CUBATable of ContentsTable of ContentsProgramme Entity 2KP01 Output Status

Programme 4A: UN cooperation, integration and monitoring

Regular Programme   (USD 000)  
  Net Appropriation 12,864  
  Actual Income 869  
  Adjusted Programme of Work 13,733  
  Expenditure at budget rate 13,814  
  Variance of expenditure (Over)/Under (81)  
Extra budgetary Support to the Regular Programme   1,067  
Field Programme  
  Extra budgetary Support to Field Programme/Assistance to Member Countries 2,371  
  Extra budgetary funded Emergencies 0  
  TCP and SPFS delivery 50  
  Total Field Programme delivery 2,421  
Total Expenditure   17,302  


Type of Output Approved in PWB Cancelled/ Postponed Unplanned Delivered Total Delivered Delivered Unmodified Delivered Modified Percent Delivered
Information exchange and coordination 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Policy and legislative advice 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Provision of services to staff, departments and members 12 0 3 15 15 0 125%
Technical advice to Members and field programme support 2 0 0 2 2 0 100%
Total 16 0 3 19 19 0 119%


Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4AP04 FAO Participation in cooperation with United Nations and Intergovernmental Organizations at corporate level Continuing Service UNC


Expected Benefits

  • FAO to be perceived by its Membership and by other UN system organizations as a valid and active partner, contributing to multisectoral analysis of key policy issues before the UN system and to multisectoral approaches advocated at national and community level. More effective use of staff time and travel funds, and policy coherence in positions taken, at UN meetings. Information selection and filtering from a vast collection of UN system documentation and news, so that concerned units are able to keep abreast of relevant developments in the UN system.

Indicators

  • FAO policy on and facilitation of cooperative arrangements with UN system entities
    • Increase in advice provided by the Office of the Director-General (ODG) and concerned units on policy issues relating to the preparation of FAO's cooperative agreements with UN system entities
  • FAO policy and participation in high-level UN system coordination mechanisms at corporate level
    • Increase in advice provided by the Office of the Director-General (ODG), FAO technical and non-technical departments and FAO Liaison Offices with the United Nations; increased FAO participation in and/or contribution to high-level UN system coordination mechanisms at corporate level, UN system initiatives and preparation of reports to central intergovernmental bodies
  • UN system meetings management
    • Number of meetings handled
  • UN documentation service
    • Effective selection and distribution of UN documents
  • FAO participation in UN system intergovernmental bodies and liaison with their secretariats - New York
    • Number of intergovernmental meetings of the GA and ECOSOC, as well as interagency meetings attended by LONY
    • Number of entities with whom LONY liaises on behalf of FAO: Member States, specialized agencies, secretariats of UN organizations, other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, and private institutions
  • FAO participation in UN system intergovernmental bodies and liaison with their secretariats - Geneva
    • Number of UN system meetings attended by LOGE
    • Number of entities with whom LOGE liaises on behalf of FAO: the UN system entities, secretariats of these organizations, and other intergovernmental, non-governmental and private institutions

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Under this PE, activities were implemented relating to (i) coordination of UN reform processes and promotion of strengthened collaboration among Rome-based agencies; (ii) liaison with and servicing of FAO's external High-level Committee on the MDGs; and (iii) donor liaison. In June 2007, the Organization organized a Seminar for Permanent Representatives at headquarters on "FAO's engagement in the UN Reform and Cooperation between the Rome-based Agencies". Implemented under this PE was work related to the systematic and proactive contribution of FAO to policy coherence and coordination across the UN system at intergovernmental and interagency levels, and the contribution to interagency policy discussions on CEB reform and UN reform at country level. Activities were also undertaken under PE 4AP04 relating to the the participation of the Director-General at meetings of the United Nations Systems' Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) and representation the Organization at meetings of the High-level Committee on Programmes (HLCP), the main preparatory body of CEB, including contributing to UN system-wide initiatives on climate change. The Organization participated in the work of the United Nations Development Group (UNDG), the main inter-agency mechanism for providing policy guidance on UN reform at country level.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4AP05 FAO Participation in cooperation with United Nations at field level Continuing Programme Activity TCA


Objective

  • Improved policy and institutional frameworks aimed at enhancing the attention given in national development to agriculture, rural development and food security and to ensuring adequate allocation of financial resources in these fields.

Indicators

  • Number of NMTPFs and the position of agriculture within national development frameworks and resource allocation

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Since the introduction of National Medium-Term Priority Framework (NMTPF) in 2005, there has been a significant improvement in the integration of agricultural priorities in the UN development framework, particularly in the eight pilot countries. The NMTPF has also contributed to improved definition of FAO's technical assistance priorities in the countries on the basis of clearly set criteria, including comparative advantages, FAO absorption capacity, the availability of technical expertise and compatibility with FAO strategic objectives and the Programme of Work and Budget. The biennium has seen a trend towards more uniform quality of reports, though there is still room for improvement in this area. A number of lessons can be drawn from the relatively short experience of NMTPF: 1) a good consultation process with national and international partners at the country level is a sine qua non condition for the formulation of an effective NMTPF; 2) the NMTPF is more likely to identify the FAO priority areas of intervention if it is conducted as a corporate exercise based on strong coordination at the country, regional and headquarters levels; 3) the capacity of FAO field offices to deliver, not only in joint programming exercises but more importantly in joint programmes, needs to be addressed through the allocation of resources from both Regular Programme and extra-budgetary sources; 4) FAO's involvement in joint programming exercises with the UN must also include regional and subregional offices, where appropriate; 5) FAO's business model (as well as that of other specialized agencies) needs to be further articulated and promoted within the donor community, this being a model which differs fundamentally from that of the UN Funds and Programmes (large-scale quick-impact development operations vs. discrete highly specialized technical expertise, development impact of which is slower and less tangible).

Programme 4B: Coordination of decentralized services

Regular Programme   (USD 000)  
  Net Appropriation 20,306  
  Actual Income 214  
  Adjusted Programme of Work 20,520  
  Expenditure at budget rate 19,382  
  Variance of expenditure (Over)/Under 1,138  
Extra budgetary Support to the Regular Programme   0  
Field Programme  
  Extra budgetary Support to Field Programme/Assistance to Member Countries 0  
  Extra budgetary funded Emergencies 0  
  TCP and SPFS delivery 0  
  Total Field Programme delivery 0  
Total Expenditure   19,382  


Type of Output Approved in PWB Cancelled/ Postponed Unplanned Delivered Total Delivered Delivered Unmodified Delivered Modified Percent Delivered
Capacity building 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Information exchange and coordination 2 (1) 0 1 1 0 50%
Information products, systems, databases 4 0 0 4 4 0 100%
Other 6 (1) 0 5 5 0 83%
Provision of services to staff, departments and members 35 (6) 1 30 30 0 86%
Total 48 (8) 1 41 41 0 85%


Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4BP02 Coordination and Decentralization Policy Continuing Service OCD


Expected Benefits

  • This entity, besides facilitating the efficient and harmonious working of the various structures of the Organization, will specifically ensure that (i) the Senior Management and Governing Bodies are apprised in a timely manner of the policy and implementation measures required to realize the coordination and decentralization objectives; (ii) adequate measures are put in place to promote organizational learning on coordination and decentralization; (iii) emerging as well as ad hoc coordination issues are identified and resolved on a regular basis; (iv) necessary support is provided for the effective integration of ROs, SROs, FAORs and REIO contact points in the design and implementation of corporate endeavours; and (v) the FAO Regional Conferences are organized effectively.

Indicators

  • Formulation and monitoring the implementation of coordination and decentralization policy
    • Timely and effective resolution of coordination and decentralization issues at the appropriate level
  • Coordination Support to the Regional Conferences, Regional Offices, Sub-regional Offices, Liaison Offices, FAOR Offices and Contact Points with REIOS
    • Effective participatory processes in corporate undertakings reflecting decentralized offices' views
  • Contribution to Inter-departmental Coordination
    • Corporate coordination issues successfully addressed through adequate tools

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The context for implementation of this programme entity was provided by the Reform decisions taken by the FAO Conference in November 2005. These involved introducing a new model of decentralization in Africa and Central Asia. During 2007, the Reform was expanded to Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean. A new model for division of responsibilities and relationships between headquarters and the decentralized offices (DOs) was designed in a broad participative process involving the governing bodies, PPAB, an interdepartmental working group and numerous ad-hoc consultations with DOs. The process resulted in a new Circular on Responsibilities and Relationships regulating collaboration between headquarters and the DOs. The Functional Statements of regional offices (ROs), subregional offices and the FAORs were revised accordingly The organization of regional conferences (RCs) in 2006 was completed; improvements included limiting the number of side events, ensuring an appropriate mix of FAO languages, delegating greater authority to ROs for their preparation and deepening synergies between RCs and various REIOs. Preparation of the 2008 RCs started in 2006-07 and is on schedule. To contain costs, ROs are now using local translation for some documents, with final quality check by KC. Under this PE, FAO's involvement in the "Delivery as One" UN reform process was facilitated with special focus on pilot country activities. This PE also covers FAO participation in the UNDG RC Issues Group, the UNDG Management and other UNDG groups.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4BP03 Oversight, Operations and Management Support to the Decentralized Offices Continuing Service OCD


Expected Benefits

  • An improved performance of the expanding decentralized offices network (currently covering more than 130 locations) with respect to the global, regional and country level work of the Organization; consolidated and cost-effective oversight, operational and management support mechanisms; improved development and implementation of the country offices field programme; optimal use of human and financial resources.

Indicators

  • Oversight and Operations of the Decentralized Offices
    • Resources in kind and in cash mobilized
    • Number of briefings organized
    • Number of training courses organized
    • Number of guidelines and best practices released
    • Number of staff selected
    • Number of field missions implemented
    • Timely follow-up on Audit reports recommendations
  • Policy Advice and Reporting to Senior Management and Governing Bodies on Decentralized Offices Matters
    • Number of offices established
    • Number and quality of periodic reports and ad hoc reports on the FAOR network
    • Number of key communications drafted
  • Provision of Administrative, Budgetary, Information Technology and Communication Support for Decentralized Offices
    • Quality and timeliness of financial plans and budget allotments; utilization of resources by Country Offices
    • Feedback from country offices on office management and other support provided
    • Number of corrective and guidance letters issued to country offices
    • Effective use of COIN (Country Offices Information System)
    • Performance of IT infrastructure in Country Offices

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • During the biennium, a total of 50 heads of decentralized offices (Dos) were selected and briefed and a total of 51 missions to DOs were undertaken, including those related to the establishment of new subregional offices (SROs). A total of 62 Audit reports, including over 400 recommendations, were reviewed and followed up. A new FAOR Performance Appraisal and Management System (PEMS) enabling a two-way evaluation process was launched. In the area of capacity building, the Organization planned, and delivered: i) four Refresher Briefings cum Management Development and Communication courses with the participation of 43 FAORs; ii) four courses for 71 Assistant FAORs (Programme and Administration); iii) a Training of Trainers course for IAOs; (iv) two courses on Administration for 18 FAOR staff, six training courses on Emergencies and two further courses on Administration for staff dealing with emergencies for FAOR worldwide. In connection with the FAO Reform, six agreements for the opening of new DOs were finalized. Negotiations were initiated for the opening of one additional SRO and one liaison office. In the area of human resources management and planning, some 50 national professionals were recruited and new staffing structures were implemented in FAO country offices. Due to budgetary constraints, a total of 87 posts were abolished in FAO Representations. FAO has continued to review office management procedures and guidelines. The FAOR Handbook and several important administrative and budgetary guidelines were translated into the official languages. Significant investments in renovation of premises and replacement of obsolete FAOR fixed assets were made. Under this PE, the Organization regularly reviewed and reported on FAORs' budgetary performance. In the area of management information systems, the Country Office Information Network has been extended to include a wider range of office management functions.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4BS01 FAOR support to Knowledge Management, Networking and Advocacy Support Services to Members and Other Partners OCD


Expected Benefits

  • This entity will lead to improved communications with countries and stakeholders and will foster and promote networking, media laision and linkages with research and academic institutions. Besides contributing to image building and wider understanding of FAO's mandate and mission, the participation of FAO in, and its support to, the country-level thematic groups and other knowledge generation mechanisms will lead to identification of capacity-building needs and their integration into FAO's programmes and activities. This will also engender better collaboration with partners and greater public support for FAO's programmes.

Indicators

  • Country-level Networking: liaison with the Media and WFD; networking with research and academic institutions, NGOs, library systems and other knowledge centres
    • Level of participation in WFD and TeleFood activities
    • Number of users of FAO library
    • Number of users of FAO Web site
    • Evidence of FAO visibility in the media (number of times that FAO is mentioned in printed and electronic media and quality of this media attention)
    • Satisfaction of national partners and knowledge generation and management networks with the quality of FAO's input, clarity of FAO's messages and the correctness of their understanding of what FAO does
    • Acceptance of FAO's role as lead agency in the thematic groups and knowledge management systems on food and agriculture
  • Support to Agricultural Information and Knowledge Management; (WAICENT, Country level thematic groups and knowledge generation arrangements)
    • Number of FAORs with functioning reference library
    • Statistics of access to local Web site
    • Number of publications distributed
    • Number of FAORs with direct connection and capacity for virtual library access
    • Number of FAORs with direct connections and dedicated space and computers for use of WAICENT

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • FAO Representations continued their liaison with national institutions for knowledge exchange through Letters of Agreement, use of local consultants, TCDC/TCCT and South-South cooperation arrangements. They proactively participated in the work of the United Nations Country Teams and the related thematic groups. During the biennium, FAO Representatives advocated the Organization's policy positions, functioned as spokespeople for FAO when contacted by local media and through their participation in the national policy dialogue. As a result of their close contacts with relevant ministries, they identified needs for direct support, either of an emergency, rehabilitation or development character. Continuing support was provided to building national capacities to address both short-term emergency situations and long-term development objectives without external support.

Programme 4C: Food security, poverty reduction and other development cooperation programmes

Regular Programme   (USD 000)  
  Net Appropriation 63,159  
  Actual Income 25,126  
  Adjusted Programme of Work 88,285  
  Expenditure at budget rate 90,986  
  Variance of expenditure (Over)/Under (2,701)  
Extra budgetary Support to the Regular Programme   429  
Field Programme  
  Extra budgetary Support to Field Programme/Assistance to Member Countries 42,307  
  Extra budgetary funded Emergencies 1,264  
  TCP and SPFS delivery 4,376  
  Total Field Programme delivery 47,947  
Total Expenditure   139,362  


Type of Output Approved in PWB Cancelled/ Postponed Unplanned Delivered Total Delivered Delivered Unmodified Delivered Modified Percent Delivered
Capacity building 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Information exchange and coordination 7 0 1 8 8 0 114%
Information products, systems, databases 7 (1) 1 7 7 0 100%
Other 3 0 0 3 3 0 100%
Provision of services to staff, departments and members 20 (3) 1 18 18 0 90%
Technical advice to Members and field programme support 12 0 0 12 10 2 100%
Total 50 (4) 3 49 47 2 98%


Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4CA01 Field programme Coordination, Monitoring, Inspection and Reporting Project - Non-Tech TCO


Expected Benefits

  • Improved performance and cost-effectiveness of field programme. Greater responsiveness to external demands through an improved framework for field programme operations based on updated policies, procedures and guidelines. Enhanced credibility of the Organization as a reliable and efficient partner in emergency and development cooperation. Enhanced access by governments to project information, improving transparency and trust in FAO.

Indicators

  • Enhanced interaction and integration of FPMIS with other corporate tools (e.g. PIRES, FAS, Data Warehouse, HR Planning, ATLAS and COIN)
    • Elimination of redundant departmental field programme related databases
    • Evidence of integration of FPMIS into other corporate databases
  • Accessibility of FPMIS worldwide, including access by project managers authorized to monitor project activities
    • Reduced field programme implementation delays and cost overruns
    • Reduced follow-up and monitoring costs
    • Regular use by all budget holders
  • Adaptation of FPMIS to new technology, IT infrastructure standards and new user requirements
    • Improved FPMIS efficiency
    • Reduction of ad hoc queries for information that can be obtained directly from FPMIS
  • Maintenance and dissemination of policies, procedures and guidelines and of the Field Programme Manual
    • User satisfaction and feedback from budget holders
    • Elimination of obsolete procedures
    • Reduction in number of queries from users and reduced procedural problems identified by auditors
  • Consistent framework for field programme operations and improved knowledge on field programme operations and management imparted to budget holders
    • Competitive costs for supporting the field programme
    • Number of briefings and training workshops
    • Number of project budget holders or assistants trained
  • Field inspection and Ad hoc reviews to address atypical or complex field programme situations
    • Reduction in number of crises
  • Secretariat of field programme related committees and working groups
    • Number of meetings serviced
    • Effective follow-up to recommendations
  • Management and maintenance of FPMIS database and of supporting applications
    • Effective use by FAO staff of FPMIS in all locations
  • Development and maintenance of dedicated FPMIS modules (e.g. technical departments, TCE, TCOS, TCOT, TCAP, Knowledge Network)
    • Corporate nature of FPMIS
  • Development and maintenance of Country Intelligence System as per IDWG cluster 4c
    • Adequacy of CIM content and its use
  • Development and maintenance of customized versions of FPMIS for large scale projects
    • Number of modules operational and extent of use
  • Support to MIS, including development and maintenance of related reports
    • Effectiveness of report structure in the MIS
  • Field programme-related reports based on analysis of available data, monitoring tools and special studies
    • Number of reports issued
  • Maintenance and enhancement of FPMIS PermRep Module
    • Access to FPMIS PermRep Module
  • Support to editing, processing and distribution to recipient countries of projects terminal reports and statements
    • Number of terminal reports/statements issued

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • The policies, procedures and guidelines providing the framework for field programme operations continued to be updated, revised and established during the biennium. Among these, the Field Programme Circular 2007/02 on the Standard Project Document Format, which introduces results-based management through logical framework analysis, has already begun to help standardize the quality and content of project documents, and will provide a basis for qualitative monitoring throughout the project life cycle. A number of fundamental procedures (such as those on Project Task Force consultations and Operational Clearance) were updated to reflect changes in the responsibilities for project formulation and operations introduced with the FAO Reform. In addition, through various corporate and inter-agency working groups, there has been active participation in the analysis, shaping and influencing of operational policies and procedures being developed within the context of the UN Reform, "Delivering as One" process and the implementation of Conference Resolution 2005/13 regarding the Triennial Comprehensive Policy Review. Ongoing enhancements of the Field Programme Management Information System enabled governments as well as staff at headquarters and in decentralized offices to be provided with improved field project information and monitoring facilities, including customized applications developed for several departments.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4CP01 Management and Coordination - SPFS/NPFS/RPFS/SSC/pro-poor small projects Continuing Programme Activity TCO


Objective

  • Effective coordination, monitoring and evaluation of the SPFS/NPFS/RPFS/pro-poor small projects; promotion of South-South Cooperation (SSC) initiatives; increased mobilization of funds from donors and financial institutions in support of food security, improvement of people's access to food and promotion of diversified food production on a self-reliant basis through better input supply services and access to village credit.

Indicators

  • Number of active SSC agreements, including number of experts contracted
  • Number of countries engaged in the SPFS/NPFS/RPFS
  • Contributions mobilized for SPFS/NPFS/RPFS from donors and recipient countries
  • Proportion of farmers supported in areas where SPFS/NPFS/RPFS are implemented
  • Stability of food production in countries where SPFS/NPFS/RPFS are being implemented
  • Increased production and diversification of food in countries where SPFS/NPFS/RPFS are being implemented
  • Number of approved and implemented pro-poor small community TeleFood projects

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Activities included the coordination, monitoring and evaluation of Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS), National Programmes for Food Security (NPFSs), Regional Programmes for Food Security (RPFSs), South-South Cooperation (SSC) and pro-poor small projects. During the biennium, support to the formulation and implementation of projects and programmes was provided and concept papers, information notes and guidelines were prepared and distributed. Successful SPFS projects have improved yields, household incomes, general nutrition and the welfare of participants. By end of 2007, 106 countries had implemented SPFS activities. SPFS pilot activities are gradually being phased out and are expected to be completed by 31/12/2008. FAO is now concentrating on supporting countries and organizations in formulating and implementing more comprehensive programmes. NPFSs were getting underway in more than 50 countries, among which 15 are under implementation, and RPFSs were being implemented in four REIOs. PBE conducted evaluations of SPFS in several countries, and of the RPFS-Pacific, with positive outcomes. Under the SSC initiative, 39 agreements were signed (two in 2006-07) and more than 1 450 cooperants (cumulative) were fielded in 32 countries and two subregions to support SPFS projects. FAO has entered into a strategic alliance with the Government of China with a view to deploying an additional 3 000 SSC cooperants to NPFSs and RPFSs. This level of expertise will strengthen the role and impact of SSC in support of NPFS and RPFS in numbers and technical coverage. The concrete results of TeleFood projects can be seen in over 2 000 projects in more than 125 countries, and their success has stimulated the flow of requests. Over the biennium, more than 400 projects were approved. An external evaluation of TeleFood was undertaken in 2006, resulting in recommendations to improve the quality of fundraising and advocacy activities and of project formulation and implementation.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4CP05 Analysis of Country and Regional Information on Agricultural Development and its Economic, Social and Political Context Continuing Programme Activity TCA


Objective

  • Enhanced country knowledge in order to enable FAO to provide well-tailored technical assistance for agricultural development and food security.

Indicators

  • Use of regional country information systems
  • Effective inputs of country task forces
  • Better use of default country intelligence and FAO outlook study assessments

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Electronically produced country, regional and subregional briefs were released in 2006 and 2007 using the Briefs On Line system (BOL), a computer-based system that controls the continuous collection and processing of economic, social, agricultural, political and project information from various internal and external sources for the production of country briefs covering all major aspects of FAO's activity. The system was upgraded, allowing all relevant FAO units to provide their inputs through a user-friendly interface, and provides a key service to senior management by supplying updated briefs at short notice. The production of briefs has been increased (to 800 in 2006 and over 2 000 in 2007) by eliminating manual routines and placing greater emphasis on the substance and quality of information. The system provides facilities for the dissemination of briefs to other headquarters and decentralized units and an electronic archive of country briefs, as well as a platform for storing consistent sets of key policy assistance documents for each country. A basic set of the most important policy assistance documents and reports, which could serve as a main reference for policies, strategies and action programmes in the broad area of agriculture and rural development in a given country, has been established. This covers around 160 recipient countries and will be accessible through Intranet in 2008. While the preparation of regional and subregional briefs continues on an ad-hoc and manual basis, future plans could include their preparation using BOL. An additional recent activity is the preparation, in collaboration with KCI, of briefs for Permanent Representatives based on the country information available in BOL and accessible through the system.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4CP06 Regional field programme operations and monitoring Continuing Service TCO


Expected Benefits

  • The entity will provide effective advice and support to budget holders in the region and improve the response capacity of the Organization. Through effective monitoring, preventive measures can be taken to address problems in project operations. Reliable delivery forecasts permit management to plan staffing levels and forecast revenues. Timely reports for regional and headquarters management facilitate decisions regarding field programme policies and improve general oversight. The result is a consistent approach to administrative and operational issues in the implementation of the field programme. Timely and efficient operation of technical cooperation projects entrusted to the regional office.

Indicators

  • Advice and support to budget holders in the region
    • Reduction of critical Audit Reports
    • Improved delivery performance by budget holders (timeliness, reduction of follow-up activities)
  • Monitoring of regional project pipeline and coordination of delivery forecasts
    • Ex post facto accuracy of forecasts
    • Effective use of pipeline information in negotiations
  • Management reports for the Regional Representative and headquarters
    • Positive feedback from users
    • Effective follow-up to recommendations/issues
    • Post factum reliability of delivery forecasts
  • Operational support to the field programme
    • Field programme delivery efficiency

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • In line with the FAO Reform and further decentralization, project operations were transferred from regional to subregional offices in Africa (SFC, SFE, SFS, SFW), the Caribbean and the South Pacific; to FAORs under the outposted technical officer (OTO) scheme; and to FAORs holding double/multiple accreditations. Those transfers are evidence of the ongoing empowerment of decentralized offices to take on additional operational responsibility. Although the original biennial output did not anticipate these changes, and in spite of reduced resources and staffing, delivery levels have been maintained. Greater use of the Field Programme Management Information System (FPMIS ) to update delivery estimates with more accurate figures and better planning of external income expected from implementation capacity further evidences the empowerment of decentralized offices. The provision of monitoring tools and training improved project monitoring. While further training is required for new budget holders at country level and in regional/subregional offices, there has been a steady increase in the learning curve of budget holders in the regions; country offices that have received intensive training and operational backstopping now seldom require assistance on operational matters. Based on updated monthly delivery figures, lists of critical projects are identified for FAORs & RTOs for review, follow-up action and closer monitoring, especially those with low delivery. Quarterly project implementation reports (QPIRs) have facilitated enhanced monitoring, as have other features available through the FPMIS. Electronic QPIRs for use by budget holders/project personnel would further enhance their use. Enhanced pipeline monitoring through FPMIS would assist the monitoring of field programme development. Qualitative monitoring will be improved with additional capacity in 2008-09 in subregional offices (i.e. Field Programme Support and Monitoring Officers).

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4CS07 FAOR support to National Development and Emergencies/Rehabilitation Support Services to Members and Other Partners OCD


Expected Benefits

  • Relevant and timely services to address needs of countries, including responsiveness to emergencies. Efficient and cost-effective support to emergency/non-emergency programme development and operation; increased investment in the agriculture sector.

Indicators

  • Contributions to Field Programme Development and Resources Mobilization
    • Size of the field programme
    • Volume of pipeline of project proposals
  • Administrative and Operational Support to Non-Emergency Field Programme
    • Annual delivery performance
    • Quality and timeliness of periodic project progress reports
  • Administrative and Operational Support to National Emergencies
    • Annual delivery performance of emergency projects
    • Compliance with TCE's operational guidance
    • Evidence of role of the FAOR in mobilizing FAO's emergency response
  • Coordination of FAO's country support to MDGs and Poverty Reduction Strategies
    • Number of NMTPFs successfully negotiated
    • Catalytic role for the ratification of international treaties
    • Effective participation in UN initiatives, including MDG, PRSP, CCDA, UNDAF, CAP, thematic groups
    • Satisfaction of host government with quality of FAOR's contribution to national policy discussions
    • Increased share of national budget and ODA going to the food and agriculture sector

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • During the biennium, FAO Representations improved their capacity to operate both development and emergency projects. This has been facilitated by the increased share of administrative and operational support allocation (50 percent), as well as through the implementation of streamlining measures such as increased delegation of authority on Letters of Agreement and procurement, delegation of authority to recruit General Service staff and a rationalization of the staffing structure. Additional elements contributing to the FAOR enhanced operational capacity have included the significant increase in opportunities for staff development in different areas e.g. refresher briefings, management development courses, courses in administration, logical framework, project cycle overview. Efforts were also made to improve FAO's visibility in developing countries through the provision of additional resources for organizing awareness events involving host governments, donors and other UN agencies' Representatives. Increasingly, FAO Representatives use the process of preparing a National Medium-term Priority Framework (NMTPF) as a means of prioritizing FAO assistance, building consensus among stakeholders and mobilizing resources. NMTPFs have also proved a useful element for FAO's input to joint UN assessments and programming exercises such as the CCA, UNDAF and, in the eight 'Delivering as One' pilot countries, to the One Plan. They also facilitated, in the Reform regions, the development of a strategy and work programme for the Subregional Multidisciplinary Teams of the subregional offices. FAORs continued to participate in planning and coordination initiatives, including Thematic Groups and CAP in addition to the CCA and UNDAF.

Programme 4D: Emergency and post crisis management

Regular Programme   (USD 000)  
  Net Appropriation 963  
  Actual Income 663  
  Adjusted Programme of Work 1,626  
  Expenditure at budget rate 1,839  
  Variance of expenditure (Over)/Under (213)  
Extra budgetary Support to the Regular Programme   250  
Field Programme  
  Extra budgetary Support to Field Programme/Assistance to Member Countries 1,080  
  Extra budgetary funded Emergencies 19,619  
  TCP and SPFS delivery 419  
  Total Field Programme delivery 21,118  
Total Expenditure   23,207  


Type of Output Approved in PWB Cancelled/ Postponed Unplanned Delivered Total Delivered Delivered Unmodified Delivered Modified Percent Delivered
Capacity building 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Information exchange and coordination 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Information products, systems, databases 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Other 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Policy and legislative advice 1 (1) 0 0 0 0 0%
Provision of services to staff, departments and members 2 0 0 2 2 0 100%
Technical advice to Members and field programme support 2 (1) 0 1 1 0 50%
Total 9 (2) 0 7 7 0 78%


Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4DS01 Implementation of Emergency Programme Support Services to Members and Other Partners TCE


Expected Benefits

  • FAO's work in post-disaster and complex emergency situations emphasizes the protection of agricultural and rural livelihoods and contributes to the phasing out of food aid and the reconstruction of food and agricultural production systems, which are essential for providing the affected populations with stable opportunities for development.

Indicators

  • Coordinated intervention in emergency and post-crisis situations
    • FAO recognized as a key player in emergency and early rehabilitation programmes
  • Streamlining of FAO's response in emergency and post-crisis situations
    • Evidence that FAO's strategy in emergency context is widely shared among FAO's staff
    • A full set of procedures for emergency operations have been prepared, endorsed and implemented

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • FAO's emergency and rehabilitation programme delivery reached almost US$385 million in 2006-07. At the end of 2007, operations were implemented in 76 countries, supported by 34 Emergency Coordination Units.Recognized as the leader of the agricultural sector in the UN cluster approach, FAO led programmes in countries and regions experiencing food and agriculture crises, including Indonesia, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, the Sudan, the Great Lakes Region, southern Africa and Latin America. FAO engaged worldwide in responding to transboundary pests and animal diseases, such as locusts and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). During 2006-07 donors increased extra-budgetary voluntary contributions from USD440 million to over USD650 million. . Donor support was solicited mainly through inter-agency appeals, other emergency or transitional appeals and strategy papers/updates on behalf of countries affected by disasters. In 2006-07, FAO participated in 22 UN flash appeals for natural disaster-stricken countries and in the annual UN humanitarian appeal .FAO coordinated the components of the Consolidated Appeals Process falling within its mandate which brought aid organizations together to plan, implement and monitor their response to disasters and emergencies..Headquarters staff, FAO Representativesa dn Emergency coordinators form all regions engaged to sharing lessons learnt and agree ways to coordinate effectively emergency activities. As a result, a manual of emergency operations was finalized in the first half of 2008. Progress has been achieved in streamling procedures , in particular through the increased delegations provided by the Director-general and the Emergency Projects budgeting guidelines published in FPMIS in 2007. It is foreseen that the Evaluation of FAO’s operational capacity in Emergencies together with the Root and Branch Review, that both started in early 2008, will pave the way towards a more effective business model for emergency operations.

Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4DS02 Disaster preparedness, Mitigation and Support to Emergency and Rehabilitation Programme Support Services to Members and Other Partners TCD


Expected Benefits

  • The expected benefits of integrating technical work in sectors such as animal production, institutions, seeds, and land and water management for emergency-related issues are: (i) strengthened team work and greater FAO effectiveness based on a forward-looking corporate vision of FAO's role in emergencies and a comprehensive framework for food and nutrition security analysis and needs assessments; (ii)improved quality and strengthened interdisciplinary nature of emergency needs assessments and response planning; (iii) enhanced FAO capacity to respond to disasters; (iv) strengthened national and local disaster risk management systems.

Indicators

  • Integrated support for enhanced capacities for preparedness, impact mitigation and emergency responses in crisis situation
    • Use of delivered products by FAO staff in the field

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • Significant progress was made in integrating technical inputs and work on emergency-related issues into a conceptual and operational framework in the context of disaster risk management (DRM). Work completed under this programme entity (PE) helped improve the interdisciplinary approach to emergency preparedness and response, strengthening linkages between technical units and emergency operations. Most concrete achievements related to this PE in 2006-07 involved the development and dissemination of multidisciplinary technical guidance and toolkits on DRM-related topics, such as climate change adaptation, DRM systems analysis and FAO effectiveness in emergencies. Specific examples include: development of the "Disaster Risk Management Systems Analysis Guide"; development of a jointly developed and managed Web site linking emergencies and DRM issues; Good Practice Sheets for field technicians on DRM in the context of agriculture and climate change adaptation; "Livestock Emergency Guidelines" (LEGS), in the context of DRM and pastoralist communities; a handbook on "FAO Effectiveness in Emergencies", supplemented by training events with FAO emergency units in the field and headquarters in Asia, Africa and Latin America; and substantial technical contributions to the development of the "Rapid Livelihoods Assessment Guide" (now broadened into a "Livelihoods Assessment Toolkit" [LAT], an evolving approach that has mainstreamed livelihoods into FAO emergency response in Bolivia, Indonesia, Pakistan and Uganda).

Programme 4E: Technical Cooperation Programme

Regular Programme   (USD 000)  
  Net Appropriation 103,550  
  Actual Income (0)  
  Adjusted Programme of Work 103,550  
  Expenditure at budget rate 100,581  
  Variance of expenditure (Over)/Under 2,969  
Extra budgetary Support to the Regular Programme   0  
Field Programme  
  Extra budgetary Support to Field Programme/Assistance to Member Countries 0  
  Extra budgetary funded Emergencies 0  
  TCP and SPFS delivery 0  
  Total Field Programme delivery 0  
Total Expenditure   100,581  


Type of Output Approved in PWB Cancelled/ Postponed Unplanned Delivered Total Delivered Delivered Unmodified Delivered Modified Percent Delivered
Provision of services to staff, departments and members 1 0 0 1 1 0 100%
Technical advice to Members and field programme support 2 0 0 2 2 0 100%
Total 3 0 0 3 3 0 100%


Programme Entity Title Type Lead Division
4ES01 Programme Management, Monitoring and Coordination of the TCP Support Services to Members and Other Partners TCO


Expected Benefits

  • Timely formulation and implementation of projects, and more generally use of the TCP Appropriation in conformity with the directives of Governing Bodies.

Indicators

  • Support to Project Formulation
    • Positive feedback reflecting recipient governments' satisfaction
  • Monitoring of Project Implementation
    • Number of budget revisions approved
  • Programme overall management
    • Positive feedback reflecting user satisfaction

Achievements, Success Stories and Lessons Learnt

  • This programme entity funded activities related to project formulation and approval, in particular the appraisal of project requests against the TCP criteria. Support to project implementation, including project and budget revisions required to achieve established objectives and expected outputs, was also provided. The management of the TCP was seriously affected by the liquidity problems faced by the Organization during the biennium. As a consequence, most projects approved in the second half of 2006 and the first half of 2007 could not be implemented immediately, leading to a reduction in the number of requests received for TCP. Consequently, it was not possible to commit the entire appropriation within the biennium. However, given that the appropriation for the TCP remains available for obligations during the financial period following that during which the funds were voted or transferred, the approval of projects against the 2006-07 appropriation will continue in 2008 until it is fully committed. In addition, new guidelines and procedures have been released on the following issues: procedures for the revision of TCP projects, reflecting the increased levels of flexibility for budget holders and a simplified process for approval (April 2006); TCP Facility Guidelines, reflecting the increased authority and responsibility of FAO Representatives for TCP resources up to US$200 000 (May 2006); Technical Cooperation Programme Guidelines, reflecting the decisions of FAO Governing Bodies in 2005, in particular related to country eligibility and the new criteria for TCP assistance (July 2006); TCP Guidelines for National Stakeholders (July 2007); and the TCP Standard Project Document Format, based on the FAO new Standard Project Document Format. Training and information sessions were provided to decentralized FAO staff on the rules governing the TCP and on the formulation of good quality project proposals.

CUBATable of ContentsTable of ContentsProgramme Entity 2KP01 Output Status