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Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A1 Alternative Crops and Cultivars for New Opportunities Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: small family farms cannot increase income based on the production of staple food crops alone. They need higher-value products such as fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices, flavourings, natural colorants, medicinal plants and neutraceuticals. However, introducing new crops is unlikely to foster sustainable development unless tested technological and commercial packages are introduced at the same time.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: diversification in alternative crops and locally adapted varieties will help farming households maintain a comparative advantage and reduce risks associated with environmental and market factors, thus improving food security and their income generation capacity.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: small-scale farmers and processors (including women and young farmers) and whole farming communities, as well as private sector entrepreneurs and commercial growers.

Objective

  • Broadening of the extension services syllabus and expertise in alternative food and cash crops and cultivars, and increased areas planted with such crops (crop diversification) in targeted eco-zones.

Indicators

  • Increase in planted area/greenhouse construction for locally adapted or introduced crops/cultivars.
  • Increase in use of perennial and/or carbon-neutral or positive stabilising species.
  • Evidence of interest in high-value crops, promoted by this entity, shown by governments, public institutions, donors and private enterprises.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Although "Alternative Crops" remains a central thematic of Chapter 2, this is the last biennium where this work has its own separate programme entity (PE); it will be aggregated with other thematics designed to assist sustainable income generation by crop intensification and diversification under PE-2AA06. Key crop networks were supported (e.g. date palm, Inter-American Citrus Network, Latin American Tropical Fruits Network, CactusNet). Newsletters were supported on sesame and safflower, and production guidelines were issued for sweet sorghum for bioenergy, for cold-tolerance oil palm, for Artemesia (malaria medicinal) and others. FAO and WHO developed a Good Agriculture and Collection Practices Guideline for medicinal plants, published by WHO. FAO and WHO also launched a joint initiative to promote fruit and vegetable production for health and income, which was supported in the PE's expanding partnerships. Support and guidance were given to the Global Facility on Underutilized Crops in cooperation with IPGRI, IFAD and GFAR. Capacity-building workshops were promoted on diverse horticulture crops and production systems, and strategic technical assistance was provided to many countries. Support was given on industrial and horticulture crops, especially in Asia and the Near East and North Africa region.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Collection and integration of fragmented knowledge on lesser-known crops with localised and/or international potential.
  401 Newsletters to fill knowledge gaps in underutilized crops Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  402 Ecocrop (crop/environment data base) updated with more species and searchable fields and CD-ROMs produced Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
  403 Meeting reports on underutilized species such as the GFAR Global Facilitation Unit for underutilized crops Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  404 Published descriptions of good practices for marketing such as organic production of medicinal plants Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP Completed
  405 Hortivar system expanded to cover more species, cultivars and IPP information Information (products, systems, databases) AGP RAP RLC Completed
  406 Capacity building and guidelines on efficient propagation systems for healthy planting material of improved horticultural cultivars Training (including training courses and materials) AGP RAP Completed
002   Assessment and promotion of high-value crops for distinct agro-ecological environments.
  401 Continued technology expansion of cold-tolerant oil palm in Africa and new drought and saline-tolerant sweet sorghum globally Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAP SAFR Completed
  402 Electronic dissemination of information on new cultivars Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  403 Advisory services and capacity building to promote various horticultural and fruit crops with comparative advantage in accordance with the agro-ecological environment and socio-economic context, including formulation of national sector development plans Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE Completed
004   Technology transfer for integrated greenhouse crop production and protection management.
  401 Technical guidelines on norms and standards for cost effective greenhouse technology in accordance with the crop requirements and environmental conditions Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RNE Completed
  402 Exchange of information and capacity building on Integrated Production and Protection (IPP) management aiming at high quality and safe horticulture produce in line with international regulations Training (including training courses and materials) AGP RNE Completed
  403 Assessment of crop diversification options to establish comparative advantages for new market opportunities Studies and analyses AGP RAP Completed
  407 HORTIVAR enriched with information on the performance of horticulture cultivars Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A3 Strategies and Technologies for Sustainable Crop and Grassland Production Systems Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: crop productivity increase has often been detrimental to natural resources, giving rise to widespread concerns over the sustainability of agricultural intensification (e.g. from the biological, ecological, economic and social perspectives). Another approach is embodied by the Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development (SARD). Emerging export markets for organically cultivated commodities offer prospects for developing country farmers and pastoralists, and represent a niche area to which science can contribute much in terms of improved crops' and pastures' systems. Technologies are often available in a particular country or international research centre, but have not been transferred to benefit production at farm level or to other countries.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: this technical project focuses on inter-disciplinary efforts towards the development and effective implementation of strategies and integrated technologies capable of reducing food insecurity and improving rural livelihoods, while ensuring that natural resources are not degraded.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: smallholders, home garden owners, urban or peri-urban agricultural producers and pastoral communities will benefit from guidance regarding sustainable and profitable methods of crop production and their implementation. Consumers and the public at large should ultimately be assured of better quality and safer food, produced in ways which do not harm the environment.

Objective

  • Strategies adopted, and technologies tested and disseminated for sustainable crops and grassland production and protection systems.

Indicators

  • Evidence of successful application to field level of various guidelines and technologies.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • This programme entity is an aggregation of major activities to promote sustainable intensification and diversification of cropping systems as well as some limited work on extensive systems (range management in the Near East and North Africa). Managed pastures are fully incorporated. Pilot-level farmer-participatory testing of integrated crop/pasture/livestock systems in the cotton-production ecology in southwestern Burkina Faso, linked to SPFS, was emphasized and will be scaled up in farmer field schools. The Global Cassava Development Strategy produced four technical publications. Eleven publications were prepared on different subjects related to grassland management and intensification of fodder production and development perspectives of grassland in the world: i) in different ecologies (temperate, tropical, dryland including the Near East, mountain); ii) in different languages (Arabic, English, French, Spanish) iii) for different targets (policy-makers, scientists, children, public at large). CD-ROMs related to grassland species and country profiles, drought-resisting strategies and mechanisms of grassland species were prepared and widely distributed. Videos, pamphlets, international papers, other publications and pilot activities related to biodiversity, fodder production, fodder intensification and conservation on a global scale, for mountain and dryland ecosystems of Asia, the Lake Chad basin, the Near East and Africa were prepared/carried out. Plenary papers were presented at eight international conferences (at UNEP, IUCN, IGC, Asian and Latin American universities and research centres, ALAWUC, CAMRE). Technical assistance on implementation of good agricultural practices and organic agriculture was emphasized in the Near East, Asia and Latin America. In the Latin American and the Caribbean region, videos, pamphlets, international papers, other publications and pilot activities related to identification and demonstration of adapted crops and production technologies including microgarden systems adapted to urban and peri-urban areas were carried out by the Agriculture Group of the Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean (RLCA)/AGPC in Argentina, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and Chile. Assistance on urban and peri-urban agriculture was provided to many countries; Africa was emphasized, and South-South collaboration was promoted. Two training courses on resources allocation for plant-breeding activities were carried out by FAO in collaboration with the Istituto Agronomico per L'Oltremare (Florence) for ten African countries. Two courses on plant-breeding methods and the application of biotechnology tools were carried out in Africa, one for French- and the other for Portuguese-speaking countries.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Improved management techniques in smallholder cropping systems.
  401 Guidelines for curriculum development on home gardens in agricultural higher education Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR Cancelled
  402 Support to networking and capacity-building on homestead horticulture for improved livelihoods Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP RNE SAFR Completed
  403 School garden programme technical support service/kit Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR Completed
002   Introduction of improved cropping systems for increased and sustainable crop productivity.
  401 Support to the Tropical Asian Maize Network (TAMNET) and to rice-wheat systems in South Asia Training (including training courses and materials) AGP RAP Cancelled
  402 Capacity building on breeding programmes in difficult environments and on participatory plant breeding, to complement and strengthen national programmes Training (including training courses and materials) AGP RLC SAFR Completed
  403 Publications on sustainable cereal production and mixed perennial/annual/animal systems Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
  404 Models for improvement of farmers' knowledge on integrated crop management through Field Schools and on-farm demonstrations linked to the SPFS and related PAIAs Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RNE SAFR Modified
  406 Participatory capacity-building on rational fruit crop management practices Training (including training courses and materials) AGP Completed
003   Strategies and technologies for natural, low-input grassland systems and maintenance and use of biodiversity.
  401 Case studies and publications on different grassland ecosystems and biodiversity dynamics Studies and analyses AGP RNE Completed
  402 Guidelines on management of grasslands in degraded environments, including development of national and regional policies and projects Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RNE SAFR Completed
  403 Promotion and networking on traditional systems of maintenance and use of local grassland genetic resources Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RNE Completed
004   Technologies and improved knowledge base for intensive forage production and conservation.
  401 Networking on integrated fodder/crop systems Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RLC RNE SAFR Completed
  402 Knowledge base on forage conservation, and dissemination of information in various formats Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
  403 Case studies and publications on pasture/crop/livestock systems and grassland issues Studies and analyses AGP RAF RLC RNE SAFR Completed
  404 Support to sustainable, including low energy management, of pastures and fodder crops in high potential areas, including irrigated rice Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR Completed
  405 Improved statistical information on world/country grassland and fodder crop resources Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Modified
005   Implementation of the "Global Cassava Development Strategy".
  401 Knowledge base on the integrated development and use of cassava with publications on cassava issues as Secretariat to Global Cassava Strategy Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
  402 Advisory services for the formulation of national, sub-regional and regional projects in support of cassava development strategy, including food supply to urban areas Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF SAFR Completed
  403 Cooperation with IITA for assistance to member countries in the identification and rapid propagation of pest and disease resistant planting material of cassava Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
009   Development of Good Agricultural Practice Protocols, including organic agriculture, in diverse production systems.
  401 Guidelines and professional capacity building for the implementation of Integrated Production and Protection (IPP) management of horticulture crops in open field and under protected cultivation Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR Completed
  402 Capacity building workshops and projects on sound cultivation practices for useful saprophytic mushroom species Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP Completed
  403 Studies, guidelines and fact sheets on sustainability of organic agriculture/horticulture management systems Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAP RLC Postponed
  404 Series of stakeholder consultations to develop G.A.P. protocols for key horticultural commodities Studies and analyses AGP Completed
010   Sustainable intensification practices for urban and peri-urban agricultural production systems.
  401 Integration of UPA in agriculture development plans as a component of the overall strategy for improved food and nutrition security, and related capacity building Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
  402 Identification and demonstration of adapted crops and production technologies including micro garden systems adapted to urban and peri-urban environments Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RAP RLC Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A4 EMPRES - Plant Pests Component Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: transboundary plant pests, and in particular desert locusts, are a continuing threat to the livelihoods of rural populations and to the overall food security of affected countries. Prevention and control programmes must be effective, while respecting human health and the environment.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: strengthened early warning and early reaction systems to desert locust outbreaks contribute to cost-effective and environmentally-friendly control of locust populations in affected countries.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farmers and pastoral communities will benefit from protection of crops and pastures. The public at large will gain from the reduction and substitution of chemical pesticides with bio-pesticides.

Objective

  • To minimise the risk of transboundary plant pest emergencies, initially focusing on desert locusts, through support of early warning systems, early reaction and research capabilities.

Indicators

  • Examples of timely control of critical desert locust situations, due to improved early warning capacity.
  • Increase in use of bio-pesticides in locust-affected countries.
  • Reduced use of chemical pesticides for effective control of locust outbreaks.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Following the desert locust outbreak in West Africa in late 2003, which led to a major upsurge by the following spring in Northwest Africa, the Emergency Centre for Locust Operations (ECLO) was re-established to coordinate locust-control campaigns and work in the whole area, including mobilization of resources from donors and coordination and supervision of field activities. Great attention was given to ensure human health safety and environmental preservation. Throughout these operations, national capacity-building was prioritized, especially in the implementation of locust survey and control operations and in risk reduction linked to effective application of pesticides. The EMPRES - Desert Locust Component, well established in the Central Region (around the Red Sea), was able to contribute to the efforts made to contain an outbreak that developed in the Sudan in 2003 and again when the upsurge spread to the Central Region in November 2004. An evaluation of the programme in 2005 concluded that EMPRES/CR (Central Region) had provided a solid foundation for future coordinated preventive desert-locust control efforts. Although EMPRES pilot activities were initiated in the Western Region, donor support to the programme did not materialize sufficiently to allow the programme to start operationally in the nine countries in West and Northwest Africa before the upsurge.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Coordination of EMPRES activities.
  401 Assistance to the EMPRES (Desert Locust) Programmes in the Central and Western Regions, and the initiation of a programme in the Eastern Region, including coordination meetings with relevant stakeholders and annual planning documents, and training events Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RNE Completed
002   Improved locust survey and early warning systems.
  401 Support to effective early warning systems in desert locust affected countries, including new and improved technologies involving remote sensing, electronic data transmission, global positioning systems, and good survey practices Coordination and information exchange AGP RNE Completed
003   Support to early locust control capacity building.
  401 Support to national locust control capacities through improved contingency planning, training, provision of equipment and operating resources and the field testing of new, more environmentally friendly control techniques, especially biopesticides Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RNE Completed
004   Desert locust management methods and strategies.
  401 Improved desert locust emergency prevention strategies and support to inter-country cooperation and technical assistance on early warning and control of other locust species and other transboundary pests Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAP RLC RNE SAPA SNEA Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A5 "Mainstreaming IPM" by Enhancing Essential Ecological Processes Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: countries face conflicting pressures to reduce both risks to consumers from pesticide residues in food as well as international phytosanitary risks. Chemically-based pest management leads to reduced agro-biodiversity and disrupted ecological functions and services, and ultimately leads to pest outbreaks and production instability. Health hazards associated with acute pesticide exposure are compounded by poor nutrition and infectious diseases, hence contributing to household food insecurity and poverty.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: with Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as the preferred pest management strategy, communities should be enabled with adequate donor support to set up and sustain farmers field schools (FFS) that teach IPM. Knowledge acquired in FFS will make it possible to restrict and eliminate toxic pesticides, replacing them with recommended production techniques that enhance ecosystem services such as pest regulation by natural predators.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: rural communities should benefit from more stable income due to fewer pest outbreaks, safer food, and lower risks from exposure to pesticides. Consumers (mostly urban) should experience lower health risks from pesticide residues in food and other agricultural products. The environment will be better preserved, with less disruption of ecosystem functions embodied in biodiversity.

Objective

  • IPM becomes, before 2012, the preferred pest management strategy for the majority of member countries, with the farmers field schools becoming the leading model for community-based participatory technology development.

Indicators

  • Financial size and number of benefiting farmers of national IPM programmes.
  • Examples of approved national pesticide reduction strategies, national policy reforms in support of, or explicitly mentioning IPM.
  • Improvements in the quality of IPM deliverables at community level.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • FAO supported regional integrated pest management (IPM) programmes in Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, the Near East and West Africa, which together encompassed national IPM programmes of 25 countries. In addition, a number of individual countries were supported in developing IPM programmes. National IPM programmes contributed to IPM field capacity-building, awareness-raising and policy development. Implementation of IPM activities remained largely dependent on extrabudgetary resources. Both regular programme and extrabudgetary resources for core IPM activities, including the Global IPM Facility, diminished considerably during the period 2004-2005. During the biennium, a pre-entry weed risk assessment procedure was prepared and published in three official languages of the organization (English, French, Spanish). A seminar at FAO headquarters regarding the problem of invasive weeds was organized and included several outstanding specialists, and subregional training for the Caribbean, Central America and Colombia on the above procedure was conducted. For the case of herbicide resistance, a database on herbicide-resistant species in rice was elaborated by a group of experts collaborating with FAO. To this end, two technical meetings were conducted, and two seminars, one in Mexico and the other in Uruguay, were carried out during 2004 and 2005, respectively.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Integrated pest management policies.
  401 Case studies of IPM implementation that reduces risks to farmers and consumers, strengthens local and national policy making, including export opportunities under IPPC, WTO and interregional trade arrangements Studies and analyses AGP Completed
  402 Technical guidelines and training of national personnel for risk analysis and management of herbicide resistance and studies on the impact of herbicide resistance Training (including training courses and materials) AGP Completed
  403 Technical guidelines for national IPM programmes to adopt ecological concepts in training programmes Training (including training courses and materials) AGP Completed
002   Support to national Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programmes.
  401 Case studies on successful applications of IPM at local levels linked across communities and also disseminated to national policy makers Studies and analyses AGP Completed
  402 Operational network among national IPM field programmes Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed
  403 Guidance to emergency, SPFS and other project activities to ensure sustainable rehabilitation Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed
  404 Support to expanding national/local IPM programmes, especially in countries covered by the SPFS that sustainably identify, analyze, enhance essential ecological processes through local decision making linked to enabling policy/institutional changes Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed
003   Principles of population dynamics, epidemiology and evolution introduced in the framework of agro-biodiversity.
  401 Technical inputs into environmental analysis of new, including biotechnological, and alternative plant protection options Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A8 Facilitating Plant Production and Protection Decision Making Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: farmers require demand-oriented, operational knowledge rather than "blanket advice". Yet, technical information on seed and planting material, crop production, plant protection and plant breeding and biotechnology is often not well referenced and tailored to particular ecological contexts at the country level.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: ensuring comprehensiveness and closer demand-orientation of technical information will lead to enhanced technology adoption and crop production. The hitherto neglected dimension of ecological knowledge will be given increased attention, to ensure that short-term objectives of crop production increases are not at the cost of long-term ecological sustainability.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farmers should obviously directly benefit from an improved knowledge base on seed and planting material, plant production and protection techniques.

Objective

  • Extension systems ensuring demand-oriented, collaborative and timely delivery of technical advice and planting material, with improved quantity, quality and relevance of technical information and reduced transaction costs during information collection and dissemination.

Indicators

  • Coverage and use of the various Internet systems collectively developed and operated with partners.
  • Increased capacity and shortened response time of supported national extension services in providing technical information.
  • Extent to which local research and extension officers are working with farmers in a demand-oriented manner.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • This was the final biennium of this programme entity (PE), which was shared between two services - AGPC and AGPP. Activities in information management in both crop production and crop protection were being folded back into the respective major discipline areas, and the principal driver, development of the EcoPort Knowledge Management platform, was reduced as EcoPort was in the process of becoming a foundation and becoming more independent of FAO financial support (MO 001). Continued development of the information system that matches crops with environment (ECOCROP) was realized. Data were collected and organized for Grassland Species Profiles and Country Pasture Profiles, which were then published on the Web and in CD-ROM format in 2005. More than 20 countries participated in input provision for Hortivar (a database on cultivar performance of horticultural crops). Work on MO 002 (development of selected crop and grassland databases) was incorporated within PE 212A1 and PE 212A3, while MO 003 (Decision-Support Systems on Plant Biotechnology) was dropped because of lack of resources.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Plant production and protection decision-support system, and attendant modular data products.
  402 Further strategic partnerships developed with data providers (institutions and individual scientists) Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  403 Inter-departmental in house collaboration and interfaces with FAO systems Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  404 Technical information related to phytosanitary issues and EcoPort Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP RNE SAFR SLAC SNEA Completed
002   Dissemination of information to countries through selected crop and grassland databases.
  402 Crop and grassland databases and information Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  403 Publications drawing on crop and grassland databases and information Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
  404 Interactive websites on crop and grassland programmes and projects Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
003   Decision support system on plant breeding and biotechnology to strengthen National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS).
  401 Assessment of biotechnology-based applications to meet development needs Studies and analyses AGP RAF RAP RNE SAFR SLAC Cancelled
  402 Provision of guidance for increased efficiency of plant breeding programmes in selected developing countries Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP RNE SAFR SLAC Modified



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212A9 Conservation and Sustainable Use of Plant Genetic Resources, including through Biotechnology, and Seed Sector Development Technical Project AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: farmers and breeders need access to genetic resources and related information and technologies, including through seed provision, to achieve sustainable increases in production and/or maintain profitability. This is underpinned by the Global Plan of Action (GPA) for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (PGRFA).
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: development of, and easier access to high-quality, locally adapted planting material, and improved on-farm management of agricultural biodiversity will enable farmers to achieve sustainable production increases, contributing to food security.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farming communities (including resource-poor farmers in marginal areas) and the public at large will benefit from increased food security.

Objective

  • Wide dissemination and use, as well as conservation of plant genetic resources and related biodiversity, through strengthening of the seed sector and plant breeding capacities at national level, and effective implementation of the GPA for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of PGRFA.

Indicators

  • Examples of activities stemming from GPA implementation.
  • Examples of national programmes and private enterprises disseminating locally-adapted cultivars and good-quality planting material in part due to this entity.
  • National programmes for PGRFA established, strengthhened, and/or incorporating seed and plant breeding activities.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Assessments of the plant-breeding and associated biotechnology capacity were carried out in 15 countries around the world. A workshop to design strategies to strengthen national and regional capacities was held in Africa (Nigeria). A similar workshop was held at FAO headquarters to bring together participants from developing countries of Africa, Asia and South America to discuss the issue of the decline in plant breeding and how it might be remedied. The results of both events were published and are being used to develop strategies to strengthen countries' capacity to use plant genetic resources for food and agriculture (PGRFA). Four case studies (Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador) on national assessments of the status of ag-biotechnology were carried out in cooperation with the REDBIO/FAO network in Latin America and the Caribbean. Stock-taking studies of the status of wild pollination services to crop productivity, and expanding the knowledge base on managing pollination services, were carried out in seven countries (Brazil, Ghana, India, Kenya, Nepal, Pakistan and South Africa). The contribution of pollination services to horticultural and fruit production of a wide range of crops has been recognized in each of these countries. Low levels of public awareness and policy support to sustain the conservation and management of pollinators in agroecosystems are impediments to sustaining pollination services. Strategies to build capacity and a cohesive knowledge base accessible to farmers and land managers through site-based participatory action research have been developed in all participating countries. Methods to assess the economic value of pollination services, to monitor the status and trends of crop pollinators and to develop site-specific pollination management plans have been developed and are being tested in selected countries. A draft methodology for the development of demonstration sites to study, train, evaluate and promote pollination services was compiled through the course of an expert technical workshop involving national coordinators and other experts from Brazil, Germany, Ghana, India, Kenya and the United Kingdom.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Capacity building for enhanced use of PGRFA, including through plant breeding strategies and biotechnology.
  401 Survey assessment and consultations on national capacity (strengths and needs) in plant breeding and biotechnology Studies and analyses AGP Completed
  402 Publications on sustainable use of PGRFA including guidelines on resource allocation and policy formulation Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP Modified
  403 An annotated "road map" (decision-support "tool box") on biotechnology- related matters Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Cancelled
  404 Policy advice and technical assistance on the use of PGRFA, in particular, plant breeding- and biotechnology-matters Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
002   Enhanced management practices of crop and crop-associated biodiversity through application of the ecosystem approach.
  401 Case studies on conservation and use of crop and crop associated biodiversity to sustain agricultural productivity and enhance livelihoods Studies and analyses AGP Completed
  402 Development of indicators for the management of PGRFA and related components of agricultural biodiversity, in support of the CBD Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP Modified
003   Support to on-farm management, exchange and improvement of PGRFA, and national seed systems ensuring complementarity between private, public and informal systems.
  404 Training and guidelines to promote complementarity between the private, public and informal seed sectors Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP Completed
004   Improved and harmonised regulatory frameworks for PGRFA, seeds and variety release.
  401 Analyses of, and advice to countries on: access and benefit sharing; variety release and seed certification and other policy aspects Studies and analyses AGP Completed
005   Due attention to seeds and PGRFA in disaster preparedness, relief and rehabilitation.
  401 Support to the implementation of the CBD programme of work on agricultural biodiversity International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
  402 Methodologies, technical guidance notes, and illustrative case studies on approaches such as seed fairs, farmer field schools, voucher schemes, participatory methods in seed technology, and community-based enterprises Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP Completed
  404 Analyses of seed systems, their resilience and role in crisis situations, including emergency response measures consistent with long-term seed security and inventories of locally-adapted crop varieties commonly grown in disaster-prone regions Studies and analyses AGP Completed
006   Improved access to, and transfer of PGRFA and seed related technologies, including biotechnology.
  401 Case studies on access to and the role of technologies, including biotechnologies, for the conservation and use of PGRFA, including socio-economic aspects, proprietary status, market opportunities and other policy dimensions Studies and analyses AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212P1 Secretariat of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) Continuing Programme Activity AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: the negative effects of plant pests on crop production and conservation, national plant resources and biodiversity.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: The IPPC provides an essential framework and forum for international cooperation, harmonisation and technical exchange between contracting parties. It is predicated on the assumption that effective multilateral action is necessary to prevent the spread and introduction of pests and to promote measures for their control.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farmers, as far as protection of their crops is concerned; general public through protection of agricultural systems and the environment, as well as facilitation of trade.

Objective

  • Promote appropriate regulatory frameworks and effective national and international phytosanitary measures for the control of plant pests.

Indicators

  • Examples of measures taken by national plant protection services in support of IPPC implementation.
  • Examples of national strategies, policies and projects formulated and/or implemented in the light of IPPC.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The revised text of the International Plant Protection Convention came into force in October 2005. Eight International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) were adopted during 2004-05, including standards for import regulatory systems, pest risk analysis for regulated non-quarantine pests, guidelines for inspection, and equivalence of phytosanitary measures. Two large workshops were held, one on the practical application of the standard on wood packaging material (ISPM 15) and the other on Plant Health Risk Analysis. During the period, 15 expert working groups and eight technical panels met (some more than once) to develop drafts for standards. The Standards Committee and the Standards Committee Working Group met seven times during the period to consider the draft standards prior to country consultation. Development of the International Phytosanitary Portal (IPP, available at https://www.ippc.int) has continued, and navigation is now available in English, French and Spanish. A newly designed IPP CD-ROM has been distributed to all official IPPC contact points. An IPPC Information Exchange Capacity Building programme was initiated, and eight regional workshops for nominated officers have been completed. The IPPC Subsidiary Body on Dispute Settlement finalized an advocacy document on dispute settlement and a dispute-settlement manual. The Secretariat convened two meetings of the Interim Commission on Phytosanitary Measures, three meetings of the IPPC Bureau and two meetings of the Strategic Planning and Technical Assistance working group. Three focus-group meetings were held - two on funding options for the IPPC and one on the development of terms of reference for a working group to consider the international recognition of pest-free areas. During the period, the Secretariat was represented at a range of meetings with international and regional organizations including the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Committee, Convention on Biological Diversity, Cartagena Protocol and the Biological Weapons Convention. Two technical consultations among regional plant-protection organizations were held.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Harmonised phytosanitary measures.
  401 Standard setting (at least 8 by biennium) through expert working groups to develop draft standards, and through organization of 2 meetings of the Interim Commission on phytosanitary measures and 4 meetings of the Standard Committee International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
  402 Secretariat Services to IPPC Other AGP Completed
  403 Support/meetings of regional plant protection organizations (Asia/Pacific Plant Protection Commission and Caribbean Plant Protection Commission), including support for development of regional phytosanitary standards Other AGP RAP SLAC Completed
002   Harmonised approaches among concerned international and regional agreements and organizations.
  401 Cooperation with WTO, CBD, WHO, World Bank, Codex Alimentarius and OIE on policies, harmonization of information exchange and capacity building International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP SLAC Completed
  403 Cooperation with Regional Plant Protection Organizations International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP RAF RAP RLC SLAC Completed
003   Exchange of mandatory phytosanitary information.
  401 Internet Phytosanitary "Portal"(IPP) to exchange official information as identified in the IPPC, as a component of a Portal on food safety/animal/plant health, including national and regional training courses to encourage participation Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  402 Assistance to national contact points to access the IPP Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed
  403 Initiation of a regional phytosanitary information system for the Asia and Pacific Plant Protection Agreement Coordination and information exchange AGP RAP Completed
004   Support national phytosanitary systems.
  402 Assistance to countries to strengthen their national phytosanitary services where possible through an integrated approach with animal health and food safety services Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212P2 Pesticide Management Continuing Programme Activity AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: the use of pesticides is necessary to sustain and increase crop production levels. However, pesticides - and notably obsolete ones - pose serious risks to human health and the environment.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: this entity supports the Interim Secretariat of the Rotterdam Convention for the application of Prior Informed Consent (PIC) Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade. The standards facilitate the trade of pesticides and agricultural products, while at the same time protecting human health and the environment. Improved information exchange, the use of less hazardous alternatives (bio-pesticides) and the disposal of obsolete pesticides are other areas of interest which should contribute to reducing risks associated with pesticides.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farmers and other users of pesticides, as well as consumers through the reduction of pesticide-related health and environmental risks.

Objective

  • Sound and safe pesticide management practices in compliance with international standards.

Indicators

  • Examples of progress made in the international regulatory framework for sound pesticide management, due in part to this entity.
  • Reduction of trade, use and storage of hazardous pesticides.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • A Panel of Experts on Pesticide Management was established; it adopted five new/revised guidelines supporting implementing new provisions. Workshops on the Pesticide Code of Conduct were held for the Near East (18 countries) and Asia and the Pacific (17 countries) regions; national meetings were held in Asia and Latin America. The FAO/WHO Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues and Joint Meeting on Pesticide Specifications met regularly. More than 40 pesticides were evaluated. Brazil, the European Commission and Mexico adopted the FAO equivalence determination process into their legal framework for pesticides. Training courses on application of equivalence determination were held in Belize, China, Colombia. The Obsolete Pesticides Programme assisted countries to identify, take measures to eliminate and put in place mechanisms to prevent recurrence of obsolete pesticides. The programme and most country activities, excepting two TCP projects in Paraguay and the Syrian Arab Republic, were achieved through extrabudgetary funds. The Africa Stockpile Programme was started (with World Bank, WWF). The Rotterdam Convention entered into force 24 February 2004; the first session of the Conference of the Parties (COP-1) convened in September 2004 (Geneva). COP-1 added 14 chemicals to the Prior Informed Consent procedure, adopted a process for Settlement of Disputes and established the expert subsidiary body: Chemical Review Committee (CRC). A strategy for regional delivery of technical assistance, developed with Regional Offices of FAO and UNEP and Basel Convention coordinating centres, representatives of intergovernmental organizations and NGOs, was adopted. The first CRC meeting, February 2005, considered 16 candidate chemicals. National and subregional meetings were convened to develop national plans for implementation of the Convention in 18 countries. COP-2, Rome, September 2005, involved over 500 participants representing more than 133 governments. Technical officers from the Regional Offices of FAO and UNEP drafted regional strategies for implementation of technical assistance activities in 2006. A Memorandum of Understanding for the joint secretariat of the Rotterdam Convention was signed by the Executive Director of UNEP and the Director-General of FAO, October/November 2005. The Convention, through its information-exchange provisions, is protecting human health and the environment from harmful effects caused by certain hazardous pesticides and chemicals. Various activities have been carried out with UNEP on implementing soil-fumigant alternatives to replace methyl bromide. They have been conducted mainly in Ecuador and Kenya at the level of growers of ornamentals. More than ten farms in Kenya have phased out the use of methyl bromide in carnation.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Updating and promotion of the International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides.
  401 Guidelines supporting the Revised Version of the International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
  403 Strengthened regional harmonization on pesticide registration in two sub-regions International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
002   Standards for pesticide product quality and recommendations for pesticide residues.
  401 Standards on pesticide quality (together with WHO) International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
  402 Substantial increase in the number of recommendations for Maximum Residue Levels to the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues (together with WHO). Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues (JMPR) International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
  403 Innovative JMPR system that can provide much larger number of MRL recommendations to Codex International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
003   Interim Secretariat to the Rotterdam Convention on Prior Informed Consent (PIC) Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade.
  401 Meetings of the Conference of Parties of the Rotterdam Convention and its subsidiary bodies Other AGP Completed
  402 Through provision of Secretariat of the Rotterdam Convention ( together with UNEP): addition of chemicals to Prior Informed Consent Procedure and mandated information exchange required to implement PIC procedure Other AGP Completed
  403 Training workshops on the implementation of the Convention Training (including training courses and materials) AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAPA SLAC Completed
004   Prevention of obsolete pesticide stocks and facilitation of their disposal.
  401 Stakeholder meetings to facilitate pesticide disposal Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF Completed
  402 Technical advice to countries on pesticides and on obsolete pesticides in particular including monitoring of disposal operations Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
005   Technologies for replacement of pesticides highly hazardous for the environment.
  401 Training workshops for replacing ozone-depletion pesticides Training (including training courses and materials) AGP Completed
  402 Promotion of alternatives to POP pesticides in two regions Training (including training courses and materials) AGP Completed
006   Dissemination of know-how and technical services for sound pesticide management.
  401 Guidance on the identification of deficiencies in national pesticide control programmes, coupled with technical assistance to countries on the implementation of pesticide management Coordination and information exchange AGP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC SNEA Completed
  403 Mainstreaming of good pesticide procurement practices in development programmes Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212P3 Migratory Pest Management Continuing Programme Activity AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: transboundary plant pests, in particular the desert locust, but also other locusts, grain-eating birds and armyworm, may cause substantial crop damage and represent a continuing threat to the livelihood of rural populations and to the overall food security of affected countries. Prevention and control programmes must be effective, while respecting human health and the environment.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: migratory pests, by nature, practically affect more than one country, and management practices in one country have effects in other countries. The management of migratory pests, therefore, needs to be supported by effective inter-country approaches and cooperation.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: farmers and pastoral communities in affected regions will benefit from improved protection of crops and pastures. The public at large will gain from the reduction and substitution of chemical pesticides with bio-pesticides.

Objective

  • Regional and inter-regional cooperation and coordination for the management of migratory pests, in particular desert locusts, but also other locusts, grain-eating birds and armyworms.

Indicators

  • Examples of concerted actions taken as a response to special alerts on critical desert locust situations.
  • Examples of policy decisions to control transboundary pests agreed among nations of the same region.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Special alerts and updates of the monthly bulletin were issued for the desert locust outbreaks that had been occurring since the end of 2003 in Western Africa and in the Central Region as a result of good and late rainfall and related successful breeding. Desert locust guidelines and standard operating procedures were produced in Arabic, English and French. Technical advice was provided on the migratory pest emergencies of the desert locust and the development of projects on desert locust pest management in Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Central Region, Chad, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Senegal and Tunisia. The geographic information system RAMSES, which is specific to the desert locust, remote-sensing expertise and eLocust, which is used for collection and transfer of field data, are key tools to obtain an overview in real time of the desert locust situation and are used to forecast and issue special alerts on critical desert locust situations. These tools, currently used at the international level, are being progressively transferred to national desert locust units.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Monthly bulletins on the desert locust situation, including forecasts, special alerts and summaries on other locust outbreaks.
  401 Monthly bulletins including forecasts, special alerts and summaries on the desert locust situation and other locust outbreaks, based on reports received from affected countries, and information on rainfall/vegetation from satellites Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  402 Guidelines and methodologies on desert locust control Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) AGP RNE SNEA Completed
  403 Desert locust databases especially the RAMSES system (Development of Reconnaissance and Management System of the Environment of Schistocerca) introduced in affected countries as a tool to improve analysis of desert locust situation and an aid to decision Information (products, systems, databases) AGP RNE SNEA Completed
  404 Installation of the rapid Locust data transmission system (eLocust) in the Western Region and the Central Region Coordination and information exchange AGP RNE SNEA Completed
002   Promotion of cooperation in desert locust management.
  401 Policy and technical decisions on standardized methodologies on improved desert locust management, research priorities and inter-country programmes Other AGP RNE SNEA Completed
  402 Secretariat to the Desert Locust Control Committee, including meeting of the Committee and its technical group and the Pesticide Referee Group Other AGP RNE Completed
  403 Secretariat to the three Regional Desert Locust Commissions, including meetings of the Locust Commissions Other AGP RNE SNEA Completed
003   Technical support services to governments on migratory pest control.
  401 Technical support to national migratory pest projects and supervision of FAO coordinated/assisted migratory pest emergency operations Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RNE SNEA Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212P4 Technical Support to the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Continuing Programme Activity AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: the conservation and sustainable use of PGRFA, facilitated access to these resources and sharing of benefits derived from their use, and are essential to food security and sustainable agriculture. The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture was underwritten by Members in this light.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: the wide implementation of the International Treaty on PGRFA will result in the conservation and enhanced use of plant genetic resources. Access by farmers to high-quality, locally-adapted planting material will provide the basis for sustainable production increases and contribute to food security and diversity.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: parties to the International Treaty on PGRFA and other countries, through effective technical support to the Treaty itself and its supporting components. Farming communities and the public at large will benefit from increased food security and diversity.

Objective

  • To assist parties in implementing the Treaty and its supporting components (the Global Plan of Action, international ex situ collections, PGRFA networks, and the global information system), hence contributing to the conservation and sustainable use of PGRFA, facilitated access to these resources and the sharing of benefits derived from their use.

Indicators

  • Summary status of implementation of, and examples of actions taken to implement the Global Plan of Action.
  • Number of information requests to the Global Information System.
  • Adoption of the revised Global Plan of Action.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The programme entity (PE) made progress in advancing the three stages - (1) gathering information, (2) planning and (3) taking action - for the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture (PGRFA) at global, regional and national levels. Reports prepared by the PE on implementation of the Global Plan of Action provided timely and useful information to the intergovernmental Commission on Genetic Resources and its members. Adoptions by the Commission of a new approach to monitor implementation of the Global Plan and of Guidelines for Country Reports were major achievements. Assessments were initiated in 22 countries following the new monitoring approach, in view of carrying them out in all countries according to a timetable agreed by the Commission. The Commission supported the objective, operational principles, activities and operational structure proposed by the PE for the establishment of a Facilitating Mechanism to implement the Global Plan of Action. These activities will contribute to the elaboration of the second Report on the State of the World's PGRFA, which will be the basis for a revised Global Plan of Action. Development of the World Information and Early Warning System (WIEWS) continued to show progress. The number of hits and requests for data from WIEWS increased by 43 percent from March to November 2005. Information on seed systems was gathered, and its integration in WIEWS is on the horizon. The PE provided Secretariat services for a successful meeting of the Commission's Working Group on PGRFA and contributed significantly to the Tenth Session of the Commission. The PE provided inputs to the work of the PAIA on Biodiversity and supported the work of other PEs, notably the Secretariat of the Commission and Interim Secretariat for the PGR Treaty. In many cases, these pertained to related fora such as the Convention on Biological Diversity. The PE learned that developing biodiversity indicators for genetic diversity and genetic vulnerability requires long-term efforts and funding in order to reach scientifically valid, useful and transparent results. The PE provided scientific and technical advice to help launch the operation of the newly established Global Crop Diversity Trust.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Rolling Global Plan of Action (GPA) for the conservation and sustainable use of PGRFA refined on the basis of an agreed periodically updated report on the State of the World's PGRFA.
  401 Thematic studies on, and indicators for, genetic diversity erosion and/or vulnerability feeding into preparations of the second report on the State of the World's PGRFA Studies and analyses AGP Modified
002   Facilitating mechanism for the implementation by all stakeholders of the Global Plan of Action.
  401 Facilitating mechanism to assist countries in the implementation of the Global Plan of Action (GPA) for the conservation and sustainable use of PGRFA Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
003   Support to international networks of ex situ collections.
  401 Technical and operational support to the International Network of ex situ collections under the auspices of FAO, including the negotiation of new agreements with institutions and countries International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed
004   Contributions to an enhanced Global Information System for PGRFA, including seeds and crop improvement.
  401 Updated country-driven assessments of state of plant genetic resources Studies and analyses AGP Modified
  402 World Information and Early Warning System (WIEWS) with an integrated Seed Information System (SIS) and an on-line, interactive information system to facilitate the monitoring of the GPA implementation and the assessment of the State of the World's PGRFA Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Modified
005   Support to seed security networks.
  401 Technical and operational support to the Seed Security Networks Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
006   Technical support to the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture and its Intergovernmental Technical Working Group (ITWG) on PGRFA.
  401 Preparation of documents and studies as requested by the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (CGRFA) and its Intergovernmental Working Group on PGRFA International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212P5 Support to Strategy Formulation and Promotion of Specific Action for Rice Development in Member Countries of the International Rice Commission (IRC) Continuing Programme Activity AGP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: Rice is the staple food for more than 3 billion people in the world and provides 50-60% of daily energy requirements in their diets. Yield increase was the principal factor contributing to the rapid growth in the world's rice production during the 1970s and 80s. But since 1990, the average growth has decelerated considerably, from about 2 percent per year in the 1980s to about 1 percent per year in the 1990s. Intensive rice production also needs to be adjusted in order to reverse growing environmental degradation, such as agro-chemical pollution, increased pest infestation and loss of biodiversity, while water and land resources for rice production have become more scarce.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: the coordination of national, regional and global efforts should greatly assist sustainable rice production for food security and poverty alleviation, and will remain the main focus of the International Rice Commission.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: rice-growing farmers should benefit from the continued refinement of national policies and technologies available for rice intensification. Rice consumers would benefit from continued availability of their staple food and price stability.

Objective

  • Adjustment of national rice development programmes, and wide implementation of the Commission's recommendations aimed at increasing rice production on a sustainable and environmentally-friendly basis.

Indicators

  • Number of staff of national programmes trained on new technologies and guidelines.
  • Number of national programmes actively implementing recommendations from the Commission.
  • Examples of corrective actions taken at the country level as a result of the Commission's recommendations.
  • Demand for IRC Newsletter.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Programme entity 212P5 gave priority to implementing the following recommendations of the Commission's Twentieth Session in 2002: (1) the International Year of Rice 2004 (IYR) and its follow-up; and (2) Collection, analysis and dissemination of rice information through publication of IRC Newsletters and proceedings of sessions, meetings and workshops, as well as technical books; provision of technical support to national programmes on actions toward sustainable rice production. During IYR, more than 800 events were carried out in 68 countries to celebrate IYR, and an IYR Web site in seven languages and numerous IYR publications all raised the awareness of stakeholders on the vital role of rice in the reduction of hunger and poverty. The success of IYR was recognized by the Second Committee on Poverty Reduction of the Sixtieth Session of the United Nations General Assembly in 2005. About 100 staff of national programmes in Asia and the Near East were trained on hybrid rice, more than 500 staff of national programmes in Asia and Latin America were trained on RiceCheck - Rice Integrated Crop Management guidelines, and about 30 staff of national programmes in Africa trained on NERICA. In addition, more than 30 national programmes had actively implemented the Commission's recommendations on hybrid rice, NERICA rice, RiceCheck and other aspects of sustainable rice production. FAO continued its support to technology transfer of hybrid rice, contributing to the most significant achievement in terms of sustainable rice production: the planting of about 1.5 million hectares of hybrid rice in Asian countries outside China (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Viet Nam) in 2004. Hybrid rice varieties were also developed in Egypt through technical support. RiceCheck methodology was developed and disseminated in four countries in Asia and in six countries in Latin America. In particular, the Thailand programme adopted RiceCheck as its process for achieving good agricultural practices. More than 1 000 copies per issue of the IRC Newsletter were sent to institutions in member countries. Similarly, hundreds of requests for technical books on rice and proceedings of IRC sessions, meetings and workshops, as well as the report of IYR implementation, were handled.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Harmonisation of action on rice development in countries through IRC sessions, meetings and steering committee, and inter-regional cooperative networks.
  401 Preparations for 21st Session of the International Rice Commission (to be held in Peru in March 2006) Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
  402 Coordination of rice activities among FAO technical units and support to the inter-regional cooperative Network on rice production systems Coordination and information exchange AGP Completed
002   Assistance for the implementation of IRC's recommendations in countries and monitoring of their impact.
  401 Implementation of the Commission's recommendations on hybrid rice, rice integrated crop management (Rice Check) and NERICA rice Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
003   Collation, analysis and publication of information on innovative rice technologies, production factors, constraints and opportunities in different agro-ecologies.
  401 Dissemination of information on technological innovations, issues, constraints and opportunities of various rice production agro-ecosystems, and capacity building Information (products, systems, databases) AGP Completed
004   Support to the International Year of Rice to be held in 2004.
  401 Harmonization and facilitation of the implementation of the IYR at all levels Coordination and information exchange AGP RAP Completed
  402 Technical support for the formulation of national strategies and programmes for sustainable rice production within member countries Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP Completed
  403 Increase in knowledge and provision of information on the key issues regarding sustainable rice production. Studies and analyses AGP Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
212S1 Advice to Countries and Support to Field Programme Technical Service Agreement AGP


Indicators

  • Requests, missions, projects fulfillment

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • AGP contributed in operational and technical management of field projects involving plant production and protection. The Obsolete Pesticides Programme implemented projects in Ethiopia, Mozambique (with Japanese funding), Paraguay and Yemen. Training for obsolete pesticide inventory and safeguarding was provided to India and, for South American countries, in Bolivia. The Africa Stockpiles Programme (ASP) was further developed with preparatory activities in Mali, Morocco, South Africa, Tunisia, United Republic of Tanzania. In August 2005, the Technical Support Unit for ASP was approved, the first directly funded GEF project at FAO. AGP continued to support TCE in emergency and rehabilitation operations, particularly in Africa, seeking to control the desert locust outbreak during 2004-2005. In the context of this outbreak, AGPP technical assistance was provided to 44 Trust Fund and 22 Technical Cooperation Programme projects totalling US$80 million. Phytosanitary capabilities were strengthened in Azerbaijan, Bhutan, Eritrea, Gabon, Gulf States, Islamic Republic of Iran, Kenya, Mauritania, Nepal, Nigeria, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia. The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) group provided technical and policy support to national IPM programmes in over 50 member countries linked through subregional knowledge-sharing networks. Support included project formulation, national IPM strategy/related pesticide policy reform, field exchanges with other member countries and field-based education for farm communities and technical advisers. In these subregions and countries, over US$30 million of IPM projects continue and expand. Contribution was made through farmer field schools and integrated control and comprehensive utilization of water hyacinth, Orobanche management in leguminous crops and striga control. Under the Agriculture Group of the Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean (RLCA)/AGPC as LTU, TCP/RLA/2901 was completed, providing an e-information system on ag-biotechnology on innovation/research, public perception and education and regulatory framework. Two regional workshops (Uruguay and Panama) elaborated the communication/information set-up presented and assessed during the Fifth Latin American Meeting on Plant Biotechnology (Dominican Republic). The REDBIO/FAO network organized a workshop for establishing a consortium for gene identification in enhancement of abiotic (drought-salinity-temperature) stress management conformed by UC-Davis, CSIRO, CIMMyT, INTA-ARG and AMBRAPA-BRA. UTF/COL/025 promoted and implemented application of good agricultural practices with small farms of the Colombian Antioquia region on sugar cane panela and feed-lot beef production, dry beans and vegetables. Food security/income generation initiatives linked to urban and peri-urban training and demonstration pilot sites at municipal level were implemented by RLCA and AGPC in Argentina (TCP/ARG/2905), Bolivia (GCP/BEL/025/BOL) and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (UTF/VEN7008).


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Technical support services to the field programme and the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS)
  401 Support to national development programmes, including projects under the SPFS and other field projects, under the broad range of disciplines, including seeds, addressed by the crops programme Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP REU RLC RNE SAFR SNEA Completed
002   Technical support to emergency and relief operation projects
  401 Support to emergency and relief activities Direct advice to Members; field programme support AGP RAF RAP REU RLC RNE SAFR SNEA Completed



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