest. In would operate inter alia in the context of the FAO/OIE5 Global Framework for the Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs) and through ECTAD6.

205. This programme would also pursue the special emphasis on the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), addressing in particular the harmonisation of phytosanitary measures, information exchange and technical assistance. Other major components are: the promotion of IPM; the management of pesticides, including regulatory instruments such as the Rotterdam Convention in close cooperation with UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme); and the work of the joint FAO/IAEA division related to food quality, plant and animal pests and diseases.

Programme 2D - Nutrition and consumer protection

206. This Programme would be handled alongside the other three in the new department of Agriculture, Biosecurity, Nutrition, and Consumer Protection. Therefore, this department would be able to take a more direct view of the links between crop and livestock systems and nutrition. Within the food chain “farm to table” approach, it would address all issues of quality and safety of products. This would include high priority nutrition and consumer protection work such as Codex standards and Codex-related activities and food safety aspects of biosecurity.

207. It is recalled that Codex-related work includes: the provision of scientific advice on the safety assessment of food additives, contaminants and veterinary drug residues (through, in particular, JECFA7 meetings); JMPR8 meetings; the safety assessment of microbiological hazards in food and foods derived from modern biotechnology; advice on relevant issues referred to FAO and WHO9 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission; and capacity-building on food safety/control systems in countries.

The Programme would also benefit from inputs from the joint FAO/IAEA division as relates to food quality and safety, i.e. through support for research, development of standards, training and capacity-building.

208. While it is intended to continue work on such aspects as: human nutrient requirements, food and nutrition assessments; nutrition-related policy and programme formulation; promoting healthy diets and nutrition education in schools and for the general public, it would be possible to release some resources from their consolidation to strengthen higher priority areas such as Codex.

Programme 2E - Forestry information, statistics, economics, and policy

209. As regards forest policy work, a major priority would be FAO leadership in the international forest agenda, primarily through the Collaborative Partnership on Forests and a strengthened Committee on Foresty (COFO). At country level, the programme would support national capacity-building and strategic planning, including effective forest programmes assisted by the National Forest Programme Facility. The regional forestry commissions would be further assisted so as to remain central to regional forestry processes. The economics of sustainable forest management would be addressed, specifically in the tropics, as well as the economic, financial and social implications of carbon sequestration.

210. The information part of this programme would include: analysis and dissemination of information about forests and trees outside forests, including statistics, global and regional forest sector outlook studies, and the effective use of the Internet as a dissemination tool. Other vehicles for high-quality forestry information would be the State of the World's Forests and Unasylva.

Programme 2F - Forestry management, conservation and rehabilitation

211. As sustainable forest management depends on reliable data, this programme would update the global forest resource assessment and enhance capacities for national forest assessment in countries. It would cover decision support tools for management of planted forest and tree resources and assistance to smallholders in relation to plantation forest and agroforestry systems, the involvement of local communities in forest issues and the contribution of forestry to poverty alleviation. Another major priority is to provide a forum for discussion and assist country and regional networks in preventing and combating fires and forest pests and diseases, to support national strategies and plans against forest fires, including prevention and control, and to facilitate inter-country cooperation. Developing countries would be provided with information on the potential benefits of new environmental markets, under the clean development mechanism (CDM).

Programme 2G – Forest products and industry

212. This programme would address key aspects in the production, consumption and trade of wood and non-wood products, as well as wood fuels and their economics. It would seek an enhanced contribution of forest products to poverty alleviation while ensuring environmental sustainability. This would include: regular assessments of their potential; improved production methods, and codes of harvesting. Other activities would be the Advisory Committee on Paper and Wood Products and the analysis of the global fibre supply and demand situation.

Programme 2H – Fisheries and aquaculture information, statistics, economics, and policy

213. Work regarding fishery policy under this programme would be guided by the pertinent aspects of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF). Main priorities would be the further expansion of aquaculture on a sustainable basis, ensuring a better balance between aquaculture and fisheries activities in the entire programme of the concerned department, the development of regional and national plans of action (NPOAs), and strengthened support to regional fishery bodies (RFBs) in discussing major policy issues. Among the latter would be: the socio-economic, institutional and policy aspects of overcapacity, access to resources and fishing grounds in coastal and inland waters, deep sea fisheries, the role of subsidies in small-scale and artisanal fisheries and their impact on fishing capacity and on fisheries management in general, and the contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to poverty alleviation.

214. On the information side, due prominence would be given to the newly adopted Strategy for Improving Information on Status and Trends of Capture Fisheries (Strategy-STF), while the State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA) would be continued.

Programme 2I – Fisheries and aquaculture management and conservation

215. This programme would give attention to the monitoring of key national, regional and global marine fisheries, together with the development of indicators. It would cover support to the implementation of the International Plans of Action (IPOAs) endorsed by the Committee on Fisheries (COFI). A major concern would be the elimination of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing through the implementation of better management practices, including monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS). A major global prospective analysis of future aquaculture development would be carried out, based on regional reviews and workshops. The programme would also give priority to mitigating the impact of fishing on the environment, as well as assessing its effects on small-scale and artisanal fishing communities. International cooperation on vessel monitoring systems (VMS) would be further promoted.

Programme 2J – Fisheries and aquaculture products and industry

216. This programme would cover fish utilisation and marketing in a manner consistent with national food security objectives. It would support increased contributions of small-scale fisheries to the supply of fish and fishery products to local markets and identify opportunities for access to markets from the same sector. Priority would also be given to capacity-building in relation to WTO10 agreements and their application to the fish industry, safety and quality management, with due emphasis on aquaculture.

Programme 2K – Sustainable natural resources management

217. This programme would be handled by the department of Natural Resources, Technology and Sustainable Development, allowing it to address a range of important areas hitherto dealt with in somewhat unconnected manner within the Organization: the management of land and water resources, including land tenure aspects; support to the implementation of international agreements with environmental dimensions, including in particular the implications and needed adaptation to climate change; and the use of environmental information and decision support tools.

218. The land and water cluster of this work would cover important aspects such as: greater efficiency in use of water and assistance with conservation efforts; integrated land and water policies, planning and management; land and water quality improvement and follow up to major international initiatives; and policy advice and practical methodologies for access to land and national land tenure security. Activities on water management would include transboundary water resources, where FAO could catalyze inter-country cooperation and agreements.

219. Other aspects of sustainable management of natural resources would be addressed such as: geo-spatial analysis, tools and information systems, and promoting bioenergy. The Secretariat of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture would be included under this programme. Work on climate change would be pursued in partnership with the World Meteorological Organization.

220. The consolidation of several activities linked to knowledge management and databases for land and water programmes would release some resources for other areas. Also, a wide range of activities linked to environmental and geo-information infrastructure, services, planning and management would be better focused so as to relate more closely to agriculture and climate change. The Organization’s contribution to the International Programme for Technology and Research in Irrigation and Drainage (IPTRID) would be eliminated.

Programme 2L – Technology, research and extension

221. This programme would support technology transfer, and the improvement of national agricultural research systems (NARS). Assistance to national research systems, including capacity building in biotechnology, would address issues of existing knowledge and serve national development policies and priorities. Policies, institutional arrangements and methods would be developed to reform national extension systems. FAO’s well established cooperation with the CGIAR would be included here.

Programme 2M – Rural infrastructure and agro-industries

222. This programme would aim in the first instance at assisting countries with rural infrastructure improvements in areas falling under FAO’s mandate, i.e. upstream (e.g. adequate systems for provision of inputs) and downstream at farm production level (e.g. rural roads and market infrastructure, abattoirs and cold storage facilities, etc.). It would also seek to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of agro-processing enterprises, particularly in making the transition to commercial agriculture. Capacity-building and strengthening market linkages to support farmers and agro-processing enterprises would remain top priorities. Guidance would be provided on strategies and managerial practices for improving profitability in all parts of the agrifood system and also to ensure adequate provision of support services. In relation to work on agro-industry, due attention would be paid to close cooperation with UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization).

Chapter 3: Knowledge Exchange, Policy and Advocacy

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

3A

Leveraging resources and investment

53,235

0

15,548

68,783

3B

Food and agriculture policy

35,407

15,670

14,109

65,186

3C

Trade and marketing

14,649

1,893

6,213

22,755

3D

Agriculture information and statistics

11,066

173

6,021

17,260

3E

Alliances and advocacy initiatives against hunger and poverty

22,460

6,037

8,016

36,513

3F

Gender and equity in rural societies

8,992

4,824

2,572

16,388

3G

Rural livelihoods

5,937

8,898

0

14,835

3H

Knowledge exchange and capacity building

24,880

0

1,064

25,944

3I

Information technology systems

31,223

0

0

31,223

3J

Communication and public information

18,684

0

810

19,494

Total

226,534

37,495

54,353

318,382

Percentage by Source of Financing

71%

12%

17%

100%

223. This Chapter would encompass in large part the work of the Economic and Social Development department and the departments of Knowledge Exchange, Communications and Capacity Building and of Alliances and Rural Livelihoods. All of them provide significant interfaces with FAO constituents. While of varying size in terms of resource allocations, the ten constituent programmes relate to key functions or objectives of the Organization such as: the assembly and dissemination of information, policy advisory services, resource mobilization, capacity building and advocacy.

Programme 3A – Leveraging resources and investment

224. This programme would group on the one hand activities of resource mobilization and on the other investment generation, as carried out by FAO’s Investment Centre division in cooperation with International and other Financial Institutions. Both areas share the broad aim of mobilizing resources not only for execution by FAO itself but to meet requirements of Members in areas of FAO’s mandate. Both need to be attuned to fast changing contexts at country level regarding the evolution of external assistance.

225. In the first area, the programme would take account of new trends such as: the decentralization of decision-making authority by several important donors; the importance given by the international community to achieving the MDGs11 and PRSPs12; new funding modalities; and the opportunities stemming from such events as the Monterrey Conference and the commitments made at the G8 Summit in Gleneagles and by the European Union.

226. Besides international and regional financial institutions, closer cooperation would be sought with the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) and its Development Assistance Committee (DAC), the European Union and bilateral financing arrangements (Millenium Challenge Account, etc.).

227. In the second area, FAO’s Investment Centre would continue to build on the strong links established with some 20 major financing and related institutions, also bearing in mind the required strengthening of governments’ capacity to formulate agriculture and rural development projects and programmes. In line with expected strong increase in demand from the World Bank, particularly for Africa, a sizeable part of the budgetary provision would be committed to the cost-sharing agreement between FAO and this key partner.

Programme 3B – Food and agriculture policy

228. This Programme would bring together, and thus contribute to ensuring more direct interactions between, the well established range of policy advisory services provided by FAO primarily through its decentralized groups, and general work of policy analysis and the dissemination of the results of such policy work as carried out at Headquarters through various activities. It is recalled that policy advisory services to Members would include a component of legal advice. The Programme would in particular seek to establish networks among centres of excellence in countries to foster exchanges of experience in top level policy work on agriculture (also from historical and geographical perspectives), on the interface between the agricultural sector, including agro-industries, with secondary and tertiary sectors and its role in stimulating economic growth.

229. Given the growing importance of regional integration agreements and treaties, policy assistance would be further extended to regional economic integration organizations to secure convergence and harmonisation of development policies, strategies and priorities in areas of FAO’s mandate. Capacity building in this area will be of special importance.

230. Therefore, alongside direct services to Members, the Programme would include work aimed at enhanced understanding of the impact of agricultural, rural development and environmental policies on poverty and food security and other policy research, including that flowing into Global Perspective Studies. As it serves policy targeting through more reliable information on food security and vulnerability in countries, FIVIMS would be an important tool placed in this programme.

231. In view of their close dependency on the above continuum of policy work, the preparation of the State of Food and Agriculture (SOFA), the servicing of the Committee on World Food Security and monitoring of the implementation of World Food Summit commitments would also be placed under this programme.

232. The grouping of various aspects of policy related work should lead to greater synergies and therefore it would be possible to release resources to contribute to wider geographic coverage in the decentralized structure.

Programme 3C – Trade and marketing

233. This programme would cover commodity policy and development strategies, including diversification and value addition in domestic and export markets, and linkages to national and household food security. With respect to international agricultural trade policy, it would include analyses, technical assistance to countries and capacity-building to support effective participation in international trade negotiations and implementation of multilateral trade agreements. Work on commodity outlooks and market assessment would complete the picture. Close cooperation with the WTO (World Trade Organization) and UNCTAD (UN Conference on Trade and Development) would be prominent features.

Programme 3D – Agriculture information and statistics

234. This programme would include FAO’s work on statistics, including assistance to national systems, with considerable benefits expected in the next biennium from the modernised FAOSTAT and CountryStat (the country version of FAOSTAT).

Programme 3E – Alliances and advocacy initiatives against hunger and poverty

235. As its title indicates, this programme would provide a more organic home for, and thus contribute to better synergies among essential advocacy activities of the Organization including: the International Alliance Against Hunger (IAAH) and support to national alliances in conformity with the decisions of the World Food Summit five years later, World Food Day (WFD) observances and the TeleFood campaign, and the use of FAO Ambassadors.

236. The programme would also promote corporate frameworks for effective interaction with a variety of different partners, especially civil society, parliaments, artists, sports celebrities and renowned intellectuals, etc. It would support the implementation of the partnership programmes to benefit Members in terms of greater leverage for the limited resources at FAO’s disposal.

237. Thus, the IAAH would further interface with the implementation process for the MDGs and other international efforts in calling attention to policy reforms and programme initiatives to reduce hunger. Work on Implementing Voluntary Guidelines on the Right to Adequate Food in the context of National Food Security would be placed under this programme aiming at training and capacity-building, and the preparation and dissemination of information and communication materials.

Programme 3F – Gender and equity in rural societies

238. This programme would support the Organization-wide priority given to the gender dimension of development and address the consequences of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on food and agriculture. Work on child malnutrition, on school gardens, and on addressing the needs of indigenous rural peoples will call for effective partnerships with UNICEF and the World Food Programme, while attention to the broader gender dimension would require close cooperation with the UNFPA (United Nations Fund for Population Activities).

Programme 3G – Rural livelihoods

239. This Programme would provide in the first instance support to national activities aimed at enhancing the ability of people at grass roots level to take charge of their own lives and participate effectively in decision-making processes affecting their future. It would pay special attention to the potential of key groups such as farmers’ organizations, community associations, women’s groups, indigenous people’s movements, and rural workers’ unions. The programme would address in a complementary manner several important dimensions of sustainable livelihoods such as: communication for development and education for rural people, enhanced rural employment opportunities and people’s participation, more responsive service systems, and reduction in rural people’s vulnerability to natural, economic and political shocks. Bringing together different facets of livelihoods issues should result in improved coherence. The UN System Network on Rural Development and Food Security would support country level work in the design and dissemination of rural development and livelihoods policies and practices.

240. Work on rural education and employment would involve close interactions with UNESCO (United Nations Education, Science and Culture Organization) and ILO (International Labour Organization).

Programme 3H – Knowledge exchange and capacity building

241. Capacity building is intrinsic to FAO’s mandate of assistance to Members and information dissemination. This requires better planning, programming and monitoring arrangements as well as efficient coordinating and facilitating functions for the specialized capacity building activities in relevant departments. The programme would identify training opportunities, promote and catalyse use of fellowships with attention to selection of trainees to match offers, and mobilize support to fill gaps. The programme would be central to supporting institution building.

242. As a major instrument in fostering knowledge exchange and capacity building in the handling of information, work on WAICENT and associated tools would be particularly prominent under this programme, including extension of the WAICENT corporate model components to national levels. The programme would also include FAO’s range of library services and the Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS).

243. Another major task for this programme, as well as the following programme 3I, would be to spearhead the progressive implementation of interactive systems to support “Ask FAO” services, providing more direct and timely access by all potentially interested persons or institutions to the wealth of information accumulated by the Organization and in Member Nations, in particular the dissemination of best practices. This would also feed into the outreach programmes of the Organization.

Programme 3I – Information technology systems

244. This programme would deal with the information technology (IT) side of knowledge generation and exchange, covering IT systems concepts, standards, planning, development and application throughout the Organization, as well as the underpinning computer and telecommunications infrastructure. It would, however, exclude IT implementation support as relates to financial and administrative activities placed in Chapter 5. While most of the costs of IT systems were hitherto distributed to various programmes making use of them and were not readily identifiable, they would henceforth be shown in a full manner under this programme. As required, cooperation would be ensured with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Programme 3J – Communication and public information

245. This programme would primarily cover activities related to external communication and also the management of publishing activities in the Organization. It would seek to ensure a continuous flow of communication to FAO’s Members as well as proactive communications with a broad range of audiences, including close interaction with the media and use of field visits to ensure better appreciation of FAO’s work. It would also support the production of multilingual information products and services. The possibility of raising income from donations and publicity through the FAO Web site would also be examined.

Chapter 4: Decentralization, UN Cooperation and Programme Delivery

<

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

4A

UN cooperation, integration and monitoring

18,510

0

0

18,510

4B

Coordination of decentralized services

19,085

0

0

19,085

4C

Food security, poverty reduction and other development cooperation programmes

82,644

0

59,239

141,883

4D

Emergency and post crisis management

18,261

0

0

18,261

4E

Technical Cooperation Programme

107,184

0

0

107,184

Total

245,685

0

59,239

304,924

Percentage by Source of Financing

81%

0%

19%

100%

246. This Chapter would include the work of the department of Coordination and Decentralization (except for its division dealing with Conference and Council affairs, the resources of which are more logically placed under Chapters 1 and 5) and that of Outreach Programmes. The five component programmes would address key facets of FAO’s “field work”, and essential coordination needs both within the Organization and in connection with the UN system at large.

247. The most important challenge would be to bring about greater coherence in the Organization’s activities within the same country, towards more integrated programmes, fully aligned to government priorities. This would be served by a strategic planning process involving the government, the UN system and donors which would identify where FAO, in line with its mandate and comparative advantage, could best contribute to the achievement of the government’s development goals, as expressed in its Poverty Reduction Strategies and for the achievement of the MDGs. This new approach would also apply to programme development work with Regional and Sub-Regional Organizations. It would need to be supported by improved country and sub-regional intelligence. In essence, FAO’s technical cooperation with Members should contribute to the emergence of strong nationally (and regionally) led development programmes rather than necessarily expand the scale of its own operations.

Programme 4A – UN Cooperation, integration and monitoring

248. As clearly conveyed by its title, this programme would guide FAO’s cooperation with UN system partners, including through the Liaison Offices with the United Nations in New York and Geneva. It would act as focal point for relations at policy level with the UN Secretariat, the UNGA and ECOSOC, the Joint Inspection Unit and the International Civil Service Commission, the Chief Executives Board (CEB) and all organizations within the system, with the exception of the World Bank and IMF. It would assist in the formulation and implementation of policies of the Organization for promoting cooperation, partnerships and joint divisions with these organizations, and for ensuring the overall monitoring of FAO’s contribution to the Millennium Development Goals and to UN reform processes. As this involves similar work, cooperation with other inter-governmental Organizations would also be included.

Programme 4B – Coordination of decentralized services

249. This programme would support FAO’s decentralization policy by ensuring that headquarters and the various layers of the decentralized structure work in truly complementary fashion in the provision of services to Members. With expanding geographical coverage of member countries and a greater transfer of responsibilities to the regional, subregional and country levels, a robust headquarters oversight and back-up capacity is required to facilitate and support the decentralized offices and allow them to realize their full potential in providing support to countries. The Programme would cover: advice and reporting to Senior Management and governing bodies on decentralized offices matters; the oversight and management support to the decentralized offices network; and the coordination of security arrangements for FAO personnel in the field, including UN system wide cooperation. It would provide regularly updated guidance to decentralized offices, particularly on their involvement in, and contribution to, the UN reforms and development efforts.

Programme 4C – Food security, poverty reduction and other development cooperation programmes

250. This Programme would include in the first instance: country intelligence, analysis and the preparation of briefs; the design, documenting and updating of procedures (including medium term priority frameworks); improved monitoring and reporting tools, building on FPMIS (Field Programme Management Information System); and systematic inspection of outreach activities. It would also serve as a clearing house for project and programme proposals.

251. The programme would support the formulation and, when requested, implementation of National and Regional Food Security and Poverty Reduction Programmes which would serve as the “umbrella” for many of FAO’s country and sub-regional activities. It would work closely with field offices and with units responsible for mobilizing resources and would orchestrate the engagement of relevant expertise from across the Organization. It would also host the Regular Budget provision to support National Programmes for Food Security (NPFS) with progressive scaling up of the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS). Specific dimensions of outreach programmes would need to be addressed together with the most concerned UN system partners, for instance with UN-Habitat on urban and peri-urban agriculture.

Programme 4D – Emergency and post crisis management

252. This programme would need to operate in a context where the fastest growing element of outreach programmes relates to emergency and rehabilitation projects (34% of total delivery in 2004). It would seek to improve furher the linkages between FAO’s support for emergencies and for longer term development, whereby emergency interventions would be designed and implemented not only to provide immediate relief but also to lay the foundation for growth and resilience to future threats. Therefore, the overall strategy would be to save, restore and enhance agriculture and fisheries based livelihoods to reduce vulnerability, increase self-reliance, and enable an exit from food aid.

Programme 4E – Technical Cooperation Programme

253. The Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) would constitute the fifth major element under this Chapter. It is recalled that the TCP has been under review through a process led by FAO’s Programme Committee and subject to the endorsement of related proposals by the Committee and the Council, this process should lead to a much strengthened TCP in the next and future biennia.

Chapter 5: Management and Supervision Services

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

5A

Oversight

10,037

0

0

10,037

5B

Programme and budget services

11,867

0

783

12,650

5C

Financial services

20,708

0

0

20,708

5D

Human resources management and staff welfare

17,519

0

0

17,519

5E

Procurement

7,290

0

0

7,290

5F

Management of premises

34,460

0

0

34,460

5G

Meetings and language services and protocol

6,500

0

0

6,500

5H

Shared services

34,718

0

0

34,718

Total

143,100

0

783

143,883

Percentage by Source of Financing

99%

0%

1%

100%

Programme 5A - Oversight

254. This Programme would display in a more transparent manner expenditures related to the key function of oversight, i.e.: the work carried out both by the External Auditor and the Inspector General in all locations, the provision for local audits in decentralized offices, centrally funded Evaluation activities including support to auto-evaluations.

Programme 5B – Programme and budget services

255. This Programme would cover the work of the Office of Programme, Budget and Evaluation (PBE) except as relates to evaluation which is included in the preceding programme. The provision includes system support to general programming, budgeting and monitoring activities in the Organization and a centrally managed catalytic fund to assist with implementation of PAIAs (i.e. pending full mainstreaming of PAIA leadership responsibilities into the new structure, as indicated).

Programme 5C – Financial services

256. This Programme would cover the management of the Organization’s financial resources, maintaining financial systems, and reporting accurate and timely financial results to all levels within the Organization and to the Governing Bodies. It would also cover the preparation of the financial statements of the Organization for audit by the External Auditor and the Organization’s worldwide investment, cash and currency management needs.

Programme 5D – Human resources management and staff welfare

257. This Programme would include the Division of Human Resources Management and the Medical Service of the Department of Human, Financial and Physical Resources. It would ensure that the Organization possesses the right set of competencies and human resources to achieve its goals. It would also give new impetus to human resources planning and development, as well as promoting a culture of continuous learning. The implementation of the Human Resources Management System (HRMS), based on Oracle applications, underpins the effective delivery of this programme.

Programme 5E – Procurement

258. This Programme would cover central support to procurement activities throughout the Organization, which have expanded considerably due to emergency-related work. It will also assist with procurement related institutional building and training in concerned countries, in the context of important unilaterally-funded programmes and projects.

Programme 5F – Management of premises

259. This Programme would cover various aspects of the management of premises, including utilities and maintenance of buildings, but excluding security which is handled under Chapter 9. For infrastructure improvement at Headquarters, continued reliance would be placed on the support of the Italian Government, as well as governmental and corporate donors. This Programme would also include essential services related to documents, central records and internal communications.

Programme 5G – Meetings and language services and protocol

260. This Programme would ensure programming of language services and financial management and monitoring of interpretation, translation and printing services. It would also cover liaison and protocol work at headquarters, including liaison with Permanent Representatives and Missions accredited to FAO, and the issuance of travel documents, visas and identity cards.

Programme 5H – Shared services

261. This programme would host the proposed Shared Services Centre (SSC) which would ultimately contribute to efficiency gains in handling administrative tasks by reducing fragmentation and duplication. In the current programme structure, a precedent exists with the centralized Management Support Service (MSS), the cost of which is distributed across a number of programmes. The SSC would consolidate the present MSS, a similar unit in OCD and the MSU in each of the Regional Offices, adjusting the required Headquarters staff in line with shared cost principles and the use of advanced software solutions.

Chapter 6: Contingencies

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

6A

Contingencies

600

0

0

600

Total

600

0

0

600

Percentage by Source of Financing

100%

0%

0%

100%

262. The provision for contingencies remains unchanged since the PWB 1980-81.

Chapter 8: Capital Expenditure

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

8A

Capital Expenditure

13,195

0

0

13,195

Total

13,195

0

0

13,195

Percentage by Source of Financing

100%

0%

0%

100%

263. It is recalled that Conference Resolution 10/2003 established a Capital Expenditure Facility to integrate capital expenditure planning into FAO’s budgeting and financial framework. Chapter 8 of the PWB serves to define and authorise capital expenditures for the biennial period covered by the Programme of Work. The proposals for Capital Expenditure remain unchanged from those presented in the main document.13

Chapter 9: Security Expenditure

(All amounts in US$ 000)

 

Regular Budget

Trust Fund

All Financing

Programme

RG 2006-07 Programme of Work

Direct Support to Programme of Work

Other Voluntary Contributions

 

9A

Headquarters security

7,563

0

0

7,563

9B

Field security

12,435

0

0

12,435

Total

19,998

0

0

19,998

Percentage by Source of Financing

100%

0%

0%

100%

264. This Chapter relates to the proposed Security Expenditure Facility (SEF) to provide comprehensive coverage of staff and non-staff costs directly related to security at FAO. The security budget in the next biennium is estimated at close to US$ 20 million. The Chapter comprises two programmes dealing respectively with Headquarters and the decentralized structure, as elaborated in the main document.14 The provision may have to be revised based on effective requirements, once the revamped decentralized structure is fully in place.


5  World Organisation for Animal Health

6  Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Disease Operations

7  Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives

8 Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues

9  World Health Organization

10  World Trade Organization

11  Millennium Development Goals

12  Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers

13 C 2005/3 paragraphs 499-512

14 C 2005/3 paragraphs 514-519

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