C 2013/Report

Introduction

McDougall Memorial Lecture[1]

1.                  Professor Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate for Economic Sciences, Professor of Economics and Philosophy, Harvard University, United States of America and former Master, Trinity College, Cambridge, United Kingdom, delivered the 28th McDougall Memorial Lecture in memory of Frank Lidgett McDougall, a founding father of the Organization.

Presentation of the B.R. Sen Awards[2]

2.                  The B.R. Sen Award 2011 was conferred jointly on Mr David Doolan (Ireland) for his contribution to the development of the FAO programme in Pakistan while serving as International Project Manager and to Mr Patrick Durst (USA) for his contributions to forests and forestry while serving as Senior Forestry Officer in the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

3.                  The B.R. Sen Award 2012 was conferred on Mr Luca Alinovi (Italy) for his contribution to the Somalia Programme while serving as Senior Emergency and Rehabilitation Coordinator and Officer‑in‑Charge, FAO, Somalia.

Presentation of the A.H. Boerma Award[3]

4.                  The A.H. Boerma Award 2012-2013 was conferred on Ms Lucy Lamble of The Guardian – Development (United Kingdom) in recognition of the editorial team’s significant contribution to improving world-wide understanding of development issues, particularly agriculture, food security and poverty, with emphasis on progress made towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

Presentation of the Edouard Saouma Award[4]

5.                  The Edouard Saouma Award 2012-2013 was conferred on Mr David K. Mbugua and Mr Peter N. Kirigua of the Kenya Forest Service for their implementation of “The sustainable livelihood development project in the Mau forest complex”.

Presentation of the Jacques Diouf Award[5]

6.                  The Jacques Diouf Award 2012-2013 was conferred jointly on the Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA), India, for improving the food security of poor self-employed women and their families, and the European Commission for the implementation of the European Union Food Facility.

Presentation of the Margarita Lizárraga Medal[6]

7.                  The Margarita Lizárraga Medal for 2012-2013 was awarded to the Organización del Sector Pesquero y Acuícola del Istmo Centroamericano (OSPESCA) in El Salvador in recognition of its significant contribution to sustainable fisheries and aquaculture development in Central American countries through the promotion of implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in its Member countries.

Statement by a Representative of the FAO Staff Bodies[7]

8.                  The President of the Association of Professional Staff in FAO made a statement on behalf of the two FAO Staff Representative Bodies.

In Memoriam[8]

9.                  The Conference observed one minute of silence in memory of those staff members who had died since the Conference last met. The names of the deceased staff members were read aloud and are contained in the Verbatim Records of the Conference.

Election of the Chairperson and Vice-Chairpersons[9]

10.              The Council nominated and the Conference elected Mr Mohammad Asif Rahimi (Afghanistan) as Chairperson of the 38th Session of the Conference.

11.              The Council nominated and the Conference elected the three Vice-Chairpersons of the Conference: Mr Kouassi Adjoumani Kobenan (Côte d’Ivoire), Mr Thomas Wriessnig (Germany) and Mr Mahinda Yapa Abeywardena (Sri Lanka).

Appointment of the General Committee and Credentials Committee[10]

12.              The Council recommended and the Conference elected the:

Seven members of the General Committee

Costa Rica

Sudan

New Zealand

United States of America

Slovakia

Zimbabwe

Sri Lanka

 

 

Nine members of the Credentials Committee

Algeria

Honduras

Canada

Hungary

China

New Zealand

Colombia

Oman

Czech Republic

 

Adoption of the Agenda and Arrangements for the Session[11]

13.              The Conference adopted its Agenda as given in Appendix A to this Report.

14.              The Conference adopted the arrangements proposed by the 145th Session of Council and the timetable proposed by the 146th Session of Council, and as amended by the General Committee.

Establishment of Commissions and Appointment of their Chairpersons,
Vice-Chairpersons and Drafting Committees

15.              The Conference concurred with the Council's recommendations to establish two Commissions.

16.              In accordance with Rule VII and Rule XXIV-5 (b) of the General Rules of the Organization (GRO), the 146th Session of the Council nominated Ms Nomatemba Tambo (South Africa) as Chairperson of Commission I and Ms Gerda Verburg (Netherlands) as Chairperson of Commission II, which the Conference approved.

17.              Ms Lorena Noemi Patiño (Paraguay) was elected Chairperson of the Drafting Committee for Commission I with the following membership: Angola, Argentina, Bangladesh, Canada, France, Indonesia, Mali, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Paraguay, Sudan and Turkey.

18.              Ms Hedwig Wögerbauer (Austria) was elected Chairperson of the Drafting Committee for Commission II with the following membership: Afghanistan, Australia, Austria, Brazil, China, Congo, Ecuador, Germany, Japan, Ireland, Russian Federation, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America and Yemen.

19.              The Conference appointed the foregoing officers and, taking into consideration the proposals of the General Committee, in accordance with Rule X-2(c) of the GRO, also appointed the following Vice-Chairpersons:


Commission I

Mr François Pythoud (Switzerland)

 

Ms Gladys Francisca Urbaneja Durán (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

Commission II

Mr Claudio Miscia (Italy)

 

Ms Carla Elisa Mucavi (Mozambique)

Resolutions Committee of the Conference

20.              The Conference endorsed the recommendation of the 146th Session of the Council to establish a Resolutions Committee of seven Members, one from each Region, and appointed:

 

Australia

Estonia

Bangladesh

Iraq

Canada

Uruguay

Equatorial Guinea

 

Right of Reply

21.              The Conference confirmed the decision taken at its previous sessions to the effect that, when a Member wished to reply to criticisms of its Government's policy, it should preferably do so on the day on which such criticism had been voiced after all those wishing to participate in the discussion had had an opportunity to speak.

Verification of Credentials

22.              The Credentials Committee held four meetings on 7, 14, 15 and 19 June 2013 to examine the credentials received for this session of the Conference. A report was issued as document C 2013/LIM/23 Rev.1, with 106 Members listed in List A and 74 Members listed in List B. One Member informed the Director‑General of its intention not to attend the Conference.

23.              The lists reflect the situation as at 19 June 2013.

24.              The credentials of the representatives of the United Nations, its Specialized Agencies and related organizations were duly deposited as prescribed under Rule III-2 of the GRO.

Voting Rights

25.              The Conference noted that, in accordance with Article III.4 of the Constitution, at the beginning of the Session 14 Member Nations (Antigua and Barbuda, Comoros, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Niger, Palau, Sao Tome and Principe, Somalia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan) had lost their voting rights in the Conference, since the amount of their arrears of contributions to the Organization exceeded the amount due for the two preceding years.

26.              Subsequently, two Member Nations (Djibouti and Niger) made payments sufficient to regain their voting rights.

27.              The Conference decided to restore the voting rights to the Dominican Republic, Somalia and Tajikistan, which had requested special consideration under Article III.4 of the Constitution.

28.              The Conference accepted the request by Comoros and Liberia to repay their arrears through instalment plans and therefore decided to restore their voting rights. To this effect, the Conference adopted the following Resolutions:

Resolution 1/2013
Payment of Contributions - Comoros

THE CONFERENCE,

Noting that the Government of Comoros had made a proposal that it liquidate its arrears of contributions over a period of four years commencing in 2014 in addition to paying each current contribution in the calendar year of assessment,

Decides that:

a)        Notwithstanding Financial Regulation 5.5 the arrears of contributions of Comoros totalling USD 258,584.29 shall be settled through the payment of four annual instalments of USD 64,646.07 each from 2014 to 2017.

b)        The first instalment shall be payable on 1 January 2014.

c)        The annual payment of the instalments referred to above, together with the payment of each current contribution in the calendar year of assessment and any advances to the Working Capital Fund, shall be considered as fulfilment of the financial obligations of Comoros to the Organization.

d)        Instalments shall be payable in accordance with Financial Regulation 5.5.

e)        Default in payment of two instalments shall render this instalment plan null and void.

 

(Adopted 22 June 2013)

Resolution 2/2013
Payment of Contributions - Liberia

THE CONFERENCE,

Noting that the Government of Liberia had made a proposal that it liquidate its arrears of contributions over a period of ten years commencing in 2014 in addition to paying each current contribution in the calendar year of assessment,

Decides that:

a)        Notwithstanding Financial Regulation 5.5 the arrears of contributions of Liberia totalling USD 121,619.85 and EUR 14,733.60 shall be settled through the payment of ten annual instalments of USD 12,161.98 and EUR 1,473.36 each from 2014 to 2023.

b)        The first instalment shall be payable on 1 January 2014.

c)        The annual payment of the instalments referred to above, together with the payment of each current contribution in the calendar year of assessment and any advances to the Working Capital Fund, shall be considered as fulfilment of the financial obligations of Liberia to the Organization.

d)        Instalments shall be payable in accordance with Financial Regulation 5.5.

e)        Default in payment of two instalments shall render this instalment plan null and void.

 

 (Adopted 22 June 2013)

29.              The Conference recalled the recommendation of the Conference in 2005 and of the Finance Committee in March 2013 that future requests for restoration of voting rights be referred to the Director-General for submission to the Spring Session of the Finance Committee in Conference years. The Conference requested the CCLM to examine the legal aspects of implementation of the proposal, including whether changes to the Basic Texts of the Organization were required.

30.              The Conference noted that seven Member Nations which had not written a letter requesting special consideration (Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Guinea-Bissau, Palau, Sao Tome and Principe, Turkmenistan) had effectively lost their voting rights.

Admission of Observers[12]

Intergovernmental Organizations and International Non-Governmental Organizations

31.              The Conference reviewed the list of intergovernmental organizations and international non‑governmental organizations to which the Director-General had extended a provisional invitation to the Session, and confirmed them.

Palestine

32.              The Conference confirmed the invitation issued by the Director-General to Palestine, at the suggestion of the 146th Session of the Council.

Substantive and Policy Matters

Review of the State of Food and Agriculture[13]

33.              One hundred and twelve Heads of Delegation and four Observers intervened on this agenda item, commenting on the agricultural and food security situation at the global level and in their respective countries, with a focus on the theme of the General Debate: “Sustainable Food Systems for Food Security and Nutrition”.

34.              The Conference noted the persistence of high levels of undernourishment in spite of progress towards the hunger reduction target of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 1 in many parts of the developing world. The Conference also noted that high and volatile international food commodity prices continued to pose a serious threat to food security and welcomed the work of the Agricultural Market Information System towards greater market transparency and price stability in domestic and international markets. The Conference encouraged countries and the international community to step up efforts towards increasing sustainable agricultural productivity, especially in smallholder farming.

35.              The Conference noted the persistence of undernourishment, undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies and the emergence of overweight and obesity in many parts of the world. The Conference recognized the potential of food systems to become both more sustainable and more supportive of good nutritional outcomes and the need for a multi-sectoral approach that included agriculture and food systems, health, sanitation, social protection, employment and education.

Regional Conferences

Regional and Global Policy and Regulatory Matters arising from:[14]

Report of the 31st Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific (APRC)
(Hanoi, Viet Nam, 12-16 March 2012)
[15]

36.              The Conference endorsed the report and took note of the recommendations presented therein. It also thanked Viet Nam for the excellent organization of the Regional Conference and looked forward to seeing items related to the South-West Pacific Island States on the agenda of the next Regional Conference.

Report of the 32nd Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean (LARC)
(Buenos Aires, Argentina, 26-30 March 2012)
[16]

37.              The Conference endorsed the report and took note of the recommendations presented therein. It expressed its gratitude to Argentina, the host Country, for the excellent organization of the Regional Conference.

Report of the 28th Regional Conference for Europe (ERC)
(Baku, Azerbaijan, 17-20 April 2012)
[17]

38.              The Conference endorsed the report and took note of the recommendations presented therein. It expressed its gratitude to Azerbaijan for the excellent organization of the Regional Conference.

Report of the 27th Regional Conference for Africa (ARC)
(Brazzaville, Congo, 23-27 April 2012)
[18]

39.              The Conference endorsed the report and took note of the recommendations presented therein. It expressed its gratitude to Congo for the excellent organization of the Regional Conference.

Report of the 31st Regional Conference for the Near East (NERC)
(Rome, Italy, 14-18 May 2012)
[19]

40.              The Conference endorsed the report and took note of the recommendations presented therein. Appreciation was expressed for the manner in which Iraq had chaired the Regional Conference.

Input from the Informal Regional Conference for North America
(Ottawa, Canada, 3-5 April 2012)
[20]

41.              The Conference also took note of the practice of the North America Region to host an Informal Regional Conference allowing Member Nations of the Region to make inputs into the Organization’s prioritization process without, for reasons of cost-effectiveness, establishing an official Regional Conference for the North America Region at this point in time.

Technical Committees

Global Policy and Regulatory Matters arising from:

Report of the 23rd Session of the Committee on Agriculture (21-25 May 2012)[21]

42.              The Conference endorsed the Report of the 23rd Session of the Committee on Agriculture (COAG).

43.              The Conference:

a)         noted the analysis of the Global Trends and future Challenges for the Work of the Organization;

b)        supported the Global Agenda of Action in Support of Sustainable Livestock Sector Development as a multi-stakeholder initiative; invited Member Nations to broadly participate in this initiative; stressed the need for concrete results in the field; further recommended that FAO continue its central engagement, act as its Secretary; and requested that a governance system for this initiative be elaborated, in line with the FAO strategies on partnership with the private sector and civil society, and defining its relationship to COAG, to be presented at the Session of COAG in 2014;

c)         supported FAO’s work on sustainable crop production intensification and further recommended its integration with nutrition, seeds, adequate diets, food losses and waste, efficient use of water, conservation and use of genetic resources that resulted in synergized impact to crop productivity;

d)        invited FAO to continue work on natural resources management, food safety and transboundary pests, including locust, with an emphasis on developing preventive control;

e)         highlighted the importance of sustainable agricultural development, including the development of measures to protect Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS);

f)         supported the Global Soil Partnership and looked forward to active participation in this initiative; and

g)         supported the Action Plan for improving statistics.

Report of the 69th Session of the Committee on Commodity Problems (28-30 May 2012)[22]

44.              The Conference endorsed the report of the 69th Session of the Committee on Commodity Problems (CCP).

45.              The Conference:

a)         recognized the importance of improved market access to commodities from developing countries as a way to enhance food security and income generating objectives of these countries;

b)        recognized the importance and need for timely and reliable information on commodity markets and for analytical studies as a measure to enhance market transparency and reduce excessive price volatility;

c)         stressed the importance of FAO in promoting the availability of national data on commodity markets and the need for capacity building at country level to improve the timeliness, quality of the data and information analysis;

d)        supported FAO’s collaboration with other international organizations, including the World Trade Organization (WTO), in delivering technical assistance programmes and in conducting studies on markets and trade policy issues and their implications for food security, including those addressed in the Doha Round mandate; and welcomed the collaboration with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and Members, on which the medium-term agricultural outlook work was

based; and

e)         noted the high importance of reaching a comprehensive and balanced conclusion of the Doha Development Round of trade negotiations given its potential contribution to agriculture and creating an enabling environment for development and food security, and to responding to excessive price volatility.

46.              The Conference further noted:

a)         the information regarding the resolution adopted by ten tea producing countries in February 2012 in Colombo (Sri Lanka) on the occasion of the Intergovernmental Group on Tea to establish an International Tea Producers Forum; and

b)        the special event hosted by the CCP on “FAO-Cooperatives Meeting: Working Together for the 2012 International Year of Cooperatives” and the nomination of two Special Ambassadors for Cooperatives during this event. 

Report of the 30th Session of the Committee on Fisheries (9-13 July 2012)[23]

47.              The Conference reviewed and endorsed the Report of the 30th Session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI), and took note of specific comments made by Member Nations.

48.              The Conference expressed general support for the work of FAO on fisheries and aquaculture, in particular with regard to the role of fisheries and aquaculture for food security and nutrition, ocean governance, marine diversity protection, combating Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing, including improvement of traceability and development of a global record of fishing vessels, port State measures and flag State performance, small-scale fisheries, aquaculture, data collection and capacity development, particularly in developing countries in the South-South Cooperation Framework.

49.              The Conference recognized the importance of fish as a source of food, nutrition and means of livelihoods. The Conference also noted the need to continue working on the outcomes of Rio+20 at future COFI meetings.

50.              The Conference requested FAO to seek a concrete and clear solution regarding capacity development to be arranged through the next session of COFI in order to support developing countries in successfully implementing fishery Official Development Assistance (ODA) programmes.

Report of the 21st Session of the Committee on Forestry (24-28 September 2012)[24]

51.              The Conference endorsed the Report of the 21st Session of the Committee on Forestry (COFO).

52.              The Conference:

a)         invited Members to emphasize and promote the contribution of forests to the green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication;

b)        invited countries to strengthen dialogue and cooperation between forestry and other land use sectors at all levels in order to enhance effectiveness in achieving development goals and fulfilling international commitments;

c)         recommended that countries develop suitable strategies and actions for sustained financing for Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) and strengthen regional and international cooperation in this area;

d)        invited countries to integrate fire management into national, rural land and forest management policies; and

e)         noted the results of the Strategic Thinking Process and urged that the role of forestry be duly reflected in the implementation of the Strategic Objectives.

53.              The Conference:

a)         noted the International Conference on Forests and Food Security, as well as the Forest and Farm Facility, as important vehicles of cross-sectoral collaboration and invited FAO to continue supporting synergies within and outside the forest sector, including through a proactive role in the Collaborative Partnership on Forests, integration of forest issues into key environmental and land-use policies at all levels and closer cooperation in the area of forestry, agriculture and fisheries;

b)        stressed the need to consider boreal forests for their contribution to providing multiple goods and a wide range of ecosystem services; and

c)         suggested the allocation of adequate resources for the Forestry programme reflecting the important role of forests in FAO’s mandate.

Reports of the 37th (17-22 October 2011), 38th (Special) (11 May 2012) and
39th (15-20 October 2012) Sessions of the Committee on World Food Security
[25]

54.              The Conference welcomed the progress made by the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) as the foremost inclusive international and intergovernmental platform for all stakeholders to work together in a coordinated way to ensure food security and nutrition for all and endorsed the Reports of the 37th, 38th (Special) and 39th Sessions of the Committee.

 

55.              The Conference noted the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (VGGT) and the Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition (GSF) and underlined that these represented two major achievements of the reformed CFS. The Conference encouraged Members to implement voluntarily the guidelines in their national policies with support from FAO and relevant organizations as appropriate.

56.              The Conference called on Members as well as the Rome-based Agencies to disseminate major CFS outputs at regional and national level.

57.              The Conference acknowledged the work of the Committee to develop principles for responsible agriculture investment and an Agenda for Action for addressing Food Insecurity in Protracted Crises processes and emphasized the need to support these negotiation processes.

58.              The Conference recognized the work undertaken by the CFS joint Secretariat and noted the importance of ensuring that adequate resources be allocated to support the activities of the Committee, including support to the joint Secretariat.

Other Substantive and Policy Matters

FAO Policy on Gender Equality and the UN System-wide
Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (SWAP)
[26]

59.              The Conference acknowledged FAO’s attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment at all levels.

60.              Member Nations unanimously adopted the FAO Policy on Gender Equality and welcomed the Organization’s ambition to become a model agency on gender equality.

61.              The Conference congratulated the Director-General on placing highly qualified women in senior management positions and encouraged further steps towards gender equality.

62.              The Conference encouraged the Secretariat to fully implement the UN/SWAP Action Plan.

63.              Member Nations supported FAO’s strategy for addressing gender equality in its work and expressed concern about the visibility and prioritization of gender work. Member Nations noted the change in treating gender as a dedicated strategic objective to a cross-cutting theme and, while the change was welcomed, it was also noted that it would require vigilance and funding.

64.              The Conference requested the Organization to:

a)         inform Member Nations of the status of establishment of an oversight committee, as recommended in the Policy;

b)        ensure capacity development on gender equality was provided to all staff, including senior management and decentralized offices, as well as to stakeholders in Member Nations;

c)         ensure adequate resource allocation (time, budget) for gender work and support to the network of focal points;

d)        ensure gender specific targets, baselines and indicators were included in the reviewed Strategic Framework and MTP;

e)         give importance to collection and analysis of gender disaggregated data and ensure that related capacity support was provided to Member Nations and units within FAO;

f)         carry out analysis of gaps in terms of gender needs by all units in FAO; and

g)         use a gender marker system to track resources allocated to gender.

65.              The Conference stressed that strong messages on gender equality be disseminated regularly to staff and Member Nations.

66.              Member Nations requested that gender work be appropriately resourced and continued funding be maintained at the minimum level (as per Conference 2011) of USD 21.8 million (2.1 percent of FAO’s overall budget) in the coming biennium.

67.              Member Nations welcomed the target set by the Policy that the Technical Cooperation Programme’s (TCP) portfolio allocate 30 percent of programmes and projects to gender equality.

68.              The Conference requested FAO to publish reports on implementation of the Policy and of UN/SWAP standards, and report regularly to Conference. These reports should include reporting on the specific targets set out in the policy and the UN/SWAP framework.

69.              Member Nations stressed they were ready to support FAO in achieving UN/SWAP performance standards.

70.              The Conference encouraged the Secretariat to strengthen partnerships with the World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment.

71.              The Conference highlighted the need to have a strong united gender unit to implement the FAO Policy on Gender Equality and mainstream gender in all strategic objectives.

Interim Report on the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review of Operational Activities for Development of the United Nations System[27]

72.              The Conference reviewed the Interim Report and took note of FAO’s progress in the implementation of the UN General Assembly cumulative resolutions on the Triennial and Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review (TCPR and QCPR) of operational activities. It expressed appreciation to the Secretariat for the quality and depth of the report.

73.              The Conference:

a)         noted FAO’s consistent commitment and active participation in the implementation of the TCPR/QCPR;

b)        encouraged FAO to continue supporting increased UN System-wide coherence, by inter alia seeking full integration of its Country Programming Frameworks into the UN Development Assistance Frameworks;

c)         expressed support to the “Delivering as One” model as one of the main models for UN coordination at the country level, as mentioned in paragraph 252 of the FAO Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014-15[28];

d)        underlined the importance of the Resident Coordinator System for achieving UN System‑wide coherence, while noting also the need to respect the peculiarities of all UN agencies’ mandates; and

e)         took note of the cost‑sharing agreement amongst the members of the United Nations Development Group of 4 April 2013 and requested FAO to implement the agreement, in line with the provisions of the 2012 QCPR on the need to provide financial, technical and organizational support for the Resident Coordinator System.

74.              The Conference:

a)         requested another progress report on the TCPR/QCPR at the next regular session of the FAO Conference; and

b)        requested the Secretariat to prepare a report on the steps taken in relation to the implementation of the agreement of 4 April 2013.

 

United Nations/FAO World Food Programme[29]

75.              The Conference:

a)         endorsed the World Food Programme (WFP) Annual Reports to ECOSOC and FAO for 2011 and 2012;

b)        commended WFP on its efforts to address the emergency food assistance needs of the most vulnerable populations affected by humanitarian crises, particularly in Syria, the Sahel and the Horn of Africa;

c)         welcomed the new WFP Strategic Plan which identified emergency and humanitarian assistance as its core strengths;

d)        commended WFP for the intensification of Rome-based collaboration particularly through Rio+20, the post-2015 process and through Purchase for Progress (P4P) and resilience activities at country-level;

e)         encouraged WFP to continue its active involvement in CFS discussions such as the Agenda for Action on Food Insecurity and Protracted Crises, on social protection issues and responsible agricultural investment; and

f)         welcomed WFP’s consolidation from food aid to food assistance noting that the set of innovative tools had been broadened.

Report of the 14th Regular Session of the
Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (15-19 April 2013)
[30]

76.              The Conference welcomed and adopted the Report of the 14th Regular Session of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (CGRFA–14/13/Report) with an amendment in footnote 25 to read CGRFA–14/13/Inf.16 Rev.1 instead of CGRFA‑14/13/Inf.16.

77.              The Conference adopted the Global Plan of Action for the Conservation, Sustainable Use and Development of Forest Genetic Resources.

78.              The Conference noted the complementarity between the work of the Commission and the Nagoya Protocol in regards to Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) for Genetic Resources.

International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides[31]

79.              The Conference noted the inclusive and comprehensive nature of the review of the International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides that had been undertaken and would be carried out, and adopted the following resolution:

Resolution 3/2013
International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling the adoption of the voluntary International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides by the FAO Conference at its Twenty-third Session in 1985 through resolution 10/85;

Recalling the adoption of the amendments to the Code by the FAO Conference at its Twenty-fifth Session in 1989 to introduce provisions for Prior Informed Consent (PIC) into Articles 2 and 9 through Resolution 6/89;

Recalling the adoption of the amendments to the Code by the FAO Council at its Hundred and Twenty-third Session in 2002, based on the authority given by the FAO Conference at its Thirty-first Session, to reflect the adoption of the Rotterdam Convention and to include a number of new pest and pesticide management concepts;

Noting that the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) have long collaborated in the development and implementation of the Code and have expressed an interest in having the Code officially adopted by their own Governing Bodies;

Acknowledging that it is important to maintain the Code up to date and aligned with developments in the fields of chemicals and pesticide management and that a number of amendments are currently required to strengthen the way in which the Code addresses the health and environment sectors;

Recognizing that the Code was presented to the FAO Committee on Agriculture (COAG) at its Twenty-third Session (May 2012) and that COAG had delegated its Bureau to determine the modalities for a final round of consultations among FAO Members with a view to submit the finalized Code for adoption by the FAO Governing Bodies, including the 145th Session of Council and the 38th Session of Conference;

Noting that the COAG Bureau approved a roadmap and a timetable for that purpose and that full consultation among all FAO Members and stakeholders had been carried out, including through a joint meeting of the COAG Bureau and the FAO/WHO Joint Meeting on Pesticide Management where the Code was further reviewed:

1.     Notes the inclusive and comprehensive nature of the review process that has been undertaken;

2.     Welcomes the proposed adoption of the revised Code by the Governing Bodies of WHO and UNEP;

3.     Notes the relevance of effective life cycle management of pesticides to sustainable intensification of crop production;

4.     Adopts the International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management as set out in Appendix C;

5.     Calls upon all Members to adopt and civil society and private sector organizations to implement the updated Code and use it as a reference in all their activities.

 

 (Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Preparations for the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2)[32]

80.              The Conference:

a)         fully supported FAO and WHO’s joint initiative to organize the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2);

b)        welcomed the document summarizing ongoing preparations and plans for the ICN2;

c)         appreciated FAO’s renewed focus on nutrition and that the ICN2 would keep nutrition high on the international development agenda;

d)        concurred with the analysis of nutrition trends since 1992 and supported the comprehensive, multi-disciplinary approach and the broad and inclusive global perspective adopted by the ICN2;

e)         considered it appropriate to focus the ICN2 on nutrition challenges faced by the poorest and most nutritionally vulnerable households, especially by women and children from such households; on undernutrition (stunting, wasting and micronutrient deficiencies) while recognizing the nutrition transition and the rapid spread of non-communicable diseases;

f)         called for the ICN2 to build on the latest information available on nutrition, to further engage with relevant international organizations, build upon international initiatives and processes including the CFS and others, and to further develop partnerships with Civil Society Organizations (CSO) and the private sector; and

g)         recommended identifying results‑oriented responses including affordable solutions for improving access to, and consumption of, food through improvements and diversification in agriculture, fisheries and other food systems with support from other sectors.

81.              The Conference:

a)         agreed to holding the Preparatory Technical Meeting from 13 to 15 November 2013 at FAO headquarters with a view to identifying themes around which the high‑level ICN2 Conference in Rome would be organized from 19 to 21 November 2014; and

b)        expected high participation in the high level Conference in November 2014 and encouraged all countries to ensure effective national level preparations, not only involving agriculture and health, but all those who should be mobilized to improve nutrition.

International Years and Days

Evaluation of the International Year of Forests 2011[33]

82.              The Conference:

a)         endorsed the Report on the Evaluation of the International Year of Forests 2011;

b)        recognized the achievements of the International Year in raising public awareness of the contribution of forests to sustainable development; and further recognized the active involvement of Member Nations and the contribution of FAO in supporting and coordinating activities, including within the Collaborative Partnership on Forests; and

c)         noted with appreciation the proclamation of 21 March as the International Day of Forests and requested FAO to facilitate the implementation of the International Day as stipulated in General Assembly (GA) Resolution A/67/200.

International Year of Cooperatives 2012[34]

83.              The Conference recommended the continuation of FAO’s work on policies and legal frameworks that empower and strengthen cooperatives and leverage their potential for eliminating hunger and reducing rural poverty.

84.              The Conference noted the positive outcome of the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) with regards to the promotion of agricultural and food cooperatives.

85.              The Conference requested the Organization to build on the efforts of the International Year of Cooperatives 2012 (IYC) and the International Year of Family Farming 2014 (IYFF) so that activities were interlinked and contributed to a coherent approach.

International Year of Quinoa 2013[35]

86.              The Conference:

a)         acknowledged and welcomed the progress report on the International Year of Quinoa (IYQ) 2013;

b)        noted with appreciation the actions taken by Member Nations in support of the IYQ;

c)         praised FAO for supporting the implementation of international years and appreciated the evaluation work it had carried out to ensure that resources invested in their implementation were used efficiently;

d)        stressed the challenges underlined in the Quinoa progress report with regard to mobilizing appropriate resources for the implementation of the IYQ; and

e)         encouraged Member Nations to provide extrabudgetary resources to support the implementation of the IYQ.

International Year of Family Farming 2014[36]

87.              The Conference expressed support for the International Year of Family Farming 2014 (IYFF) recognizing its contribution to global food security.

88.              The Conference noted the offer of the Government of the Philippines to host a closing ceremony for IYFF in December 2014, contingent on agreement among Members and availability of funds; and acknowledged the formation of IYFF national committees.

89.              The Conference appreciated FAO’s role in facilitating and coordinating activities, in collaboration with other international organizations and relevant stakeholders. 

World Soil Day[37]

90.              The Conference considered the proposal endorsed by the Council at its 145th Session to observe 5 December as World Soil Day to raise awareness of the importance of soils for food security, essential eco-system functions and sustainable development and adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 4/2013
World Soil Day

THE CONFERENCE,

Noting the importance of soil as a critical component of food security and ecosystems health and as a vital contributor to human wellbeing through its contribution to food, water and energy security and in mitigating biodiversity loss and climate change;

Recognizing that soil degradation is an alarming process that threatens global soil resources and therefore risks to compromise the achievement of sustainable development including the Millennium Development Goals, hunger eradication and poverty reduction;

Affirming that soils are clearly the key to addressing the current and future pressures of a growing population and that recognition, advocacy and support for promoting sustainable management of soils is the only alternative to ensure that the international community is able in the future to guarantee healthy soils for a food secure world based on stable and sustainable ecosystems;

Recalling the urgent need to raise awareness and to promote and facilitate actions towards sustainable management of soils, in order to reach the agreed sustainable development goals of a zero-hunger and land-degradation neutral world as stated at the Rio+20 Conference;

Affirming the urgent need of raising public awareness on the importance of soils for food security and ecosystem functions:

Requests the Director-General to transmit this Resolution to the Secretary-General of the United Nations with a view to having the General Assembly of the United Nations consider declaring 5 December as the World Soil Day at its next session.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

International Year of Soils[38]

91.              The Conference considered the proposal endorsed by the Council at its 146th Session to declare 2015 the International Year of Soils to raise awareness of the importance of soils for food security and nutrition and essential eco-system functions and adopted the following Resolution:


 

Resolution 5/2013
International Year of Soils

THE CONFERENCE,

Noting that soils constitute the foundation for all agricultural development, ecosystem functions, food security and are the key to sustaining life on Earth;

Recognizing that the sustainable intensification of agriculture to feed the growing population by 2050 will depend increasingly on healthy and fertile soils across the world; 

Affirming that soils are clearly key to addressing the pressures of a growing population and that recognition, advocacy and support for promoting sustainable management of soils is the way ahead if the international community is to guarantee healthy soils for a food secure world based on stable and sustainable ecosystems. 

Recognizing that soils constitute a fragile foundation and that soil degradation is a far-reaching long-term process which threatens global soil resources and therefore compromises actions in favour of climate change adaptation and efforts to reduce hunger, malnutrition and poverty; 

Recalling the urgent need to raise awareness and to promote and facilitate actions towards the sustainable management of soils in order to contribute to the agreed sustainable development goals of a zero-hunger and land-degradation neutral world as stated at the Rio+20 Conference; 

Trusting that such a celebration would establish a platform and will encourage actions to promote and implement activities in favour of the sustainable management of global soil resources.

Affirming the urgent need of raising public awareness of the importance of soils for food security and ecosystem functions;

Requests the Director-General to transmit this Resolution to the Secretary-General of the United Nations with a view to having the General Assembly of the United Nations consider, at its next session, declaring 2015 as the International Year of Soils.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

International Year of Pulses[39]

92.              The Conference considered the proposal endorsed by the FAO Council at its 146th Session to declare 2016 the International Year of Pulses to raise awareness of the contribution of pulses to food security and nutrition and adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 6/2013
International Year of Pulses

THE CONFERENCE,

Noting that pulse crops such as lentils, beans, peas and chickpeas are a critical source of plant-based proteins for people around the globe;

Recalling that the World Food Programme and other food aid initiatives use pulses as a critical part of the general food basket;

Desiring to focus attention on the role that pulses play as part of sustainable food production aimed towards food security;

Recognizing that the properties of pulses make them an environmentally friendly food choice;

Recognizing health organizations around the world recommend eating pulses as part of a healthy diet to address obesity, as well as preventing and managing chronic diseases such as diabetes, coronary conditions and cancer;

Believing that such a celebration would create a unique opportunity to encourage connections throughout the food chain that will better utilize pulse-based proteins, further global production of pulses, better utilize crop rotations, and address the challenges of trade of pulses;

Affirming the need to heighten public awareness of the nutritional benefits of pulses, and further sustainable agriculture;

Requests the Director-General to transmit this Resolution to the Secretary-General of the United Nations with a view to having the General Assembly of the United Nations consider, at its next session, declaring 2016 as the International Year of Pulses.

 (Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Programme and Budgetary Matters

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11[40]

93.              The Conference:

a)         welcomed the Programme Implementation Report (PIR) 2010-11 and the biennial performance against pre-established targets;

b)        encouraged further efforts to achieve balanced geographical representation in FAO’s staff and to increase the percentage of women in professional posts, while stressing the primary consideration of merit in recruitment; and

c)         recommended that the next version of PIR continue to be enhanced in its presentation and content alongside its comprehensive annexes, and include the following improvements:

                                      i)      greater use of examples of achievements;

                                    ii)      reporting of regional dimensions aligned with Strategic Objectives;

                                  iii)      clearer reporting on performance against indicators;

                                  iv)      assessment of cross-cutting issues, including gender; and

                                    v)      more enhanced reporting in general.

Programme Evaluation Report 2013[41]

94.              The Conference appreciated the Programme Evaluation Report including the quantitative data, provided for the first time, on evaluations undertaken and the section drawing common lessons learned from evaluations undertaken. It encouraged more in-depth analysis of specific lessons learned and requested that the cost of strategic evaluations be included in future issues of the Programme Evaluation Report.

95.              The Conference stressed the importance of making budgetary provision within projects to permit evaluations to be carried out. The Conference appreciated the strengthening of collaboration with other Rome-based Agencies on evaluation matters.

Reviewed Strategic Framework[42]

96.              The Conference:

a)         appreciated the Strategic Thinking and Transformational Change processes from which the reviewed Strategic Framework was derived;

b)        endorsed the recommendation of the Council for strengthening of FAO’s Global Goal 1 to read: Eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition, progressively ensuring a world in which people at all times have sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life;

c)         recalled that the five Strategic Objectives represented the areas of work on which FAO will focus its efforts in support of Member Nations, and welcomed their cross-cutting nature which will enable the Organization to better work in a multidisciplinary and integrated manner;

d)        underlined the importance of the sixth objective for the technical quality, knowledge and services of FAO’s work and the provision of global public goods;

e)         stressed the need to integrate the cross-cutting themes of gender and governance across the Strategic Objectives;

f)         stressed the importance of partnerships, including with Civil Society Organizations and the Private Sector in implementation of the Reviewed Strategic Framework; and

g)         approved the Reviewed Strategic Framework, in particular FAO’s Vision, the revised Global Goals, the five new Strategic Objectives, as well as the sixth objective and the cross-cutting themes of gender and governance, which were integral to the achievement of the Strategic Objectives.

Medium Term Plan 2014-2017 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014-2015[43]

97.              The Conference considered the Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget (MTP/PWB) 2014-15, the observations and recommendations of the Council, and the additional information that had been made available by the Secretariat.

98.              The Conference noted that the proposals had been developed to implement the Reviewed Strategic Framework containing five new Strategic Objectives, the sixth objective on technical quality, knowledge and services, and the cross-cutting themes, in particular gender. The Conference welcomed the fact that the document had benefited from the Strategic Thinking and the Transformational Change processes launched in 2012.

99.              The Conference requested the Director-General to fulfil the undertakings on gender and to report to the Council at its 148th Session through the Programme and Finance Committees on how the mainstreaming of gender equality issues in all five Strategic Objectives had been operationalized in the action plans and results framework.

100.          The Conference expressed its support for the Director-General’s vision for the Organization and, in recognizing the challenges faced by Member Nations in the prevailing global economic and financial climate, stressed the need to fully implement the proposed Programme of Work in the most cost effective manner possible.

101.          In considering the substance of the proposed PWB 2014-15, the Conference appreciated the level of efficiency gains and savings achieved during the 2012-13 biennium while delivering the approved programme of work. The Conference requested the Director-General to put measures in place to achieve further efficiency gains and other savings in 2014-15, particularly staffing related costs. The Conference emphasized that these efficiency gains and savings should be driven by the goal of ensuring the most efficient and effective use of resources within a renewed FAO and not at the expense of the delivery of the Programme of Work.

102.          In order to establish the level of staff needed to deliver the Strategic Objectives, the Conference endorsed the Secretariat’s initiative for a strategic workforce planning exercise and job audit. The Conference requested the Secretariat to update Members on progress through the Finance Committee and Council at their next regular sessions.


 

103.          The Conference emphasized the importance of the following areas in the implementation of the Programme of Work:

a)         decentralization;

b)        gender;

c)         administrative streamlining and work prioritization; and

d)        the need to allow full managerial scope to the Director-General.

104.          The Conference requested that the Director-General’s adjustments to the PWB 2014-15 reflect the decisions and requests of the Conference, for consideration by the Programme and Finance Committees and approval by the Council at its 148th Session in December 2013.

105.          In relation to the PWB Information Note 10 regarding FAO’s comparative advantage in relation to social protection, the Conference requested that further information on the social protection activities of the Organization in implementing the PWB 2014-15 be provided to the Council.

106.          In stressing the importance of efforts to reduce increases in staff costs of the Organization, the Conference recognized that most of FAO staff benefits and entitlements were determined under the United Nations Common System and were approved by the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) and/or the United Nations General Assembly in New York. The Conference appealed to the ICSC and the General Assembly, and likewise urged the Director-General to make a similar appeal, to consider the need for greater vigilance with regard to increases in staff costs across the Common System, particularly within the context of the ongoing comprehensive review being undertaken by the ICSC.

107.          The Conference recognized that the 2012-13 approved net appropriation of USD 1,005.6 million included USD 8.6 million for one-time IPA investment costs. For future clarity in PWB discussions, the Conference requested the Director-General to clearly identify the budgetary treatment of one-time costs when establishing budgetary proposals.

108.          Concerning the longer-term financial health of the Organization, the Conference:

a)        noted that the Finance Committee would undertake a comprehensive review of proposals to improve FAO’s financial health, liquidity and reserves at its autumn session in 2013 for subsequent consideration by the Council;

b)        deferred to future biennia the replenishment of the Working Capital Fund and the Special Reserve Account, as well as the incremental funding of the Terminal Payments Fund past service liability; and

c)      for the 2014-15 biennium, agreed to continue the approach previously approved of partial funding of USD 14.1 million towards the After-Service Medical Coverage past service liability.

109.          The Conference noted that the Council had not been able to make a recommendation to the Conference regarding the level of the budget for 2014-15 and that Members had held informal discussions on the matter within a group of “Friends of the Chair” chaired by the Independent Chairperson of the Council. A group of “Friends of the Chair” of Commission II was subsequently formed to assist in reaching a consensus on the budget level for 2014-15. The Conference expressed appreciation for the additional information and support provided by the Secretariat during these discussions, as well as the spirit of cooperation among Members.  


 

110.          The Conference adopted the following resolution:

Resolution 7/2013
Budgetary Appropriations 2014-15

THE CONFERENCE,

Having considered the Director-General's Programme of Work and Budget;

Having considered the proposed total net appropriation of USD 1,028,100,000 for the financial period 2014-15 at the 2012-13 rate of Euro 1= USD 1.36 which assumes US dollar and Euro expenditure equal to USD 519,196,000 and Euros 374,194,000;

Having considered that the above net appropriation is equivalent to USD 1,005,648,000 at the budget rate of Euro 1 = USD 1.30 established for 2014-15 after translation of the Euro portion;

1)      Approves the Programme of Work proposed by the Director-General for 2014-15 as follows:

a)      Appropriations are voted at a rate of Euro 1 = USD 1.30 for the following purposes:

 

 

USD

Chapter 1:

Contribute to the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition

 95,023,000

Chapter 2:

Increase and improve provision of goods and services from agriculture, forestry and fisheries in a sustainable manner

197,559,000

Chapter 3:

Reduce rural poverty

66,018,000

Chapter 4:

Enable more inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems at local, national and international levels

113,390,000

Chapter 5:

Increase the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises

37,268,000

Chapter 6:

Technical Quality, Knowledge and Services

51,063,000

Chapter 7:

Technical Cooperation Programme

134,721,000

Chapter 8:

Outreach

 66,684,000

Chapter 9:

Information Technology

 44,007,000

Chapter 10:

FAO Governance, Oversight and Direction

 86,060,000

Chapter 11:

Efficient and Effective Administration

 89,399,000

Chapter 12:

Contingencies

600,000

Chapter 13:

Capital Expenditure

21,886,000

Chapter 14:

Security Expenditure

24,583,000

Unidentified further efficiency gains and savings

(22,613,000)

Total Appropriation (Net)

 1,005,648,000

Chapter 15:

Transfer to Tax Equalization Fund

104,400,000

Total Appropriation (Gross)

 1,110,048,000

b)      The appropriations (net) voted in paragraph (a) above minus estimated Miscellaneous Income in the amount of USD 5,000,000 shall be financed by assessed contributions from Member Nations of USD 1,000,648,000 to implement the Programme of Work. Such contributions shall be established in US dollars and Euro and shall consist of USD 514,196,000 and Euro 374,194,000. This takes into account a split of 52% US dollars and 48% Euro for the appropriations (net) and of 100% US dollars for Miscellaneous Income.

c)      An additional amount of USD 14,100,000 shall also be financed by assessed contributions from Member Nations to fund the After-service Medical Coverage (ASMC) past service liability. The contributions shall be established in US dollars and Euro, taking into account a split of 33% US dollars and 67% Euro, and shall therefore amount to USD 4,653,000 and Euro 7,267,000.

d)      The total contributions due from Member Nations to implement the approved Programme of Work and to fund the amortization of ASMC shall amount to USD 518,849,000 and Euro 381,461,000. Such contributions due from Member Nations in 2014 and 2015 shall be paid in accordance with the scale of contributions adopted by the Conference at its Thirty-eighth session.

e)      In establishing the actual amounts of contributions to be paid by individual Member Nations, a further amount shall be charged through the Tax Equalization Fund for any Member Nation that levies taxes on the salaries, emoluments and indemnities received by staff members from FAO and which are reimbursed to the staff members by the Organization. An estimate of USD 9,200,000 has been foreseen for this purpose.

2)      Authorizes the Director-General, notwithstanding Financial Regulation 4.2, to use any unspent balance of the 2012-13 appropriations for any additional expenditures of a one‑time nature associated with transformational change.

3)      Requests the Director-General to propose adjustments to the Programme of Work for the unidentified further efficiency gains and savings referred to in paragraph 1(a) above and amounting in aggregate to USD 22,613,000, which are currently not reflected in the chapter structure, for consideration by the Programme and Finance Committees and approval by the Council at its 148th Session in December 2013, noting that both within chapter transfers and transfers from one chapter to another required to implement the proposals during the biennium will be handled in accordance with Financial Regulation 4.5.

4)      Appeals to the UN General Assembly to consider the need for greater vigilance with regards to increases in staff costs across the UN Common System, particularly within the context of the ongoing comprehensive review being undertaken by the International Civil Service Commission.

5)      Encourages Members to provide voluntary contributions to facilitate achievement of the Strategic Objectives and implementation of the integrated Programme of Work under the results framework.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Governance, Legal, Administrative and Financial Matters

Governance Matters

Report on the Implementation of the Immediate Plan of Action (IPA)[44]

111.          The Conference:

a)        welcomed the Final Management Report, which outlined a thorough overview of the successful conclusion of  FAO reform, begun by the Conference in 2005 through the Independent External Evaluation;

b)        appreciated the benefits arising from implementation of the IPA, and looked forward to their continued internalization and mainstreaming, in particular those relating to culture change;

c)        urged completion of the remaining 19 IPA actions under the responsibility of the Secretariat;

d)        looked forward to an Independent Review of the outcome of the governance reforms in 2014 for assessment by the 39th Session of the Conference in June 2015;

e)        appreciated the work carried out jointly by Member Nations, Management, Mr David Benfield and Professor Mohammad Saeid Noori Naeini in undertaking FAO Reform; and

f)         endorsed the Final Management Report on the Immediate Plan of Action Implementation and the FAO Reform Process.

Constitutional and Legal Matters

Amendments to the Basic Texts[45]

Amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization[46]

112.          The Conference adopted, through a nominal vote, the following Resolution:

Resolution 8/2013
Amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling that the Conference at its Thirty-sixth Session, 18-23 November 2009, approved amendments to Rule XXXVII of the General Rules of the Organization and that the implementation of this Rule in 2011 underlined the desirability of further amendments thereto in order better to reflect the spirit of the Immediate Plan of Action for FAO Renewal (2009-11);

Recalling that the Committee on Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM) at its Ninety-fourth Session, from 19 to 21 March 2012, and at its Ninety-fifth Session, from 8 to 11 October 2012, proposed amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization;

Noting that the Finance Committee at its Hundred and Forty-third Session, from 7 to 11 May 2012, and at its Hundred and Forty-sixth Session, from 5 to 9 November 2012, reviewed the financial implications of proposed new paragraph 6 of Rule XXXVII of the General Rules of the Organization;

Noting that the Council, at its Hundred and Forty-fourth Session, from 11 to 15 June 2012, and at its Hundred and Forty-fifth Session, from 3 to 7 December 2012, endorsed the Conference Resolution containing amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization;

Decides to adopt the following amendments to Rule XXXVII (Appointment of the Director-General) of the General Rules of the Organization:

Rule XXXVII - Appointment of the Director-General

1.         In pursuance of paragraph 1 of Article VII of the Constitution, the Director-General of the Organization shall be appointed under the following conditions:[47]

(…)

(b) In consideration of the expiry of the term of office of the Director-General, the Council shall set the dates for a period during which Member Nations may submit nominations for the office of Director-General. The nomination period shall have a duration of not less than 12 3 months and end at least 60 30 days prior to the beginning of the session of the Council referred to in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. The nomination period shall be communicated to all Member Nations and Associate Members by the Secretary-General of the Conference and Council. Nominations validly made in accordance with Rule XII, paragraph 5 of these Rules shall be communicated to the Secretary-General of the Conference and Council by the date set by the Council. The Secretary-General shall circulate these nominations to all Member Nations and Associate Members by the date likewise set by the Council, it being understood that in the case of an election taking place at a regular session of the Conference, such date set by the Council shall be not later than 30 days before the session of the Council provided for in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph.

(...)

6.         The Director-General shall take such measures as required to ensure that, as far as possible prior to taking office, a Director-General Elect is duly informed of the policies, programmes, staffing and activities of the Organization. The Director-General shall make arrangements to ensure that the Director-General Elect shall have the benefit of technical and administrative support during that period".

Decides to adopt the following amendments to Rule XL (Provisions Relating to Staff) of the General Rules of the Organization:

Rule XL – Provisions Relating to Staff

1.         The staff of the Organization shall be appointed by the Director-General, having regard to paragraph 3 of Article VIII of the Constitution. Selection and remuneration shall be made without regard to race, nationality, creed or sex. The terms and conditions of appointment shall be fixed in contracts concluded between the Director-General and each member of the staff. Appointments to the posts of Deputy Directors-General shall be made by the Director-General, subject to confirmation by the Council.

2.         Appointments made by the Director-General during the last six months of his or her term of office to positions at grade D-2 and above shall expire not later than five months after the end of that term of office. The new Director-General may extend any such appointments.

2.3.      The Director-General shall submit proposals to the Finance Committee on the scale of salaries and conditions of recruitment and service of the staff and shall report to the Finance Committee and the Council any decisions or recommendations of the International Civil Service Commission relating to such matters. He shall submit proposals to the Finance Committee on the general structure of the administrative and technical services of the Organization. He shall, insofar as may be feasible, arrange for public announcements of staff vacancies and shall fill vacancies in accordance with such competitive methods of selection as he may consider most suitable for various types of appointment.

(other sub-paragraphs renumbered)

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Amendments to Rule XXIX.2, Rule XXX.2, Rule XXXI.2 and Rule XXXII.2 of the General Rules of the Organization[48]

113.          The Conference adopted, through a nominal vote, the following Resolution:

Resolution 9/2013
Amendments to Rule XXIX.2, Rule XXX.2, Rule XXXI.2 and Rule XXXII.2 of
the General Rules of the Organization

THE CONFERENCE

Having taken note of the views of the Committee on Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM), at its Ninety-fifth session (Rome, 8-11 October 2012) on the proposed amendments to Rule XXIX.2 (Committee on Commodity Problems), Rule XXX.2 (Committee on Fisheries), Rule XXXI.2 (Committee on Forestry) and Rule XXXII.2 (Committee on Agriculture) of the General Rules of the Organization;

Considering that the Council, at its Hundred and Forty-fifth Session (Rome, 3-7 December 2012), endorsed the amendments proposed by the CCLM and agreed to transmit them to the Conference for approval;

Having noted that the Rules on membership require the effective presence of Members at the meetings of the above Committees to avoid the validity of deliberations being questioned;

Having further noted that allowing a notification of membership to be made at “any time” creates a high degree of uncertainty and that the proposed amendments would contribute to eliminate this uncertainty by setting a time frame during which no further changes in membership are allowed in respect of an upcoming session of a Committee;

Decides to amend Rule XXIX.2, Rule XXX.2, Rule XXXI.2 and Rule XXXII.2 of the General Rules of the Organization as follows[49]:

“2. The notification referred to in paragraph 1 may be made at any time but not later than 10 days before the opening date of a session. and mMembership acquired on the basis thereof shall be considered valid unless the Member has not been represented at two consecutive sessions of the Committee, or has notified its withdrawal from it. The Director-General shall circulate, at the beginning of each session of the Committee, a document listing the Members of the Committee.”

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Amendments to Rules XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization[50]

114.          The Conference adopted, through a nominal vote, the following Resolution:

Resolution 10/2013
Amendments to Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling that the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), at its Thirty-fifth session, held in Rome from 14 to 17 October 2009, reviewed and adopted the proposals set out in document CFS 2009/2 Rev. 2 “Reform of the Committee on World Food Security”, which was inserted in Volume II of the Basic Texts of the Organization;

Recalling also that the Conference, at its Thirty-sixth session held in Rome from 18 to 23 November 2009, adopted Resolution No. 14/2009 “Reform of the Committee on World Food Security, Amendments to the General Rules of the Organization”;

Recalling further that the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), at its Thirty-seventh session, held in Rome from 17 to 22 October 2011, adopted revised Rules of Procedure and mandated the Bureau to recommend an update of Rule XXXIII of the GRO so that they would “conform with the CFS Reform Document as well as with the revised Rules of Procedure”;

Noting that the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) at its Thirty-ninth Session (Rome, 15-20 October 2012) reviewed and endorsed proposed amendments to Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization for the implementation of the reform of the Committee on World Food Security;

Having taken note of the views of the Committee on Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM), at its Ninety-sixth Session (Rome, 4-6 March 2013) on the amendments endorsed by the CFS to Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization;

Considering that the Council, at its Hundred and Forty-sixth Session (Rome, 22-26 April 2013), endorsed the proposed amendments and agreed to transmit them to the Conference for approval;


 

Decides to amend Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization as follows[51]:

Rule XXXIII – Committee on World Food Security

A. Composition and participation

(…)

6.         The Committee shall normally hold two sessions during each biennium. Sessions shall be convened by the Director-General, in consultation with and the Chairperson and the Bureau of the Committee, taking into account any proposals decision made by the Committee. If required, the Committee may hold additional sessions on the call of the Director-General in consultation with the Chairperson and the Bureau, or on request submitted in writing to the Director-General by the majority of Members of the Committee.

[new] 7.           The Committee may meet in extraordinary (or special) session:         

(a) if at any regular session the Committee so decides; or

(b) if the Bureau so requests.

(following paragraphs to be re-numbered)

D. High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition

12 11. The Committee shall be assisted by a High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition which shall exercise the following functions, hereinafter referred to as the High Level Panel. The functions of the High Level Panel shall be:

a)         to assess and analyze the current state of food security and nutrition and its underlying causes;

b)         to provide scientific and knowledge-based analysis and advice on policy-relevant issues, utilizing existing high-quality research data and technical studies;

c)         to identify emerging issues and assist the Committee and its Members to prioritize future actions and attention on key focal areas.

13 12. The High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition shall consist of a Steering Committee and a subsidiary of ad-hoc Project Teams acting on a project-specific basis and constituting a network of food security and nutrition experts. The High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition shall operate in accordance with the Rules of Procedure of the Committee. 

13. The Steering Committee shall consist of between ten and fifteen highly reputable, internationally-recognized experts on food security and nutrition-related fields, appointed in their personal capacity for a term of office of two years, renewable only once. The members of the Steering Committee shall be appointed by the Bureau of the Committee on the basis of a recommendation of an ad hoc selection committee consisting of representatives of FAO, the World Food Programme, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Bioversity International and a representative of civil society organizations. The Steering Committee shall normally hold two sessions every year, unless otherwise decided by the Committee itself in extraordinary circumstances.  The functions of the Steering Committee shall be:

a) to ensure and follow the preparation of state-of-the-art studies and analysis for consideration by the Committee on a variety of food security and nutrition issues;

b) to assemble expert project teams to prepare studies and analysis in support of decisions of the Committee;

c) to establish and keep under review working methodologies, plans of work and terms of reference for project teams and, in general, manage their work;

d) to review work methodologies and to propose work plans;

e) to perform such related functions as may be required.

14. There shall be a database of experts on all relevant fields related to food security and nutrition who may be nominated by Members of the Committee or any other interested party participating in the proceedings of the Committee.  Drawing from this database, the Steering Committee shall constitute ad hoc project teams to analyse and report on such issues as may be referred by the Steering Committee to the team.  The project teams shall be constituted for pre-determined periods of time and shall be responsible for drafting studies and analysis under the general direction and oversight of the Steering Committee.

(following paragraphs to be re-numbered)

G. Miscellaneous provisions

(…)

22 23. The Committee may decide to establish subsidiary or ad hoc bodies where it considers that such action would expedite its own work, without duplicating the work of existing bodies. A decision to this effect may be taken only after the Committee has examined a report by the Secretary, after consultation with the Organization, the World Food Programme and the International Fund for Agricultural Development Director-General on the administrative and financial implications.

(following paragraph to be re-numbered)

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Administrative and Financial Matters

Audited Accounts 2010-2011[52]

115.          The Conference took note of the Audited Accounts 2010-2011 and the Report of the External Auditor, as reviewed by the Finance Committee at its 147th Session and by the Council at its 145th Session, and adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 11/2013
Audited Accounts 2010-2011

THE CONFERENCE,

Having considered the Report of the 145th Session of the Council, and

Having examined the 2010-2011 FAO Audited Accounts and the External Auditor’s Report thereon

Adopts the Audited Accounts.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Scale of Contributions 2014-2015[53]

116.          The Conference noted that at its 146th Session the Council had recommended that the FAO proposed Scale of Contributions for 2014-2015 be derived from the UN Scale of Assessments established for those years in force during 2013.

117.          The Conference then adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 12/2013
Scale of Contributions 2014-2015

THE CONFERENCE,

Having noted the recommendation of the Hundred and Forty-sixth Session of the Council;

Confirming that, as in the past, FAO should follow the United Nations Scale of Assessments subject to adaption for the different membership of FAO:

1)   Decides that the FAO Scale of Contributions for 2014-15 should be derived directly from the United Nations Scale of Assessments in force during 2013; and

2)   Adopts for use in 2014 and 2015 the Scale as set out in Appendix D of this Report.

(Adopted 22 June 2013)

Payment by the European Union to Cover Administrative and other Expenses Arising out of its Membership in the Organization[54]

118.          The Conference set the lump-sum payment due by the European Union to cover administrative and other expenditures arising out of its membership in the Organization at Euro 563,074 for the 2014-15 biennium.

119.          As in previous biennia, it was proposed that the sum due by the European Union be paid into a trust or special fund established by the Director-General under Financial Regulation 6.7.

Appointments and Elections

Applications for Membership in the Organization[55]

120.          The Conference had before it three applications for membership from: the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade of Brunei Darussalam, in the form of a letter which included formal acceptance of the relevant obligations of the FAO Constitution; the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Singapore, in the form of a letter which included formal acceptance of the relevant obligations of the FAO Constitution; and the Vice‑President of the Republic of South Sudan, in the form of a letter which included formal acceptance of the relevant obligations of the FAO Constitution.

121.          The Conference, in accordance with Article II‑2 and Rule XII‑10 (a), proceeded to a secret ballot on these applications. The results were as follows:


 

Admission of Brunei Darussalam

Number of ballots deposited                                  127

Defective ballots                                        0

Abstentions                                                            2

Number of votes cast                                 125

Majority required                                       96

Votes for                                                   125

Votes Against                                            0

122.          The Conference accordingly admitted Brunei Darussalam to Membership of the Organization.

123.          The Conference decided that, according to the established principles and customs, the minimum contribution due from Brunei Darussalam for three quarters of 2013 was provisionally:

Contribution – Three quarters of 2013

EURO

USD

40,045.85

52,085.15


Admission of the Republic of Singapore

Number of ballots deposited                     127

Defective ballots                                       0

Abstentions                                               1

Number of votes cast                                126

Majority required                                      96

Votes for                                                  126

Votes Against                                           0

124.          The Conference accordingly admitted the Republic of Singapore to Membership of the Organization.

125.          The Conference decided that, according to the established principles and customs, the minimum contribution due from the Republic of Singapore for three quarters of 2013 was provisionally:

Contribution – Three quarters of 2013

EURO

USD

479,119.93

623,161.56

 

Admission of the Republic of South Sudan

Number of ballots deposited                     127

Defective ballots                                       0

Abstentions                                               5

Number of votes cast                                122

Majority required                                      96

Votes for                                                  122

Votes Against                                           0

126.          The Conference accordingly admitted the Republic of South Sudan to Membership of the Organization.

127.          The Conference decided that, according to the established principles and customs, the minimum contribution due from the Republic of South Sudan for three quarters of 2013 was provisionally:

Contribution – Three quarters of 2013

EURO

USD

5,720.84

7,440.74

Appointment of the Independent Chairperson of the Council[56]

128.          The Conference had before it one nomination for the office of Independent Chairperson of the Council.

129.          The Conference, after a secret ballot, appointed Mr Wilfred Joseph Ngirwa (United Republic of Tanzania) to the office of Independent Chairperson of the Council and adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 13/2013
Appointment of the Independent Chairperson of the Council

THE CONFERENCE,

Having proceeded to a secret ballot, in accordance with Rule XII.10 (a) of the General Rules of the Organization;

Taking into account Rule XXIII of the General Rules of the Organization regarding the Independent Chairperson of the Council and Resolution 9/2009 regarding the Independent Chairperson of the Council[57];

Having regard to the need to safeguard the independence and accountability of the role of the Independent Chairperson of the Council:

1.        Declares that Mr Wilfred Joseph Ngirwa is appointed Independent Chairperson of the Council until the Thirty-ninth Session of the Conference (June 2015);

2.        Decides that the conditions of appointment attached to the office of the Independent Chairperson of the Council will be as follows:

a)      The Chairperson is required to be present in Rome for all sessions of the Council, the Conference, the Finance Committee and the Programme Committee and will normally be expected to spend at least six to eight months of the year in Rome;

b)      An annual allowance equivalent to USD 23 800 will be paid to the Chairperson;

c)      A per diem allowance equivalent to the applicable standard daily subsistence allowance (DSA) rate at 140% will be paid to the Chairperson while in Rome and when he travels in the performance of his functions;

d)      The travel expenses of the Chairperson will be covered by the Organization when travelling in the performance of his functions;

e)      In the performance of his functions, whether in Rome or while travelling, the Chairperson will receive health protection and medical insurance in accordance with Section 343 Part VII of the FAO Administrative Manual;

f)       Secretariat services will be made available to the Chairperson to assist him in the performance of his functions;

g)      Interpretation services will be made available to the Chairperson, at his request, depending on the availability of resources;


 

h)      Office space, equipment and supplies required by the Chairperson in the performance of his functions will be made available to him;

i)        Assistance will be provided to the Chairperson in carrying out the necessary administrative formalities for the acquisition of the documents required for his stay in Rome and for his travels in the performance of his functions.

3.        Decides that the implementation modalities of this Resolution will be agreed between the Chairperson and FAO.

4.        Requests that the allowances and conditions associated with the office of the Independent Chairperson of the Council be reviewed by the Finance Committee at its 150th Session in November 2013, and that they be adjusted as may be recommended by that Committee.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Election of Council Members[58]

130.          The Conference elected the following Member Nations as Members of the Council:

Period from the end of the 38th Session of the Conference (June 2013) to 30 June 2016

Region (Seats)

Members

Africa (5)

1. Angola

2. Liberia

3. Madagascar

4. Morocco

5. South Africa

Asia (0)

 

Europe (3)

1. Hungary

2. Russian Federation

3. Turkey

Latin America and the Caribbean (5)

1. Argentina

2. Brazil

3. Cuba

4. Mexico

5. Trinidad and Tobago

Near East (2)

1. Iran

2. Iraq

North America (2)

1. Canada

2. United States of America

Southwest Pacific (0)

 

 


 

Period 1 July 2014 to the end of the 40th Session of the Conference (June 2017)

Region (Seats)

Members

Africa (4)

1. Algeria
2. Cameroon
3. Mali
4. Zimbabwe

Asia (3)

1. India
2. Malaysia
3. Pakistan

Europe (4)

1. Czech Republic
2. France
3. Iceland
4. Italy

Latin America and the Caribbean (1)

1. Ecuador

Near East (3)

1. Afghanistan

2. Egypt

3. Saudi Arabia

North America (0)

 

Southwest Pacific (1)

1. Australia

Appointment of Representatives of the FAO Conference to the
Staff Pension Committee
[59]

131.          In accordance with Article 6(c) of the Regulations of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, the Conference appointed two members and two alternate members to the Staff Pension Committee as follows and for the periods specified below:

For the period 1 January 2014 – 31 December 2016

Member           Mr Juan Manuel Cammarano
Alternate Permanent Representative of the United States Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome

Alternate          Mr Vladimir Navara
Head of Administration of the Russian Permanent Mission to FAO and other international organizations in Rome

For the period 1 January 2015 – 31 December 2017

Member           Mr Mafizur Rahman
Alternate Permanent Representative of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh to FAO

Alternate          Ms Lorena Patiño
Alternate Permanent Representative of Paraguay to FAO

Other Matters

Date and Place of the 39th Session of the Conference[60]

132.          The Conference decided that its 39th Session should be held in Rome from 6 to 13 June 2015.

Awards Ceremony[61]

133.          The Conference considered the proposal forwarded by the 146th Session of Council (April 2013) to hold the Awards Ceremony on an occasion other than the Conference, on the understanding that the proposal would be implemented as of the 39th Session of the Conference (June 2015) and reviewed at the 40th Session of Conference (June 2017).

Resolution 14/2013
Awards Ceremony

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling its previous Resolutions, which established awards in recognition of the achievements of former Directors-General of the Organization:

a)         B.R. Sen Award (Resolution 33/67);

b)        A.H. Boerma Award (Resolution 1/75);

c)         Edouard Saouma Award (Resolution 2/93); and

d)        Jacques Diouf Award for Food Security (Resolution 1/2011).

Recalling Conference Resolution 18/97, which established the Margarita Lizárraga Medal as a biennial award to be made by the Conference;

 

Appreciating that the above Awards were established as a tribute to the unique contribution made by B.R. Sen, A.H. Boerma, Edouard Saouma, Jacques Diouf and Margarita Lizárraga in working towards a world free from hunger and malnutrition;

Noting, in the context of FAO’s transformational process and related efforts to achieve greater efficiency in the Governing Bodies, the merits of:

a)      Giving greater public visibility of the Awards and Awardees;

b)      Increasing the time available during Conference sessions to focus on substantial agenda items;

c)      Streamlining selection processes and timelines; and

d)      Taking advantage of synergies with an existing FAO event, to attract more international media attention for the Awards.

Recognizing that the imperative of achieving food security needs to be kept high on the global agenda, and that the achievements of exceptional individuals and institutions in working towards the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition is of considerable interest to international media networks;

Decides to establish, as of 2015, a single, recurring prestigious event, “The FAO Awards”, with no incremental costs being incurred compared to the Awards Ceremony previously held at Sessions of Conference;

Further decides to review this new approach to FAO Awards at the 40th Session of the Conference in June 2017.

(Adopted on 22 June 2013)

Recognizing Outstanding Progress in Fighting Hunger[62]

134.          A Special Event attended by seven Heads of State and three Heads of Government was held on Sunday 16 June to recognize those countries which had made outstanding progress in the fight against hunger with a view to improving the food security of their citizens. The Event recognized:

a)         countries that had already attained the World Food Summit (WFS) target, having reduced by half or more the number of undernourished estimated in 1990/92 (18 countries): Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cuba, Djibouti, Georgia, Ghana, Guyana, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Nicaragua, Peru, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Thailand, Turkmenistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) and Viet Nam; and

b)        countries that have already attained the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 1,Target 1.C, having reduced the prevalence of undernourishment by 50 percent or more compared to the level of 1990/92, or reduced it below 5 percent (20 countries): Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Brazil, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Honduras, Indonesia, Jordan, Malawi, Maldives, Niger, Nigeria, Panama, Togo and Uruguay.

 


Appendix A

Agenda for the 38th Session of the Conference

 

Introduction

 

 

1.

Election of the Chairperson and Vice-Chairpersons

 

 

2.

Appointment of the General Committee and Credentials Committee

 

 

3.

Adoption of the Agenda and Arrangements for the Session

 

 

4.

Admission of Observers

 

 

Appointments and Elections

 

 

5.

Applications for Membership in the Organization

 

 

6.

Appointment of the Independent Chairperson of the Council

 

 

7.

Election of Council Members

 

 

8.

Appointment of Representatives of the FAO Conference to the Staff Pension Committee

 

 

Substantive and Policy Matters

 

 

9.

Review of the State of Food and Agriculture

 

 

A. Regional Conferences

 

 

10.

Regional and Global Policy and Regulatory matters arising from:

 

 

 

10.1

Report of the 31st Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific
(Hanoi, Viet Nam, 12-16 March 2012)

 

 

 

10.2

Report of the 32nd Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean
(Buenos Aires, Argentina, 26‑30 March 2012)

 

 

 

10.3

Report of the 28th Regional Conference for Europe
(Baku, Azerbaijan, 17‑20 April 2012)

 

 

 

10.4

Report of the 27th Regional Conference for Africa
(Brazzaville, Congo, 23‑27 April 2012)

 

 

 

10.5

Report of the 31st Regional Conference for the Near East
(Rome, Italy, 14-18 May 2012)

 

 

 

10.6

Input from the Informal Regional Conference for North America
(Ottawa, Canada, 3-5 April 2012)


 

 

B. Technical Committees

 

 

11.

Global Policy and Regulatory matters arising from:

 

 

 

11.1

Report of the 23rd Session of the Committee on Agriculture (21‑25 May 2012)

 

 

 

11.2

Report of the 69th Session of the Committee on Commodity Problems (28‑30 May 2012)

 

 

 

11.3

Report of the 30th Session of the Committee on Fisheries (9-13 July 2012)

 

 

 

11.4

Report of the 21st Session of the Committee on Forestry (24‑28 September 2012)

 

 

C. Committee on World Food Security

 

 

12.

Reports of the 37th (17-22 October 2011), 38th (Special) (11 May 2012) and 39th (15‑20 October 2012) Sessions of the Committee on World Food Security

 

 

D. Other Substantive and Policy Matters

 

 

13.

FAO Gender Policy and the UN System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (SWAP)

 

 

14.

Interim Report on the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review of Operational Activities for Development of the United Nations System

 

 

15.

Report of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (15‑19 April 2013)

 

 

16.

International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides

 

 

17.

Preparations for the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2)

 

 

18.

International Years and Days:

 

 

 

18.1

Evaluation of the International Year of Forests 2011

 

 

 

18.2

International Year of Cooperatives 2012

 

 

 

18.3

International Year of Quinoa 2013

 

 

 

18.4

International Year of Family Farming 2014

 

 

 

18.5

World Soil Day

 

 

 

18.6

International Year of Soils

 

 

 

18.7

International Year of Pulses

 

 

19.

United Nations/FAO World Food Programme

 

 

Programme and Budgetary Matters

 

 

20.

Programme Implementation Report 2010-2011

 

 

21.

Programme Evaluation Report 2013

 

 

22.

Reviewed Strategic Framework

 

 

23.

Medium Term Plan 2014-2017 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014-2015
(Draft Resolution on budget level)

 

 


Governance, Legal, Administrative and Financial Matters

 

 

A. Governance Matters

 

 

24.

Report on Implementation of the Immediate Plan of Action (IPA)

 

 

B. Constitutional and Legal Matters

 

 

25.

Amendments to the Basic Texts

 

 

 

25.1

Proposed Amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

 

 

 

25.2

Proposed Amendments to Rule XXIX.2, Rule XXX.2, Rule XXXI.2 and Rule XXXII.2 of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

 

 

 

25.3

Proposed Amendments to Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

 

 

26.

Other Constitutional and Legal Matters

 

 

C. Administrative and Financial Matters

 

 

27.

Audited Accounts 2010-2011 (Draft Resolution)

 

 

28.

Scale of Contributions 2014-2015 (Draft Resolution)

 

 

29.

Payment by the European Union to Cover Administrative and other Expenses Arising out of its Membership in the Organization

 

 

30.

Other Administrative and Financial Matters

 

 

Other Matters

 

 

31.

Date and Place of the 39th Session of the Conference

 

 

32.

Any Other Matters

 

 

 

32.1

McDougall Memorial Lecture

 

 

 

32.2

Presentation of B.R. Sen Awards

 

 

 

32.3

Presentation of A.H. Boerma Award

 

 

 

32.4

Presentation of Edouard Saouma Award

 

 

 

32.5

Presentation of Jacques Diouf Award

 

 

 

32.6

Presentation of the Margarita Lizárraga Medal

 

 

 

32.7

Statement by a Representative of FAO Staff Bodies

 

 

 

32.8

In Memoriam

 

 


Appendix B

List of Documents

 

C 2013/1 Rev.1

Provisional Agenda

C 2013/2

The State of Food and Agriculture

C 2013/2 Add.1

The State of Food and Agriculture: Sustainable Food Systems for Food Security and Nutrition

C 2013/3

Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014‑15

C 2013/3 Corr.1 (English only)

Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014-15
Corrigendum

C 2013/3 Information Note 1

Cost increase assumptions and estimates – Update and additional information

C 2013/3 Information Note 2

Requests stemming from the Programme and Finance Committees
(18-22 March 2013)

C 2013/3 Information Note 3

Cost increase assumptions and estimates - Further Update

C 2013/3 Information Note 4

Progression of budgetary requirements from 2012-13 to 2014-15

C 2013/3 Information Note 5

Implementation arrangements – matrix management

C 2013/3 Information Note 6

Possible options to reduce increases in staff costs (other than efficiency measures)

C 2013/3 Information Note 7

Increasing the integration and visibility of the gender function in FAO's work

C 2013/3 Information Note 8

Impact of new Scale of Contributions 2014-15

C 2013/3 Information Note 9

Further efficiency gains and savings in 2014-15

C 2013/3 Information Note 10

FAO’s Comparative advantage in relation to Social Protection

C 2013/3
Web Annex

Annex XI: List of Scheduled Sessions

C 2013/3
Web Annex

Annex XII: Strategic Objectives Action Plans

C 2013/4

Programme Evaluation Report 2013

C 2013/5 A

Audited Accounts 2010-2011

C 2013/5 B

Audited Accounts 2010-2011: Report of the External Auditor

C 2013/6

Appointment of Representatives of the FAO Conference to the Staff Pension Committee

C 2013/7

Reviewed Strategic Framework

C 2013/8

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11

C 2013/8 Corr.1

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11 - Corrigendum

C 2013/8 Corr.2

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11 - Corrigendum

C 2013/8
Web Annex

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11 - Web Annex

C 2013/9

Appointment of the Independent Chairperson of the Council

C 2013/10 Rev.2

Applications for Membership in the Organization

C 2013/11

Election of Council Members

C 2013/12

Arrangements for the 38th Session of the Conference

C 2013/13 Rev.1

Admission to the Session of Representatives and Observers of International Organizations

C 2013/13 Add.1

Admission to the Session of Representatives and Observers of International Organizations

C 2013/14 Rev.1
(CL 144/4 Rev.1)

Report of the 27th Session of the Regional Conference for Africa
(Brazzaville, Congo, 23-27 April 2012)

C 2013/15
(CL 144/5)

Report of the 31st Session of the Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific (Hanoi, Viet Nam, 12-16 March 2012)

C 2013/16
(CL 144/6)

Report of the 28th Session of the Regional Conference for Europe
(Baku, Azerbaijan, 17-20 April 2012)

C 2013/17
(CL 144/7)

Report of the 32nd Session of the Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 26-30 March 2012)

C 2013/18
(CL 144/8)

Report of the 31st Session of the Regional Conference for the Near East
(Rome, Italy, 14‑18 May 2012)

C 2013/19
(CL 143/2)

Report of the 37th Session of the Committee on World Food Security
(17-22 October 2011)

C 2013/20
(CL 144/9)

Report of the 38th (Special) Session of the Committee on World Food Security (11 May 2012)

C 2013/21

Report of the 39th Session of the Committee on World Food Security
(15-20 October 2012)

C 2013/22

Report of the 23rd Session of the Committee on Agriculture
(21‑25 May 2012)

C 2013/23

Report of the 69th Session of the Committee on Commodity Problems
(28‑30 May 2012)

C 2013/24

Report of the 30th Session of the Committee on Fisheries
(9‑13 July 2012)

C 2013/25

Report of the 21st Session of the Committee on Forestry
(24‑28 September 2012)

C 2013/26

Final Management Report on IPA Implementation and the FAO Reform Process

C 2013/26
Web Annex 1
(English only)

Annex VIII -
IPA Benefits Information in original IPA sequence/format

C 2013/26
Web Annex 2
(English only)

Web Annex IX -
Status of IPA Actions in original IPA sequence/format

C 2013/27

FAO Gender Policy and the UN System-wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (SWAP)

C 2013/28

Interim Report on the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review (QCPR) of Operational Activities for Development of the United Nations System

C 2013/29

Report of the 14th Regular Session of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (15-19 April 2013)

C 2013/30

International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management

C 2013/31

Preparations for the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2)

C 2013/32

Evaluation of the International Year of Forests 2011

C 2013/33

International Year of Cooperatives 2012

C 2013/34

International Year of Quinoa 2013

C 2013/35

International Year of Family Farming 2014

C 2013/36

Observance of the World Soil Day

 

 

C 2013 INF Series

C 2013/INF/1 Rev.1

Provisional Timetable

C 2013/INF/2

Annual Report of the WFP Executive Board to ECOSOC and the FAO Council on its Activities in 2011

C 2013/INF/3

Annual Report of the WFP Executive Board to ECOSOC and the FAO Council on its activities in 2012

C 2013/INF/4

Statement of Competence and Voting Rights Submitted by the
European Union and its Member States

C 2013/INF/5

Multilateral Treaties Deposited with the Director-General

C 2013/INF/6

Notification of Membership of the Committee on Commodity Problems; Committee on Fisheries; Committee on Forestry; Committee on Agriculture; and Committee on World Food Security

C 2013/INF/7

Presentation of the B.R. Sen Award 2011 and 2012

C 2013/INF/8

Presentation of the A.H. Boerma Award 2012-2013

C 2013/INF/9

Presentation of the Edouard Saouma Award 2012-2013

C 2013/INF/10

Presentation of the Jacques Diouf Award 2012-2013

C 2013/INF/11

Twenty-eighth McDougall Memorial Lecture

C 2013/INF/12

Status of Current Assessments and Arrears as at 11 June 2013

C 2013/INF/12 Corr.1 (English only)

Status of Current Assessments and Arrears as at 11 June 2013 - Corrigendum (English only)

C 2013/INF/13

Statement of the Director-General

C 2013/INF/14

Address of His Holiness Pope Francis

C 2013/INF/15

List of Documents

 

 

 

C 2013 LIM Series

C 2013/LIM/1
(CL 144/LIM/4)

Input from the Informal Regional Conference for North America
(Ottawa, Canada, 3-5 April 2012)

C 2013/LIM/2

Programme Implementation Report 2010-11 (Extract from the Report of the 145th Council Session, 3-7 December 2012)

C 2013/LIM/3

International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/4

Audited Accounts 2010-11 (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/5

Amendments to Rules XXXVII and XL of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/6

Amendments to Rule XXIX.2, Rule XXX.2, Rule XXXI.2 and Rule XXXII.2 of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/7

Margarita Lizárraga Medal

C 2013/LIM/8

Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014‑15 (Recommendations to the Conference on budget level)

C 2013/LIM/9

Arrangements for the 38th Session of the FAO Conference
(Recommendations to the Conference)

C 2013/LIM/10 Rev.1

Scale of Contributions 2014-15 (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1

First Report of the General Committee

C 2013/LIM/12

First Report of the Credentials Committee

C 2013/LIM/13 Rev.1

Second Report of the General Committee

C 2013/LIM/14

Payment by the European Union to cover Administrative and Other Expenses Arising out of its Membership in the Organization

C 2013/LIM/15

FAO Policy on Proclamation and Implementation of International Years

C 2013/LIM/16

International Year of Soils (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/17

International Year of Pulses (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/18

Awards Ceremony (Draft Resolution)

 

 

C 2013/LIM/19

Reviewed Strategic Framework (Extract from the Report of the 146th Session of Council, 22-26 April 2013)

C 2013/LIM/20

Final Management Report on IPA Implementation and the FAO Reform Process (Extract from the Report of the 146th Session of Council,
22-26 April 2013)

C 2013/LIM/21

Amendments to Rule XXXIII of the General Rules of the Organization (Draft Resolution)

C 2013/LIM/22

Second Report of the Credentials Committee

C 2013/LIM/23 Rev.1

Third Report of the Credentials Committee

C 2013/LIM/24

Third Report of the General Committee

 

 

C 2013 Web Documents

C 2013

List of Delegates and Observers

C 2013 REP Series

C 2013/REP/1 to 9

Draft Reports of Plenary

and

 

C 2013/REP/25 to 32.8

 

 

 

C 2013/I/REP 10 to
18.7 Corr.1

Draft Reports of Commission I

and

 

C 2013/I/REP 19

 

 

 

C 2013/II/REP/20 to 24

Draft Reports of Commission II

 

 

C 2013 PV Series

 

C 2013/PV/1 to 12

Verbatim Records of Plenary

C 2013/I/PV/1 to 6

Verbatim Records of Commission I

C 2013/II/PV/1 to 2

Verbatim Records of Commission II

 

 

C 2013 DJ Series

 

C 2013/DJ/1 to 8

Daily Journals of the Conference

C 2013/DJ/Announcements

Announcements

 

 

 


Appendix C

International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management

Article 1. Objectives of the Code

1.1    The objectives of this Code are to establish voluntary standards of conduct for all public and private entities engaged in or associated with the management of pesticides, particularly where there is inadequate or no national legislation to regulate pesticides.

1.2       The entities which are addressed by this Code include governments, international organizations, pesticide industry, application equipment industry, traders of pesticides, pest control operators (PCOs), food industry and other industries that use or have an interest in pesticides, pesticide users, and public-interest groups such as environmental groups, consumer groups and trade unions.

1.3    The Code is designed for use within the context of national legislation as a basis whereby relevant entities addressed by the Code may determine whether their proposed actions and/or the actions of others constitute acceptable practices.

1.4     The Code describes the shared responsibility of many sectors of society to work together so that the benefits to be derived from the necessary and acceptable use of pesticides are achieved without significant adverse effects on human and animal health and/or the environment. To this end, all references in this Code to a government or governments shall be deemed to apply equally to regional groupings of governments for matters falling within their areas of competence.

1.5     The Code addresses the need for a cooperative effort between governments of pesticide exporting and importing countries to promote practices that minimize potential health and environmental risks associated with pesticides, while ensuring their effective use.

1.6     The Code recognizes that relevant training at all appropriate levels is an essential requirement in implementing and observing its provisions. Therefore, entities addressed by the Code should give high priority to relevant training and capacity building activities related to each Article of the Code.

1.7     The standards of conduct set forth in this Code:

1.7.1       encourage responsible and generally accepted trade practices;

1.7.2       assist countries which have not yet established regulatory controls on the quality and suitability of pesticide products needed in that country to promote the judicious and efficient use of such products and address the potential risks associated with their use;

1.7.3       promote practices which reduce risks throughout the lifecycle of pesticides, with the aim of minimizing adverse effects on humans, animals and the environment and preventing accidental poisoning resulting from handling, storage, transport, use or disposal, as well as from the presence of pesticide residues in food and feed;

1.7.4       ensure that pesticides are used effectively and efficiently and in a manner that contributes to the sustainable improvement of agriculture, public and animal health and the environment;

1.7.5       adopt the "life-cycle” approach to management of pesticides to address all major aspects related to the development, registration, production, trade, packaging, labelling, distribution, storage, transport, handling, application, use, disposal and monitoring of pesticides and pesticide residues as well as management of pesticide waste and pesticide containers;

1.7.6       are designed to promote Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Integrated Vector Management (IVM);

1.7.7    promote participation in information exchange and international agreements identified in Annex 1, in particular the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent (PIC) Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade (1)[63].

Article 2. Terms and definitions

For the purpose of this Code:

Active ingredient means the part of the product that provides the pesticidal action.

Advertising means the promotion of the sale and use of pesticides by printed and electronic media, signs, displays, gifts, demonstration or word of mouth.

Application equipment means any technical aid, equipment, implement or machinery which is used for the application of pesticides.

Application technology means the actual physical delivery and distribution process of a pesticide to the target organism or to the place where the target organism comes into contact with the pesticide.

Banned pesticide means a pesticide all uses of which have been prohibited by final regulatory action, in order to protect human health or the environment. It includes a pesticide that has been refused approval for first-time use, or has been withdrawn by industry either from the domestic market or from further consideration in the domestic approval process, and where there is clear evidence that such action has been taken in order to protect human health or the environment.

Co-formulant means a non-active ingredient component of a formulated product.

Container means any object used to hold a pesticide product.

Disposal means any operation to recycle, neutralize, destroy or isolate pesticide waste, used containers and contaminated materials.

Distribution means the process by which pesticides are supplied through trade channels to local or international markets.

Environment means surroundings, including water, air, soil and their interrelationship as well as all relationships between them and any living organisms.

Equivalence means the determination of the similarity of the impurity and toxicological profile, as well as of the physical and chemical properties, presented by supposedly similar technical material originating from different manufacturers, in order to assess whether they present similar levels of risk.

Extension service means the entities in a country which are responsible for the transfer of information, technology advice and training regarding the improvement of agricultural practices, including production, handling, storage and marketing of agricultural commodities.

Formulation means the combination of various ingredients designed to render the product useful and effective for the purpose claimed and for the envisaged mode of application.

Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) in the use of pesticides includes the officially recommended or nationally authorized uses of pesticides under actual conditions necessary for effective and reliable pest control. It encompasses a range of levels of pesticide applications up to the highest authorized use, applied in a manner which leaves a residue which is the smallest amount practicable.

Hazard means the inherent property of a substance, agent or situation having the potential to cause undesirable consequences (e.g. properties that can cause adverse effects or damage to health, the environment or property).

Highly Hazardous Pesticides means pesticides that are acknowledged to present particularly high levels of acute or chronic hazards to health or environment according to internationally accepted classification systems such as WHO or GHS or their listing in relevant binding international agreements or conventions. In addition, pesticides that appear to cause severe or irreversible harm to health or the environment under conditions of use in a country may be considered to be and treated as highly hazardous.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) means the careful consideration of all available pest control techniques and subsequent integration of appropriate measures that discourage the development of pest populations and keep pesticides and other interventions to levels that are economically justified and reduce or minimize risks to human and animal health and/or the environment. IPM emphasizes the growth of a healthy crop with the least possible disruption to agro-ecosystems and encourages natural pest control mechanisms.

Integrated Vector Management (IVM) means the rational decision-making process for the optimal use of resources for disease vector control. It aims to improve efficacy, cost-effectiveness, ecological soundness and sustainability of disease vector control interventions for control of vector-borne diseases.

International Organization means a public intergovernmental organization including the UN, UN Specialized Agencies and Programmes, Development Banks, and CGIAR Member Centres, International Scientific Bodies such as IUPAC, CIPAC, SETAC.

Label means the written, printed or graphic matter on, or attached to, the pesticide or the immediate container thereof and also to the outside container or wrapper of the retail package of the pesticide.

Life cycle means all the stages a pesticide might pass through from production to its degradation in the environment after use, or its destruction as an unused product. The life cycle includes manufacture, formulation, packaging, distribution, storage, transport, use and final disposal of a pesticide product and/or its container.

Manufacturer means a corporation or other entity in the public or private sector (including an individual) engaged in the business or function (whether directly or through an agent or entity controlled by or under contract with it) of manufacturing a pesticide active ingredient or preparing its formulation or product.

Marketing means the overall process of product promotion, including advertising, product public relations and information services as well as the distribution and sale on local or international markets.

Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) means the maximum concentration of a residue that is legally permitted or recognized as acceptable in or on a food or agricultural commodity or animal feedstuff.

Packaging means the container together with the protective wrapping used to carry pesticide products via wholesale or retail distribution to users.

Personal protective equipment means any clothes, materials or devices that provide protection from pesticide exposure during handling and application. In the context of this Code, it includes both specifically designed protective equipment and clothing reserved for pesticide application and handling.

Pest means any species, strain or biotype of plant, animal or pathogenic agent injurious to plants and plant products, materials or environments and includes vectors of parasites or pathogens of human and animal disease and animals causing public health nuisance.

Pest Control Operator (PCO) means any person or company that apply pesticides as a profession.

Pesticide means any substance, or mixture of substances of chemical or biological ingredients intended for repelling, destroying or controlling any pest, or regulating plant growth.

Pesticide management means the regulatory and technical control of all aspects of the pesticide life cycle, including production (manufacture and formulation), authorization, import, distribution, sale, supply, transport, storage, handling, application and disposal of pesticides and their containers to ensure safety and efficacy and to minimize adverse health and environmental effects and human and animal exposure.

Poison means a substance that can cause disturbance of structure or function, leading to illness, injury or death when absorbed in relatively small amounts by human beings, plants or animals.

Poisoning means occurrence of damage or disturbance caused by a poison, and includes intoxication.

Product (or pesticide product) means the formulated product (pesticide active ingredient(s) and co-formulants), in the form in which it is packaged and sold.

Product stewardship means the responsible and ethical management of a pesticide product from its discovery through to its ultimate use and beyond.

Public Interest Group means (but is not limited to) scientific association, farmer group, citizens' organization, labour union and non-governmental environmental, consumer and health organization.

Public health uses of pesticides means pesticides that are used in the control of pests of public health significance. They include disease vector control pesticides, household pesticide products, and professional pest control pesticides (used by pest control operators in homes and public areas).

Registration means the process whereby the responsible national government or regional authority approves the sale and use of a pesticide following the evaluation of scientific data aimed at demonstrating that the product is effective for its intended purposes and does not pose an unacceptable risk to human or animal health or the environment under the conditions of use in the country or region.

Repackaging means the transfer of a pesticide from any authorized commercial package into any other, usually smaller, container for subsequent sale.

Residue means any specified substances in or on food, agricultural and other types of commodities or animal feed as well as in environmental media including soil, air and water resulting from the use of a pesticide. The term includes any derivatives of a pesticide, such as conversion products, metabolites, breakdown products, reaction products and impurities considered to be of toxicological or ecotoxicological significance. The term "pesticide residue" includes residues from unknown or unavoidable sources (e.g. environmental contamination) as well as known, authorized uses of the chemical.

Responsible authority means the government agency or agencies responsible for regulating pesticides and more generally for implementing pesticide legislation.

Risk is the probability and severity of an adverse health or environmental effect occurring as a function of a hazard and the likelihood and the extent of exposure to a pesticide.

Severely restricted pesticide means a pesticide virtually all use of which has been prohibited by final regulatory action in order to protect human health or the environment, but for which certain specific uses remain allowed. It includes a pesticide that has, for virtually all use, been refused for approval or been withdrawn by industry either from the market or from further consideration in the domestic approval process, and where there is clear evidence that such action has been taken in order to protect human health or the environment.

Specification means the parameters and criteria defining the physical appearance and physical and chemical properties of technical and formulated pesticides linked with hazard and risk profiles.

Tender means a formal request for bids in the procurement of pesticides.

Toxicity means a physiological or biological property which determines the capacity of a chemical to do harm or produce injury to a living organism by other than mechanical means.

Trader means anyone engaged in trade, including export, import and domestic distribution.

Vulnerable groups means persons that include pregnant and nursing women, the unborn, infants and children, the elderly, HIV/AIDS affected people and, when subject to high exposure to pesticides over the long term, workers and residents.

Article 3. Pesticide management

3.1       Governments have the overall responsibility for regulating the availability, distribution and use of pesticides in their countries and should ensure the allocation of adequate resources for this mandate (2).

3.2     Pesticide industry should adhere to the provisions of this Code as a standard for the manufacture, distribution, sale and advertising of pesticides. This is particularly important in those countries that have not yet established or are unable to effectively operate adequate regulatory schemes and advisory services.

3.3       Governments, industry and other entities addressed by this Code, should ensure that the requirements of relevant international agreements are followed.

3.4       Governments of pesticide exporting countries should, to the extent possible ensure that good trading practices are followed in the export of pesticides, especially with those countries that have not yet established adequate regulatory schemes:

3.5       Pesticide industry and traders should observe the following practices in pesticide management. This is particularly important in those countries that have not yet established or are unable to effectively operate adequate regulatory schemes and advisory services.

3.5.1         supply only pesticides of adequate quality, packaged and labelled as appropriate for each specific market (3);

3.5.2         in close cooperation with procurers of pesticides, adhere closely to the provisions of FAO and WHO guidance on procurement and tender procedures (4, 5);

3.5.3         pay special attention to the choice of pesticide formulations and to presentation, packaging and labelling in order to minimize risks to users, the public and the environment;

3.5.4         provide, with each package of pesticide, information and instructions in one or more of the official languages of the country and in a form adequate to ensure effective use, and minimize risks to users, the public and the environment;

3.5.5         be capable of providing effective technical support, backed up by full product stewardship to end user level, including advice on and implementation of mechanisms for the effective management of unused and obsolete pesticides and empty pesticide containers;

3.5.6         retain an active interest in following their products through their entire life-cycle, keeping track of major uses and the occurrence of any problems arising from the use of their products, as a basis for determining the need for changes in labelling, directions for use, packaging, formulation or product availability.

3.6       Pesticides whose handling and application require the use of personal protective equipment that is uncomfortable, expensive or not readily available should be avoided, especially in the case of small-scale users and farm workers in hot climates (6).

3.7       All relevant entities addressed by this Code should take coordinated action to produce and disseminate relevant and clear educational materials through all available media to extension services, agricultural and public health advisory services, farmers and farmers' organizations, pest control operators, public health workers and other entities providing advice on pesticide management. Users should be encouraged to seek educational materials and be helped to understand and follow its advice before handling and applying pesticides.

3.8       Concerted efforts should be made by governments to develop and promote the use of IPM/IVM. Furthermore, lending institutions, donor agencies and governments should support the development of national IPM/IVM policies and improved IPM/IVM concepts and practices. These should be based on strategies that promote increased participation of farmers, (including women's groups), extension agents and on-farm researchers, communities, and relevant  entities from the public health and other sectors.

3.9       All stakeholders, including farmers and farmer associations, IPM/IVM researchers, extension agents, crop consultants, food industry, manufacturers of biological and chemical pesticides and application equipment, PCOs, public health workers, environmentalists and representatives of consumer groups and other public interest groups should play a proactive role in the development and promotion of IPM/IVM.

3.10     Governments, with the support of relevant international and regional organizations, donor agencies and research funds, should encourage and promote research on, and the development of, alternatives to existing pesticides that pose fewer risks such as biological control agents and techniques; non-chemical pesticides and pest control methods; pesticides that are of low risk to human and animal health and the environment, that as far as possible or desirable, are target-specific, and that degrade into innocuous constituent parts or metabolites after use.

3.11     Governments, pesticide industry and the application equipment industry should develop and promote the use of pesticide application methods (7, 8, 9, 10, 11) and equipment (12, 13, 14, 15, 16) that minimize the risks from pesticides to human and animal health and/or the environment and that optimize efficiency and cost-effectiveness, and should conduct periodic practical training in such activities (17). The application equipment industry should also provide users with information on proper maintenance and use of application equipment.

3.12     Governments, pesticide industry and national and international organizations should collaborate to develop and promote strategies to prevent and manage pest resistance to pesticides in order to prolong the useful life of valuable pesticides and reduce the adverse effects of resistance to pesticides. This should include consideration of the impacts of pesticides used in agriculture on resistance development among disease vectors and public health pests (18).

3.13     Governments whose programmes for regulating pesticides are well developed should, to the extent possible, provide technical assistance, including training, to other countries in developing their infrastructure and capacity to manage pesticides throughout their life-cycle.


 

Article 4. Testing of pesticides

4.1       Pesticide industry should:

4.1.1         ensure that each pesticide and pesticide product is adequately and effectively tested by recognized procedures and test methods so as to fully evaluate its inherent physical, chemical or biological properties, efficacy (19, 20), behaviour, fate, hazard and risk (21, 22) with regard to the various anticipated uses and conditions in regions or countries of use;

4.1.2         ensure that such tests are conducted in accordance with sound scientific and experimental procedures and the principles of good laboratory and experimental practice (23);

4.1.3         make available copies or summaries of the original reports of such tests for assessment by responsible government authorities in all countries where the pesticide is to be offered for sale or use. If translated documents are provided, their accuracy should be certified;

4.1.4         ensure that the proposed use, label claims and directions, packages, safety data sheets, technical literature and advertising truly reflect the outcome of these scientific tests and assessments;

4.1.5         provide, at the request of a country, methods for the analysis of any active ingredient, co-formulant or relevant impurity or formulation that they manufacture, and provide the necessary analytical standards;

4.1.6         provide advice and assistance in the training of technical staff involved in the relevant analytical work. Formulators should actively support this effort;

4.1.7         conduct residue trials prior to marketing, at least in accordance with Codex Alimentarius and FAO guidelines on good analytical practice (16) and on crop residue data (17, 18, 19) in order to provide a basis for establishing appropriate maximum residue limits (20).

4.2       Each country should possess or have access to facilities to verify and exercise control over the quality of pesticides offered for sale or export, to establish the quantity of the active ingredient or ingredients and the suitability of their formulation, according to FAO or WHO recommended specifications or national specifications, when available (21). Where a country lacks suitable facilities, access to laboratories in another country should be considered.

4.3       International organizations and other interested bodies should, within available resources, consider assisting in the establishment of analytical laboratories, or strengthening existing laboratories, in pesticide importing countries, either on a national or a regional basis. All such laboratories should be set up in a manner that assures their economic and technical sustainability beyond the scope of assistance provided by international organizations and other interested bodies. These laboratories should adhere to sound scientific procedures and guidelines for good laboratory practice, should possess the necessary expertise and should have adequate analytical equipment and supplies of certified analytical standards, solvents, reagents and appropriate, up-to-date analytical methods.

4.4       Exporting governments and international organizations should play an active role in assisting developing countries in training personnel and providing guidance on the design and conduct of trials, the interpretation and evaluation of test data, and risk/benefit analysis. They should also promote maximum availability to, and use by developing countries of, appropriate international, regional and national assessments and evaluations of pesticide hazards and risks.

4.5       Pesticide industry and governments should collaborate in post-registration surveillance and conducting monitoring studies to determine the fate of pesticides and their health and environmental effects under operational conditions (31).

Article 5. Reducing health and environmental risks

5.1       Governments should:

5.1.1         implement a pesticide policy, and a pesticide registration and control system along the lines set out in Article 6;

5.1.2         regularly review the pesticides marketed in their country, their acceptable uses and their availability to each sector of the public, and conduct special reviews when indicated by scientific evidence;

5.1.3         carry out health surveillance programmes of those who are occupationally exposed to pesticides and investigate, as well as document, poisoning cases;

5.1.4         provide guidance and instructions to health workers, physicians and hospital staff on the diagnosis and treatment of suspected pesticide poisoning as well as on the prevention of exposure and poisoning, and the reporting and recording of incidences;

5.1.5         establish national or regional poisoning information and control centres at strategic locations to provide immediate guidance on first aid and medical treatment, accessible at all times (33);

5.1.6         utilize all possible means for collecting reliable data and maintaining statistics on health effects of pesticides and pesticide poisoning incidents, using harmonized tools where available and submit, where appropriate, the Rotterdam Convention Human Health Incident Report Forms on Severely Hazardous Pesticide Formulations (SHPF), to the relevant designated national authority (34). Suitably trained personnel and adequate resources should be made available to ensure the accuracy of information collected;

5.1.7         provide extension services, agricultural and public health advisory services, farmers and farmers' organizations, pest control operators, public health workers and other entities providing advice on pest and/or vector management with adequate information about practical IPM/IVM strategies and methods, pesticide risk reduction measures, as well as the range of all methods  available for use, including information on risks, hazards and mitigation measures in case of exposure or accident;

5.1.8         with the cooperation of the pesticides industry, limit the availability of pesticides that are sold to the general public through non-specialized outlets, to low hazard products (WHO Class U) or low risk and ready to use products that require no dilution or other preparation, and can be applied with limited need for personal protective equipment;

5.1.9         require that pesticides be physically segregated from other merchandize to prevent contamination or mistaken identity and where appropriate require that pesticides are clearly marked as hazardous materials. Every effort should be made to publicize the dangers of storing pesticides and foodstuffs together;

5.1.10       utilize all possible means for collecting reliable data, maintaining statistics on environmental contamination and adverse effects, and reporting specific incidents related to pesticides. Where appropriate, governments should submit the Rotterdam Convention Environmental Incidents Reporting Forms on Severely Hazardous Pesticide Formulations (SHPF) to the designated national authority (34). Suitably trained personnel and adequate resources should be made available to ensure the accuracy of information collected;

5.1.11       implement a programme to monitor pesticide residues in food, feed, drinking water, the environment and habitations where pesticides have been applied.

5.2       Even where a control scheme is in operation, pesticide industry should:

5.2.1         cooperate in the regular reassessment of the pesticides which are marketed;

5.2.2         provide poison-control centres and medical practitioners with information about pesticide hazards, toxicity of active ingredients and co-formulants and on suitable treatment of pesticide poisoning;

5.2.3         provide users and environmental authorities with information on appropriate remediation measures in case of spills and accidents;

5.2.4         make every reasonable effort to reduce risks posed by pesticides by: 

5.2.4.1         making less toxic formulations available;

5.2.4.2         introducing products in ready-to-use packages;

5.2.4.3         developing application methods and equipment that minimize exposure to pesticides;

5.2.4.4         using returnable and refillable containers where effective container collection systems are in place;

5.2.4.5         using containers that are not attractive for subsequent reuse and promoting programmes to discourage their reuse, where effective container collection systems are not in place;

5.2.4.6         using containers that are not attractive to or easily opened by children, particularly for domestic use products;

5.2.4.7 using clear and concise labelling.

5.2.5         halt sale and recall products as soon as possible when handling or use pose an unacceptable risk under any use directions or restrictions and notify the government.

5.3       Government and industry should cooperate in further reducing risks by:

5.3.1         promoting the use of personal protective equipment which is suitable for the tasks to be carried out, appropriate to the prevailing climatic conditions and affordable (6);

5.3.2         making provisions for safe storage of pesticides at wholesale, retail, warehouse and farm level (26, 27);

5.3.3         establishing services to collect and safely dispose of used containers and small quantities of left-over pesticides (28);

5.3.4         protecting biodiversity and minimizing adverse effects of pesticides on the environment (water, soil and air) and on non-target organisms;

5.3.5         raising awareness and understanding among pesticide users about the importance and ways of protecting health and the environment from the possible adverse effects of pesticides.

5.4       Entities addressed by the Code should consider all available facts and should promote responsible information dissemination on pesticides and their uses, risks and alternatives.

5.5       In establishing pesticide production facilities of a suitable standard in developing countries, manufacturers and governments should cooperate to:

5.5.1         adopt engineering standards and operating practices appropriate to the nature of the manufacturing operations and the hazards involved, and ensure the availability of appropriate protective equipment;

5.5.2         take all necessary precautions to protect workers, bystanders, nearby communities and the environment;

5.5.3         ensure the proper siting of manufacturing and formulating plants as well as their stores and adequately monitor and control wastes, emissions and effluents in accordance with national and regional regulations where available, or in accordance with relevant international guidelines;

5.5.4         maintain quality-assurance procedures to ensure compliance with the relevant standards of purity, performance, stability and safety.

Article 6. Regulatory and technical requirements

 

6.1       Governments should:

6.1.1         introduce the necessary policy and legislation for the regulation of pesticides, their marketing and use throughout their life cycle, and make provisions for its effective coordination and enforcement, including the establishment of appropriate educational, advisory, extension and health-care services, using as a basis FAO and WHO guidelines and, where applicable, the provisions of relevant legally binding instruments. In so doing, governments should take full account of factors such as local needs, social and economic conditions, levels of literacy, climatic conditions, availability and affordability of appropriate pesticide application and personal protective equipment;

6.1.2         as recommended by the International Partnership for Cooperation on Child Labour in Agriculture[64] introduce legislation to prevent the use of pesticides by and sale of pesticides to  children. The use of pesticides by children in a work situation should be included in National Hazardous Work Lists for children under ILO Convention No. 182 on the Worse Forms of Child Labour in countries which have ratified it;

6.1.3         establish regulatory schemes such as licenses or permits for pest control operators;

6.1.4         establish pesticide registration schemes and infrastructures under which each pesticide product is registered before it can be made available for use;

6.1.5 conduct risk evaluations and make risk management decisions based on all relevant available data and information, as part of the pesticide registration process (21, 22);

6.1.6         as part of the registration process establish Good Agricultural Practice in line with the definition of GAP in article 2, for each pesticide that is registered for agricultural use;

6.1.7         use the principles described in the Manual on Development and Use of FAO and WHO Specifications for Pesticides for determining equivalence of pesticides (27);

6.1.8         promote the advantages of, and cooperate with other governments in, the establishment of harmonized (regionally or by groups of countries) pesticide registration requirements, procedures and evaluation criteria, taking into account appropriate, internationally agreed technical guidelines and standards, and where possible incorporate these standards into national or regional legislation (32, 33);

6.1.9         Allow for re-evaluation and establish a re-registration procedure to ensure the regular review of pesticides, thus ensuring that prompt and effective measures can be taken if new information or data on the performance or risks indicate that regulatory action is needed;

6.1.10 improve regulations in relation to collecting and recording data on import, export, manufacture, formulation, quality and quantity of pesticides;

6.1.11 collect and record data on the import, export, manufacture, formulation, quality, quantity and use of pesticides in order to assess the extent of any possible effects on human and animal health and/or the environment, and to monitor trends in pesticide use for economic and other purposes;

6.1.12       permit pesticide application equipment and personal protective equipment to be marketed only if they comply with established standards (5, 8, 9);

6.1.13       detect and control counterfeiting[65] and illegal trade in pesticides through national inter-agency and intergovernmental cooperation and information sharing;

6.1.14  Regulate and monitor pesticide residues in food in accordance notably with the recommendations of the Codex Alimentarius. In the absence of Codex standards, national or regional standards should be used. This should be done in a manner that is consistent with WTO requirements and will not lead to technical barriers in trade.

6.2       Pesticide industry should:


6.2.1         provide an objective assessment together with the necessary supporting data on each product, including sufficient data to support risk assessment and to allow a risk management decision to be made;

6.2.2         provide national regulatory authorities with any new or updated information that could change the regulatory status of the pesticide, as soon as it becomes available;

6.2.3         ensure that the active ingredient and co-formulants of pesticide products being marketed correspond in identity, quality, purity and composition to the ingredients of the registered pesticide product that have been tested, evaluated and cleared for toxicological and environmental acceptability;

6.2.4         ensure that technical grade and formulated pesticide products conform with applicable national standards or FAO recommended specifications for agricultural pesticides, and with WHO recommended specifications for public health pesticides, when available;

6.2.5         verify the quality and purity of pesticides offered for sale;

6.2.6         when problems with pesticides occur, voluntarily take corrective action and, when requested by governments, help find solutions to difficulties;

6.2.7         provide their national governments with clear and concise data on export, import, manufacture, formulation, sales, quality and quantity of pesticides.

6.3       Relevant international organizations and bilateral agencies should be encouraged to give high priority to requests for assistance from developing countries which do not yet have the facilities and expertise for pesticide management and control systems.

Article 7. Availability and use

7.1       Responsible authorities should give special attention to drafting legislation on the availability and use of pesticides. These should be compatible with existing levels of user training and expertise. The parameters on which decisions on the availability and use of pesticides are based vary widely and should be left to the discretion of each government.

7.2       When determining the risk and degree of restriction appropriate to the product, the responsible authority should take into account the type of formulation, method of application and its uses. Governments should, where appropriate, take note of and may consider using the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) or the WHO Recommended Classification of Pesticides by Hazard as the basis for their regulatory measures and associate the hazard class with well-recognized hazard symbols.

7.3       Availability of pesticides may be restricted by the responsible authority in different ways, such as not registering a product or, as a condition of registration, restricting the availability to certain groups of users or certain uses in accordance with a national assessment of the hazards involved in the use of the product.

7.4       Governments and industry should ensure that all pesticides made available to the general public are packaged and labelled in a manner which is consistent with FAO/WHO or other relevant guidelines on packaging and labelling (3) and with appropriate national or regional regulations.

7.5       Prohibition of the importation, distribution, sale and purchase of highly hazardous pesticides may be considered if, based on risk assessment, risk mitigation measures or good marketing practices are insufficient to ensure that the product can be handled without unacceptable risk to humans and the environment.

Article 8. Distribution and trade

8.1       Governments should:

8.1.1         develop legislation and implement licensing procedures relating to the sale of pesticides, so as to ensure that those involved are capable of providing buyers with sound advice on risk reduction, as well as judicious and efficient use;

8.1.2         encourage, to the extent possible, a market-driven supply process, as opposed to government purchasing, to reduce the potential for accumulation of excessive stocks. However, when governments, parastatals, aid programmes or other agencies purchase pesticides, the procurement should be based on FAO and WHO guidance on tender and procurement for pesticides (4, 5);

8.1.3 ensure that any pesticide subsidies or donations do not lead to excessive or unjustified use which may divert interest from more sustainable alternative measures.

8.2       Pesticide industry should:

8.2.1         take all necessary steps to ensure that pesticides traded internationally conform at least to:

8.2.1.1         relevant international conventions and regional, sub-regional or  national regulations;

8.2.1.2         relevant FAO or WHO recommended specifications, where such specifications have been developed;

8.2.1.3         principles embodied in GHS and relevant FAO, and/or WHO guidelines on classification and labelling;

8.2.1.4        rules and regulations on packaging, marking and transportation laid down by the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (46), and by international organizations concerned with specific modes of transport (e.g. ICAO[66], IMO[67], RID[68], ADR[69] and IATA[70]).

8.2.2    ensure that pesticides manufactured for export are subject to the same quality requirements and standards as those applied to comparable domestic products;

8.2.3    ensure that pesticides manufactured or formulated by a subsidiary company meet appropriate quality requirements and standards. These should be consistent with the requirements of the host country and of the parent company;

8.2.4    encourage importing agencies, national or regional formulators and their respective trade organizations to cooperate in order to achieve fair practices as well as marketing and distribution practices that reduce the risks posed by pesticides, and to collaborate with authorities in stamping out any unethical practice within the industry;

8.2.5    recognize that a pesticide may need to be recalled by a manufacturer and distributor when its use, as recommended, represents an unacceptable risk to human and animal health or the environment, and act accordingly;

8.2.6    endeavour to ensure that pesticides are traded by and purchased from reputable traders, who should preferably be members of a recognized trade organization;

8.2.7    ensure that persons involved in the sale of pesticides are trained adequately, hold appropriate government permits or licences (where they exist) and have access to sufficient information, such as safety data sheets, so that they are capable of providing buyers with advice on risk reduction as well as judicious and efficient use;

8.2.8    provide, consistent with national, sub-regional or regional requirements, a range of pack sizes and types that are appropriate for the needs of small-scale farmers, household and other local users, in order to reduce risks and to discourage sellers from repackaging products in unlabelled or inappropriate containers;

8.2.9    not knowingly supply pesticides that are restricted for use by particular groups of users, for sale to unauthorized users.

8.3     Procurers of pesticides should establish purchasing procedures to prevent the oversupply of pesticides and consider including requirements relating to pesticide storage, distribution and disposal services in a purchasing contract (4, 5).

Article 9. Information exchange

9.1       Governments should:

9.1.1    promote the establishment or strengthening of networks for information exchange on pesticides and IPM/IVM through national institutions, international, regional and sub-regional organizations and public interest groups;

9.1.2    facilitate the exchange of information between regulatory and implementing authorities to strengthen cooperation. The information to be exchanged should include:

9.1.2.1    actions taken to ban or severely restrict a pesticide in order to protect human health or the environment, and additional information upon request;

9.1.2.2  scientific, technical, economic, regulatory and legal information concerning pesticides including toxicological, environmental and safety data;

9.1.2.3  the availability of resources and expertise associated with pesticide regulatory activities;

9.1.2.4  cases of counterfeit[71] and illegal pesticides being traded;

9.1.2.5  poisoning and environmental contamination incidents data.

9.2       In addition, governments are encouraged to develop:

9.2.1    legislation that permits public access to information about pesticide risks and the regulatory process, while safe-guarding intellectual property;

9.2.2    administrative procedures to provide transparency and facilitate the participation of the public in the regulatory process, while safe-guarding intellectual property;

9.3       International organizations should, within available resources, provide information on specific pesticides (including guidance on methods of analysis) through the provision of criteria documents, fact sheets, training and other appropriate means.

9.4     All entities addressed by this Code should:

9.4.1    support the process of information exchange and facilitate access to information on matters including pesticide hazards and risks, residues in food, drinking water and the environment, the use of pesticides in or on non-food products, IPM/IVM, pesticide efficacy, alternatives to highly hazardous pesticides and related regulatory and policy actions;

9.4.2    encourage collaboration between public interest  groups, international organizations, governments and other interested stakeholders to ensure that countries are provided with the information they need to meet the objectives of the Code.

Article 10. Labelling, packaging, storage and disposal

10.1     All pesticide containers should be clearly labelled in line with relevant regulations or GHS (45) and/or FAO/WHO guidelines on good labelling practice for pesticides (3)

10.2     Pesticide Industry should use labels that:

10.2.1 comply with registration requirements and include recommendations consistent with those of the relevant authorities in the country of sale;

10.2.2  include appropriate symbols and pictograms whenever possible, with their signal words or hazard and risk phrases, in addition to written instructions, warnings and precautions in the appropriate language or languages;

10.2.3 comply with national labelling requirements or, in the absence of more detailed national standards, with the GHS, the FAO/WHO guidance on pesticide labelling, and other relevant international labelling requirements;

10.2.4    include, in the appropriate language or languages, a warning against the reuse of containers and instructions for decontamination and the safe disposal of used containers;

10.2.5 identify each lot or batch of the product in numbers or letters that can be understood without the need for additional code references;

10.2.6 clearly show the release date (month and year) of the lot or batch (21), expiry date (as appropriate) and contain relevant information on the storage stability of the product.

10.3     Pesticide industry, in cooperation with government, should ensure that:

10.3.1 packaging, storage and disposal of pesticides conform in principle to the relevant FAO, UNEP, WHO guidelines or regulations (34, 35, 47, 49, 50) or to other international guidelines, where applicable;

10.3.2  packaging or repackaging is carried out only on licensed premises that comply with safety standards where the responsible authority is satisfied that staff are adequately protected against toxic hazards, that adequate measures are in place to avoid environmental contamination, that the resulting product will be properly packaged and labelled, and that the content will conform to the relevant quality standards.

10.4     Governments should take the necessary regulatory measures to prohibit the repackaging or decanting of any pesticide into food, beverage, animal feed or other inappropriate containers and rigidly enforce punitive measures that effectively deter such practices.

10.5     Governments, with the help of pesticide industry and with multilateral cooperation, should inventory obsolete or unusable stocks of pesticides and used containers, establish and 23 implement an action plan for their disposal, or remediation in the case of contaminated sites (40), and record these activities.

10.6     Governments should ensure that the treatment and disposal of hazardous pesticide waste are carried out in an environmentally sound manner that complies with national and regional regulations, relevant international standards and Multinational Environmental Agreements, in particular the Basel Convention.

10.7     Pesticide industry should, with multilateral cooperation, assist in disposing of any banned or obsolete pesticides and of used containers, in an environmentally sound manner, including reuse or recycling, with minimal risk where approved and appropriate.

10.8     Governments, pesticide industry, international organizations, the agricultural community and vector control programmes should implement policies and practices to prevent the accumulation of obsolete pesticides and used containers (36).

Article 11.  Advertising

11.1     Governments should approve and implement legislation to regulate the advertising of pesticides in all media to ensure that it is in line with the conditions of registration as regards label directions and precautions, particularly those relating to proper maintenance and use of application equipment, appropriate personal protective equipment, special precautions for vulnerable groups and the dangers of reusing containers (45).

11.2     Pesticide industry should ensure that:

11.2.1 all statements used in advertising are technically justified;

11.2.2 advertisements do not contain any statement or visual presentation which, directly or by implication, omission, ambiguity or exaggerated claim, is likely to mislead the buyer, in particular with regard to the “safety” of the product, its nature, composition or suitability for use, official recognition or approval;

11.2.3 pesticides which are legally restricted to use by trained or registered operators are not publicly advertised through journals other than those catering for such operators, unless the restricted availability is clearly and prominently shown;

11.2.4 no company or individual in any one country simultaneously markets different pesticide active ingredients or combinations of ingredients under a single brand name;

11.2.5 advertising does not encourage uses other than those specified on the approved label;

11.2.6 promotional material does not include recommendations at variance with national regulatory decisions;

11.2.7  advertisements do not misrepresent research results, quotations from technical and scientific literature or scientific jargon to make claims appear to have a scientific basis they do not possess;

11.2.8  claims as to safety, including statements such as "safe", "non-poisonous", "harmless", "non-toxic", "environmentally friendly" or "compatible with IPM/ IVM," are not made on labels, pamphlets or other publicity material, with or without a qualifying phrase such as "when used as directed". [However, reference to use within specified IPM/IVM programmes may be included if validated by the regulating authority, and the claim is qualified accordingly];

11.2.9  statements comparing the risk, hazard or “safety” of different pesticides or other substances are not made;

11.2.10  no misleading statements are made concerning the effectiveness of the product;

11.2.11 no guarantees or implied guarantees, such as "more profits with..." or "guarantees high yields," are given unless definite evidence to substantiate such claims is available;

11.2.12 advertisements do not contain any visual representation of potentially dangerous practices, such as mixing or application without sufficient protective clothing, use near food or use by or in the vicinity of children;

11.2.13 advertising or promotional material draws attention to the appropriate warning phrases and symbols as laid down in the GHS and FAO/WHO labelling guidelines (3);

11.2.14 technical literature provides adequate information on correct practices, including the observance of recommended application rates, frequency of applications and pre-harvest intervals in language that is understandable to end users;

11.2.15 false or misleading comparisons with other pesticides are not made;

11.2.16 all staff involved in sales promotion are adequately trained and possess sufficient technical knowledge to present complete, accurate and valid information on the products offered for sale;

11.2.17 advertisements encourage purchasers and users to read the label carefully, or have the label read to them if they cannot read;

11.2.18 advertisements and promotional activities should not include inappropriate incentives or gifts to encourage the purchase of pesticides.

11.3     International organizations and public interest groups should call attention to departures from this Article.

Article 12. Monitoring and Observance of the Code

12.1     The Code should be published by FAO, WHO and UNEP and should be observed through collaborative action by all entities addressed by this Code.

12.2     The Code should be brought to the attention of all concerned in the regulation, manufacture, distribution and use of pesticides, so that governments, pesticide industry and other entities addressed by this Code that are in a position to promote sustainable pest and vector management practices, understand their shared responsibilities in working together to ensure that the objectives of the Code are achieved.

12.3     All entities addressed by this Code should promote the principles and ethics expressed by the Code, irrespective of other entities' ability to observe the Code. Pesticide industry should cooperate fully in the observance of the Code and promote the principles and ethics expressed by the Code, irrespective of a government's ability to observe the Code.

12.4     Independently of any measures taken with respect to the observance of this Code, all relevant legal rules, whether legislative, administrative, judicial or customary, dealing with liability, consumer protection, conservation, pollution control and other related subjects, should be strictly applied.

12.5     Governments and other entities concerned:

12.5.1  are encouraged to observe the provisions laid down in any relevant international instruments concerning chemical management, environmental and health protection, sustainable development and international trade, relevant to the Code (Annex 1);

12.5.2 are encouraged, if they have not yet joined, ratified or acceded to such instruments, to evaluate the appropriateness of so doing as soon as possible.

12.6     FAO, WHO, UNEP and other relevant international organizations should give full support to the observance of the Code.

12.7     Governments, in collaboration with FAO WHO and UNEP, should monitor the observance of the Code and report on progress made to the Directors-General of FAO and WHO and the Executive Director of UNEP (53).

12.8     Pesticide industry is invited to provide reports to Directors-General of FAO and WHO and the Executive Director of UNEP on its product stewardship activities related to observance of the Code (54).

12.9     NGOs and other interested entities are invited to monitor activities related to the implementation of the Code and report these to Directors-General of FAO and WHO and the Executive Director of UNEP (54).

12.10   Governing Bodies of FAO, WHO and UNEP should periodically review the relevance and effectiveness of the Code. The Code should be considered a dynamic text which must be brought up to date as required, taking into account technical, economic and social progress.

 


Appendix D

Scale of Contributions 2014-2015


(2012-2013 Scale shown for comparative purposes)

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15[72]

%

2012-13[73]

%

Afghanistan

0.005

0.004

Albania

0.010

0.010

Algeria

0.137

0.129

Andorra

0.008

0.007

Angola

0.010

0.010

Antigua and Barbuda

0.002

0.002

Argentina

0.432

0.288

Armenia

0.007

0.005

Australia

2.074

1.942

Austria

0.798

0.855

Azerbaijan

0.040

0.015

Bahamas

0.017

0.018

Bahrain

0.039

0.039

Bangladesh

0.010

0.010

Barbados

0.008

0.008

Belarus

0.056

0.042

Belgium

0.998

1.080

Belize

0.001

0.001

Benin

0.003

0.003

Bhutan

0.001

0.001

Bolivia

0.009

0.007

Bosnia and Herzegovina

0.017

0.014

Botswana

0.017

0.018

Brazil

2.934

1.619

Brunei Darussalam

0.026

0.000

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

Bulgaria

0.047

0.038

Burkina Faso

0.003

0.003

Burundi

0.001

0.001

Cambodia

0.004

0.003

Cameroon

0.012

0.011

Canada

2.985

3.222

Cape Verde

0.001

0.001

Central African Republic

0.001

0.001

Chad

0.002

0.002

Chile

0.334

0.237

China

5.149

3.204

Colombia

0.259

0.145

Comoros

0.001

0.001

Congo

0.005

0.003

Cook Islands

0.001

0.001

Costa Rica

0.038

0.034

Côte d'Ivoire

0.011

0.010

Croatia

0.126

0.098

Cuba

0.069

0.071

Cyprus

0.047

0.046

Czech Republic

0.386

0.351

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

0.006

0.007

Democratic Republic of the Congo

0.003

0.003

Denmark

0.675

0.740

Djibouti

0.001

0.001

Dominica

0.001

0.001

Dominican Republic

0.045

0.042

Ecuador

0.044

0.040

Egypt

0.134

0.095

El Salvador

0.016

0.019

Equatorial Guinea

0.010

0.008

Eritrea

0.001

0.001

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

Estonia

0.040

0.040

Ethiopia

0.010

0.008

Fiji

0.003

0.004

Finland

0.519

0.569

France

5.594

6.152

Gabon

0.020

0.014

Gambia

0.001

0.001

Georgia

0.007

0.006

Germany

7.142

8.056

Ghana

0.014

0.006

Greece

0.638

0.694

Grenada

0.001

0.001

Guatemala

0.027

0.028

Guinea

0.001

0.002

Guinea-Bissau

0.001

0.001

Guyana

0.001

0.001

Haiti

0.003

0.003

Honduras

0.008

0.008

Hungary

0.266

0.292

Iceland

0.027

0.042

India

0.666

0.537

Indonesia

0.346

0.239

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

0.356

0.234

Iraq

0.068

0.020

Ireland

0.418

0.500

Israel

0.396

0.386

Italy

4.449

5.023

Jamaica

0.011

0.014

Japan

10.834

12.590

Jordan

0.022

0.014

Kazakhstan

0.121

0.076

Kenya

0.013

0.012

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

Kiribati

0.001

0.001

Kuwait

0.273

0.264

Kyrgyzstan

0.002

0.001

Lao People's Democratic Republic

0.002

0.001

Latvia

0.047

0.038

Lebanon

0.042

0.033

Lesotho

0.001

0.001

Liberia

0.001

0.001

Libya

0.142

0.130

Lithuania

0.073

0.065

Luxembourg

0.081

0.091

Madagascar

0.003

0.003

Malawi

0.002

0.001

Malaysia

0.281

0.254

Maldives

0.001

0.001

Mali

0.004

0.003

Malta

0.016

0.017

Marshall Islands

0.001

0.001

Mauritania

0.002

0.001

Mauritius

0.013

0.011

Mexico

1.842

2.367

Micronesia (Federated States of)

0.001

0.001

Monaco

0.012

0.003

Mongolia

0.003

0.002

Montenegro

0.005

0.004

Morocco

0.062

0.058

Mozambique

0.003

0.003

Myanmar

0.010

0.006

Namibia

0.010

0.008

Nauru

0.001

0.001

Nepal

0.006

0.006

Netherlands

1.654

1.864

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

New Zealand

0.253

0.274

Nicaragua

0.003

0.003

Niger

0.002

0.002

Nigeria

0.090

0.078

Niue

0.001

0.001

Norway

0.851

0.875

Oman

0.102

0.087

Pakistan

0.085

0.083

Palau

0.001

0.001

Panama

0.026

0.022

Papua New Guinea

0.004

0.002

Paraguay

0.010

0.007

Peru

0.117

0.091

Philippines

0.154

0.091

Poland

0.921

0.832

Portugal

0.474

0.514

Qatar

0.209

0.136

Republic of Korea

1.994

2.271

Republic of Moldova

0.003

0.002

Romania

0.226

0.178

Russian Federation

2.438

1.610

Rwanda

0.002

0.001

Saint Kitts and Nevis

0.001

0.001

Saint Lucia

0.001

0.001

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

0.001

0.001

Samoa

0.001

0.001

San Marino

0.003

0.003

Sao Tome and Principe

0.001

0.001

Saudi Arabia

0.864

0.834

Senegal

0.006

0.006

Serbia

0.040

0.037

Seychelles

0.001

0.002

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

Sierra Leone

0.001

0.001

Singapore

0.384

0.000

Slovakia

0.171

0.143

Slovenia

0.100

0.104

Solomon Islands

0.001

0.001

Somalia

0.001

0.001

South Africa

0.372

0.387

South Sudan

0.004

0.000

Spain

2.973

3.192

Sri Lanka

0.025

0.019

Sudan

0.010

0.010

Suriname

0.004

0.003

Swaziland

0.003

0.003

Sweden

0.960

1.069

Switzerland

1.047

1.135

Syrian Arab Republic

0.036

0.025

Tajikistan

0.003

0.002

Thailand

0.239

0.210

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

0.008

0.007

Timor-Leste

0.002

0.001

Togo

0.001

0.001

Tonga

0.001

0.001

Trinidad and Tobago

0.044

0.044

Tunisia

0.036

0.030

Turkey

1.328

0.620

Turkmenistan

0.019

0.026

Tuvalu

0.001

0.001

Uganda

0.006

0.006

Ukraine

0.099

0.088

United Arab Emirates

0.595

0.393

United Kingdom

5.180

6.636

United Republic of Tanzania

0.009

0.008

 

Proposed Scale

Actual Scale

Member Nation

2014-15

%

2012-13

%

United States of America

22.000

22.000

Uruguay

0.052

0.027

Uzbekistan

0.015

0.010

Vanuatu

0.001

0.001

Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

0.627

0.316

Viet Nam

0.042

0.033

Yemen

0.010

0.010

Zambia

0.006

0.004

Zimbabwe

0.002

0.003

 

 


PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

(July 2013 - June 2015)

Chairperson

 

Members

Ms Cecilia Nordin
   Van Gansberghe (Sweden)

Afghanistan (Mr Abdul Razak Ayazi)
Algeria (Mr Mohamed Mellah)
Argentina (Mr Gustavo Oscar Infante)
Austria (Ms Natalie Feistritzer)
Canada (Mr Eric Robinson)
China (Mr Xia Jingyuan)

Ecuador (Mr José Antonio Carranza)
Ethiopia (Mr Abreha G. Aseffa)
India (Mr Vimlendra Sharan)
New Zealand (Ms Fiona Duncan)
Switzerland (Ms Christina Emma Grieder)
Yemen (Mr Khalid Abdulrahman Al-Akwa)

 

FINANCE COMMITTEE

(July 2013 - June 2015)

Chairperson

 

Members

Mr Médi Moungui
(Cameroon)

Australia (Mr Matthew Worrell)
Brazil (Mr Olyntho Vieira)
Egypt (Mr Magdi Anwar Hassanein Hassan)
Germany (Mr Georg Friedel Cramer)
Guinea (Mr Abdoulaye Traore)
Japan (Mr Hideya Yamada)

Mexico (Ms Emma María José Rodríguez Sifuentes)
Morocco (Mr Fouzi Lekjaa)
Pakistan (Mr Khalid Mehboob)
Russian Federation (Mr Vladimir V. Kuznetsov)
Sudan (Ms Abla Malik Osman)
United States of America (Ms Natalie Brown)

 

COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL MATTERS

(July 2013 - June 2015)

Chairperson

 

Members

Ms Mónica Martínez Menduiño (Ecuador)

Bangladesh (Mr Mafizur Rahman)
Bulgaria (Mr Lubomir Ivanov)
Iraq (Mr Abdulsatar Chiyad Al-Sudani)
Liberia (Mr Mohammed Sheriff)

Papua New Guinea (Mr Lawrence Kuna Kalinoe)
United States of America (Mr Gregory S. Groth)
Uruguay (Mr Oscar Gabriel Piñeyro Bentos)

 

WFP EXECUTIVE BOARD 2013

Term of office expiring

Elected by FAO Council

Elected by ECOSOC

31 December 2013

Cameroon (A)

Canada (D)

Germany (D)

Haiti (C)

Saudi Arabia (B)

South Africa (A)

Australia (D)

Cuba (C)

Morocco (A)

Norway (D)

Republic of Korea (B)

Sudan (A)

 

31 December 2014

Belgium (D)

Brazil (C)

Ghana (A) 1

Slovakia (E)

Sweden (D)

Tunisia (A)

China (B)

Czech Republic (E)

Guatemala (C)

Japan (D)

United Kingdom (D)

Zambia (A)

 

31 December 2015

Afghanistan (B)

Italy (D)

Mexico (C)

Philippines (B)

Uganda (A)

United States of America (D)

Iraq (B)

Netherlands (D)

Russian Federation (E)

Sierra Leone (A)

Switzerland (D)

India (B)

 

1 This seat rotates between lists A, B and C as follows: List A (2012-2014), List B (2015-2017), List A (2018-2020) and List C (2021-2023).


 

FAO MEMBERS

194 Member Nations
2 Associate Members
1 Member Organization

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

Andorra

Angola

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados
Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bhutan

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana

Brazil

Brunei Darussalam

Bulgaria

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Chile

China

Colombia

Comoros

Congo

Cook Islands

Costa Rica

Côte d’Ivoire

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

Egypt

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Ethiopia

European Union

   (Member Organization)

Faroe Islands
   (Associate Member)

Fiji

Finland

France

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Greece

Grenada

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan

Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall Islands

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mexico

Micronesia

   (Federated States of)

Monaco

Mongolia

Montenegro

Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

Namibia

Nauru

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Niue

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Panama

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Qatar

Republic of Korea
Republic of Moldova

Romania

Russian Federation

Rwanda

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Serbia

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Africa

South Sudan

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Swaziland

Sweden

Switzerland

Syrian Arab Republic

Tajikistan

Thailand

The former Yugoslav

   Republic of Macedonia

Timor-Leste

Togo

Tokelau
   (Associate Member)

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Tuvalu

Uganda

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

United Republic of Tanzania

United States of America

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Venezuela

   (Bolivarian Republic of)

Viet Nam

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

 

 



[1] C 2013/INF/11; C 2013/PV/1; C 2013/PV/12

[2] C 2013/INF/7; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[3] C 2013/INF/8; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[4] C 2013/INF/9; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[5] C 2013/INF/10; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[6] C 2013/LIM/7; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[7] C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[8] C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[9] C 2013/12; C 2013/LIM/9; C 2013/PV/1; C 2013/PV/12

[10] C 2013/12; C 2013/LIM/9; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[11] C 2013/1 Rev.1; C 2013/12; C 2013/INF/1 Rev.1; C 2013/INF/4; C 2013/LIM/9; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/12; C 2013/LIM/13 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/22; C 2013/LIM/23 Rev. 1; C 2013/LIM/24; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[12] C 2013/13 Rev.1; C 2013/13 Add.1; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[13] C 2013/2; C 2013/2 Add.1; C 2013/PV/3; C 2013/PV/4; C 2013/PV/5; C 2013/PV/6; C 2013/PV/7; C 2013/PV/8; C 2013/PV/12

[14] C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[15] C 2013/15; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[16] C 2013/17; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[17] C 2013/16; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[18] C 2013/14 Rev.1; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[19] C 2013/18; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[20] C 2013/LIM/1; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[21] C 2013/22; C 2013/INF/6; C 2013/I/PV/2; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[22] C 2013/23; C 2013/INF/6; C 2013/I/PV/2; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[23] C 2013/24; C 2013/INF/6; C 2013/I/PV/2; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[24] C 2013/25; C 2013/INF/6; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[25] C 2013/19; C 2013/20; C 2013/21; C/2013/INF/6; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[26] C 2013/27; C 2013/I/PV/1; C 2013/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[27] C 2013/28; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[28] C 2013/3

[29] C 2013/INF/2; C 2013/INF/3; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[30] C 2013/29; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[31] C 2013/30; C 2013/LIM/3; C 2013/I/PV/3; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[32] C 2013/31; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[33] C 2013/32; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[34] C 2013/33; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[35] C 2013/34; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[36] C 2013/35; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[37] C 2013/36; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[38] C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/LIM/16; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[39] C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/15; C 2013/LIM/17; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/I/PV/4; C 2013/I/PV/5; C 2013/I/PV/6; C 2013/PV/12

[40] C 2013/8; C 2013/8 Corr.1; C 2013/8 Corr.2; C 2013/8 Web Annex; C 2013/LIM/2; C 2013/II/PV/1; C 2013/PV/12

[41] C 2013/4; C 2013/II/PV/1; C 2013/PV/12

[42] C 2013/7; C 2013/LIM/19; C 2013/II/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[43] C 2013/3; C 2013/3 Corr.1 (English only); C 2013/3 Information Notes 1 to 10; C 2013/3 Web Annexes XI and XII; C 2013/LIM/8; C 2013/II/PV/2; C 2013/PV/10; C 2013/PV/12

[44] C 2013/26; C 2013/26 Web Annexes 1 and 2; C 2013/LIM/20; C 2013/II/PV/1; C 2013/II/PV/2; C 2013/PV/12

[45] C 2013/PV/10; C 2013/PV/12

[46] C 2013/LIM/5; C 2013/PV/10; C 2013/PV/12

[47] Deletions are indicated using strike out text and insertions are indicated using underlined italics

[48] C 2013/LIM/6; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/10; C 2013/PV/12

[49] Deletions are indicated using strikethrough text and insertions are indicated using underlined italics.

[50] C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/21; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/10; C 2013/PV/12

[51] Deletions are indicated using strikethrough text and insertions are indicated using underlined italics.

[52] C 2013/5 A; C 2013/5 B; C 2013/LIM/4; C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[53] C 2013/INF/12; C 2013/INF/12 Corr.1 (English only); C 2013/LIM/10 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[54] C 2013/LIM/14; C 2013/LIM/24; C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[55] C 2013/10 Rev.2; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/13 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/7; C 2013/PV/12

[56] C 2013/9; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev. 1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/11; C 2013/PV/12

[57] Basic Texts, Volume II, Section E

[58] C 2013/11; C 2013/LIM/11 Rev.1; C 2013/LIM/13 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/2; C 2013/PV/7; C 2013/PV/11; C 2013/PV/12

[59] C 2013/6; C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[60] C 2013/PV/9; C 2013/PV/12

[61] C 2013/LIM/13 Rev.1; C 2013/PV/7; C 2013/PV/12

[62] During the Special Event the Director-General noted that:

      i.     eight countries are on track to meet the hunger target of MDG-1 by 2015: Bahamas, Chad, China, Ethiopia, Gabon, Rwanda, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; and

    ii.     many developing countries already had a prevalence of undernourishment below 5 percent in 1990 and, for this reason, they deserved to be mentioned: Argentina, Barbados, Dominica, Brunei Darussalam, Egypt, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates.

[63] Numbers in brackets throughout the text refer to the references listed at the end of this document. 

[64] A partnership of : International Labour Organization (ILO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) , International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) , International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers’ Associations (IUF).

[65] As of the time of finalization of the Code of Conduct WHO uses the expression substandard/spurious/falsely-labelled/falsified/counterfeit with regard to medical products.

 

[66] International Civil Aviation Organization.

[67] International Maritime Organization.

[68] Regulations concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by rail.

[69] European Agreement concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by road.

[70] International Air Transport Association.

[71] As of the time of finalization of the Code of Conduct WHO uses the expression substandard/spurious/falsely-labelled/falsified/counterfeit with regard to medical products.

[72] Derived directly from the UN Scale of Assessments for 2013-2015 as adopted by General Assembly Resolution 67/238 of 24 December 2012.

[73] Derived directly from the UN Scale of Assessments for 2010-2012 as adopted by General Assembly Resolution 64/248 of 24 December 2009.