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Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234A1 Coordination and Monitoring of the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Technical Project FIP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: in 1995, the FAO Conference adopted the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries to meet the urgent need to rationalise the fisheries sector. This project spearheads implementation of the Code, which involves, at varying degrees, all units in the Fisheries Department and associated regional teams.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: national and international fisheries policies and management practices that better reflect the principles of the Code of Conduct will lead to an improved and sustainable economic, social and environmental contribution of the fisheries sector.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: the optimisation of the contribution of fisheries to achieving benefits in terms of food, employment, recreation and trade as well as ecosystem and socio-economic well-being will benefit populations throughout the world.

Objective

  • National and international fisheries management practices, policies and legislation better reflect principles and provisions of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, specifically including gender concerns.

Indicators

  • Number and examples of countries adopting the Code and implementing corresponding management practices and legislation reflective of the Code's provisions.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • An achievement with application of the Code is 20 national plans of action to combat illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing that have been developed since adoption of the international plan of action to address IUU fishing within the Code's framework. At the Twenty-sixth Session of the Committee on Fisheries in 2005, FAO was commended on its work to support implementation of the Code and its associated instruments and called for a "decade of implementation" of the various instruments developed to ensure responsible fisheries. The Code of Conduct and its associated instruments are not binding, and therefore there is no formal acceptance or adoption process for them. Nonetheless, countries are urged to implement them at all levels to promote long-term sustainability in fisheries. Based on information reported to FAO on a biennial basis (most recently in 2004) by Members, non-governmental organizations and regional fisheries management organizations, there are concerted efforts by all countries to implement the Code. The rate at which it is being implemented varies among countries and regions depending on availability of national resources and different levels of capacity. To this end, fisheries policies and legislation are being modified to bring them into line with the Code, and on the basis of these updates, fisheries management and utilization practices are being implemented. While FAO assesses that the Code is taking root, greater progress in its implementation would be desirable, given the general state of world fish stocks. Gender issues are addressed in the implementation process: Women play a leading role in fishing communities in the processing and marketing of fish. FAO capacity-building and that of other agencies recognizes the role of women and focuses on strengthening it. Implementation of the Code in a full and effective manner is a long-term activity, principally because of lack of capacity in many developing countries. Implementation of the Code implies fundamental change in the fisheries sector along with major readjustment in fishing communities and the likely dislocation of fishers as capacity-reduction measures take effect. Action to achieve such adjustment requires strong political will on the part of governments and finding livelihood opportunities in other sectors of the economy, including in aquaculture. Against this background of variable political support, many countries are struggling with implementing new approaches to fisheries, including the precautionary and ecosystem approaches, both of which are essential to achieve long-term sustainability in fisheries.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Regular monitoring and reporting to COFI and the UN General Assembly on progress with the implementation of the Code.
  402 Reports to the UNGA and the Twenty-sixth Session of COFI International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FIP RAF RAP RLC SAFR SAPA Completed
002   Dissemination of the Code, technical guidelines, International Plans of Actions and Strategies concluded within the Code's framework.
  402 Wide dissemination of the Code, the technical guidelines and the IPOAs Coordination and information exchange FIP RAF RAP RLC SAFR SAPA Completed
  404 Dissemination of training materials on the Code and related instruments Information (products, systems, databases) FIP RAF RAP RLC SAFR SAPA Completed
003   Support to implementation of approaches for sustainable livelihoods in fishing communities.
  401 Production of two guidelines on sustainable livelihoods Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FIP RAF Completed
  402 Report on effects of HIV/AIDS on small-scale fishing communities Studies and analyses FIP RAF SAFR Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234A4 Promotion of Coastal Fisheries Management Technical Project FIP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: access to coastal fishing grounds in many countries is uncontrolled, and can often lead to over-exploitation of fish stocks, declining catches, falling incomes and worsening of living standards for fishing communities and for those serving these communities. Management plans for these areas are lacking, and where they exist, often do not prove effective.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: better management practices and controlled access to coastal fishing grounds will lead to a more sustainable exploitation of these resources.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: a sustainable balance in the harvest of coastal fish resources will benefit the environment of concerned countries and lead to improved livelihoods of fisherfolks, their families and related communities.

Objective

  • Countries will adopt methods, practices and management plans that better control access to, and exploitation of their coastal fisheries resources.

Indicators

  • Number of countries implementing or modifying plans for control of access and exploitation of their coastal fisheries resources.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • A better understanding has been reached of the challenges faced by countries in addressing access control to fisheries - and to small-scale fisheries in particular. Activities undertaken have also shown paths to solutions. This is especially the case as regards the involvement of fishers in fisheries management processes, from design to implementation. It is also important to address the issue of access limitation as both a governance and management problem. Consensus-building along key requirements of good governance is required.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Analysis of coastal fisheries management approaches.
  402 Regional Workshops on improving access limitations in small scale fisheries Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FII FIP RAP RLC Postponed
  403 Global Review of policies and methodologies to support the Johannesburg Summit (WSSD) agreement on fisheries International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FII FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA Completed
003   Global dissemination of lessons learned and methods used for planning and implementation of improved coastal fisheries management systems.



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234A5 Promotion of Appropriate National/Regional Policies for Sustainable Aquaculture Development Technical Project FIP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: current quantities of fish and shrimp, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, are insufficient to ensure adequate supplies of animal proteins, and wild fish stocks are already heavily exploited. Aquaculture has the potential to contribute substantially to increasing fish supplies, but past aquaculture development and management efforts by governments have been largely ineffective.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: favourable policies and a supportive commercial and trade environment will stimulate national and international concerns to invest in the large-scale, modern aquaculture enterprises needed to achieve a significant and rapid boost to fish supplies.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: access to increased supplies of fish, shellfish and molluscs, as well as increased employment in aquaculture and associated industries and services will benefit communities, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Objective

  • Improved national policies, strategies and legal and economic instruments in support of commercial aquaculture investment, development and trade that is sustainable in environmental and social terms.

Indicators

  • Number of countries adopting policies that specifically promote sustainable commercial aquaculture development and trade.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • At least four countries have adopted policies that specifically promote sustainable aquaculture development and trade, after having received technical assistance from FI. A number of other countries have not yet finished the adoption process. Current trends in aquaculture development relate to increasing intensification, continued diversification of species and production systems, increasing influence of markets, trade and consumption, enhanced regulation and better governance and a general drive among stakeholders for better management. These trends are demanding high-quality planning efforts and need reflection in policies and plans. The Fisheries Department emphasizes the need to think in a cross-sectoral manner, include all main stakeholders in planning processes and produce policies and plans that meet the capacity of the countries involved. Issues such as: the need to increase aquaculture production to meet growing demand for fish, given that capture-fishery production is unlikely to increase further; the fact that competition with other sectors for suitable locations for aquaculture and for access to clean water resources will further increase; the need to adjust to changes in consumer preferences through diversification and value addition; food safety and quality; and the need to implement the Code and related instruments are critical elements in most planning processes supported by FIP. In developing countries, there is increasing attention paid to the costs and benefits - in a wide sense - of the various options in developing strategies and plans for sustainable aquaculture.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Reports on sustainable commercial aquaculture.
  402 Reports on the contribution of commercial aquaculture to food security, poverty alleviation and economic growth in Sub-saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia Studies and analyses FIP RAF RLC Modified
  403 Report on international competitiveness of actual and potential species produced by aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America Studies and analyses FIP RAF RLC Completed
  404 Policies and strategies for sustainable aquaculture expansion and consolidation in Sub-Saharan Africa Direct advice to Members; field programme support FIP RAF Modified
002   Workshops for promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture.
003   Report on impacts of commercial aquaculture.



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234P2 Global Analysis of Economic and Social Trends in Fisheries and Aquaculture Continuing Programme Activity FIP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: continued long-term investment in the capture fisheries and aquaculture sectors is essential to ensure sustained food production levels and their economic viability. The success or failure of investment decisions largely depend upon the accuracy of information used to gauge sectoral trends and future prospects. Developing countries in particular lack sufficient resources to develop this information by themselves.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: improved identification and funding of services and productive assets for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture development by public and private sector stakeholders and enhanced international and regional collaboration will lead to increased production capacity.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: enhanced capture fisheries and aquaculture activities and institutions through better direction of investment will benefit fisherfolks' livelihoods, as well as consumers through increased fish availability.

Objective

  • Improved identification and funding of services and productive assets by public sector administrations and private sector enterprises for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture development; enhanced international and regional collaboration based on a more accurate and common understanding of long-term trends and emerging issues.

Indicators

  • Examples and success stories of improved resource allocation and investment decisions of public and private stakeholders using FAO's outlook studies and analyses.
  • Examples of emerging consensus on fisheries issues and policies at the international and/or regional levels based on the use of, or citing FAO studies.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2004 (SOFIA) and the World Fisheries and Aquaculture Atlas were published at the end of 2004. The auto-evaluation of the programme entity conducted in 2004 showed an increase in SOFIA's Web traffic on the FAO Web site, indicating an increase in access and use of the publications. When compared with other FAO flagship publications (SOFA, SOFI and SOFO), SOFIA enjoyed about twice the number of visits. A search for citations of SOFIA on the "Web of Science", a tool that narrowly includes only commercial peer-reviewed journals (excluding grey literature), resulted the fairly high figure of 203 citations, showing that the number of citations has recently increased considerably. It should be noted that SOFIA is a unique publication that is abundantly referenced in documents prepared by intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organizations and member countries to advance proposals and negotiating positions in international fora. In the course of the biennium, about 60 Fishery Country Profiles (FCPs) were prepared and/or revised. The auto-evaluation concluded that the FCPs constitute a valuable source of country-specific information, accessible only through the Web site and enjoying an increasing number of visitors.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   State of the World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA).
  401 Publication of the State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2004 Studies and analyses FID FIP FIR RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SLAC Completed
  402 Updating of the Web-based Fisheries Atlas Studies and analyses FIP FIR Completed
002   Projection of world fish consumption by country in 2020.
003   Monitoring and analysis of emerging issues with implications for fisheries and aquaculture at global, regional and national levels.
  401 Publication of three regional reviews on fisheries and aquaculture Studies and analyses FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SLAC Completed
  402 Updating of 60 fishery country profiles Studies and analyses FIP FIR RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SLAC Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234P3 Economic and Social Analysis of Fishery and Aquaculture Policy and Management Continuing Programme Activity FIP


Rationale

  • Development problem to be addressed: exploitation of aquatic resources in many areas of the world is unsustainable, threatening long-term availability of fish supplies and sectoral employment. In order to reduce and prevent current excessive use of fish stocks, Members require assistance in developing, implementing and enforcing binding agreements and regulations to impose restraint on the part of fishers.
  • Proposed contribution to problem resolution: international fisheries policies and instruments and appropriate national fisheries management plans, institutions and regulations will lead to increased sustainability of capture fisheries and growth of economically-viable, environmentally-safe aquaculture.
  • Intended end beneficiaries: more sustainable exploitation of aquatic resources will benefit consumers, through more secure, affordable access to fish and optimised public expenditure on fish products, as well as fishers and others deriving livelihoods or economic benefits from the sector.

Objective

  • Improved fisheries policies and instruments in support of the sustainable use of internationally shared resources and implementation of national fisheries management plans, institutions and regulations consistent with international instruments and reflecting local social and economic concerns.

Indicators

  • Number of countries implementing specific fisheries management plans and related institutions and regulations.
  • Number of international fishery instruments adopted in support of the sustainable use of fishery resources.

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Several issues of global concern in fisheries have been studied and reported upon. Significant achievements are the adoption, at the Twenty-sixth Session of Committee on Fisheries in 2005, of the Guidelines for the Ecolabelling of Fish and Fishery Products from Marine Capture Fisheries and the publication of technical guidelines on the strategy for increasing the contribution of small-scale fisheries to poverty alleviation and food security. FAO was also commended on its work on fisheries subsidies and the management of fishing capacity.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   International instruments and guidelines concerning fisheries management and policy issues.
  404 Technical guidelines on increasing the contribution of small-scale fisheries to food security and poverty alleviation Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FII FIP Completed
002   Consultations, workshops, and case studies in support of national policy development.
  401 Technical consultation on subsidies in fisheries International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FII FIP Completed
  402 Expert consultation on economic and social components of ecosystem considerations for fisheries management Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FIP Postponed
  403 Technical consultation on fish product certification and labelling International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FII FIP Completed
  405 Expert consultation on low-cost fisheries management including cost-recovery Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FIP RAF SAFR Postponed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234S1 Promotion and Strengthening of Regional Fisheries Bodies and Arrangements Technical Service Agreement FIP


Indicators

  • Participation in COFI and Regional fishery bodies

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The Twenty-sixth Session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI), the Fourth Meeting of Regional Fishery Bodies (RFB-4) and a meeting among FAO RFBs were organized/supported through this programme. One new FAO RFB, the Southwest Indian Ocean Fisheries Commission (SWIOFC), was established in 2004. Two new non-FAO RFBs, the South East Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (SEAFO) and the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC), were established with participation of FAO in the process. Some non-FAO RFBs, such as the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO), Northeast Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC), the Sub-regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC) of West Africa, the Regional Fisheries Committee for the Gulf of Guinea (COREP) of Central Africa, SEAFO and WCPFC, were observed by FI staff in order to strengthen collaboration between FAO and those bodies. One of the emerging issues on RFBs is a performance review. Following consideration of the matter in COFI-26 and RFB-4, NEAFC agreed to undertake a performance review of the Commission. FAO recommended one of the review panel members. The review of FAO RFBs is also being conducted as follow-up to the meeting among FAO RFBs and as part of the FAO reform process. The review process of the UN Fish Stock Agreement by the UN also highlights the important role of RFBs, and FAO actively participates in the process. FAO also analyses and maintains information on RFBs, including FI's Web site of RFBs, and responds to any inquiries on RFBs.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Support to FAO and non-FAO Regional Fishery Bodies and to COFI
  401 Report of the Twenty-sixth Session of COFI International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FID FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed
  402 Report of nine sessions of regional fishery bodies (GFCM, CECAF, CIFA, APFIC, COPESCAL, WECAFC, RECOFI, EIFAC and IOTC) International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FID FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed
  403 Reports of studies and reviews Studies and analyses FIP Completed
  404 Report of the Fifth Session of ACFR International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FID FIP Completed
002   Liaision with UN and other Inter Governmental Organisations; monitoring of the development and implementation of international instruments related to capture fisheries & aquaculture.
  401 Technical papers on international instruments (IUU, strengthening of regional fishery bodies) Coordination and information exchange FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed
  402 Technical paper on the role of regional fishery bodies in international fisheries Information (products, systems, databases) FIP Completed
  403 Technical paper on decision-making process within regional fishery bodies Information (products, systems, databases) FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed
  404 Report of the Fourth Session of RFBs meeting International undertakings, agreements/conventions and standards FID FIP Completed
003   Monitoring and reporting on the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), and, co-ordination of CCRF up-dating
  401 Technical papers on the effective implementation of the Code Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FIP Completed
  402 Technical papers on human capacity building and institutional strengthening for the implementation of the Code Methodologies and guidelines (including pilot testing and demonstration) FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed



Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
234S2 Direct Support to Countries in Fisheries Policy and Management Technical Service Agreement FIP


Indicators

  • Percent of requests handled to satisfaction of Member requesting assistance

2004-05 Implementation Progress - Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Direct support has been provided to a number of countries, in some instances in cooperation with the FishCode Programme and the Technical Cooperation Programme, on fisheries policy and management strategy formulation. In Thailand, for example, a national seminar developed options for the reduction and management of commercial fishing capacity. In Viet Nam, a national strategy was developed through a consultative process with stakeholders for marine fisheries management and development. This support was greatly valued by beneficiary countries. Technical assistance was provided to member countries of the Central American Organization of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Sector (OSPESCA) (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama) in the formulation of their National Plans of Action - on sharks, illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing (IUU) and management of fishing capacity.


Major Output Biennial Output Title Type Contributing Divisions (Lead Division in bold) Status
001   Advice on national policies for capture fisheries and aquaculture development and management
  401 Country specific advice on sustainable fisheries Direct advice to Members; field programme support FIP RAF RAP RLC RNE SAFR SAPA SLAC Completed
002   Advice on issues related to management of specific capture fisheries or aquaculture sectors.



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