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Meeting Documents

Report of the

TWENTY-THIRD SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE ON FISHERIES

Rome, Italy, 15-19 February 1999

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 1999

PREPARATION OF THIS DOCUMENT

This is the final version of the report as approved by the Twenty-third Session of the Committee on Fisheries.

Distribution:

All FAO Member Nations and Associate Members
Participants at the session
Other interested nations and
international organizations
FAO Fisheries Department
Fishery Officers in FAO Regional Offices

FAO.
Report of the Twenty-third Session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, Italy, 15-19 February 1999.
FAO Fisheries Report. No. 595. Rome, FAO. 1999. 70p.

ABSTRACT

The twenty-third session of the Committee on Fisheries was held from 15 to 19 February 1999. The Committee stressed the increasingly important role of inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in fish production and human nutrition. In this regard, it emphasized the benefits of integrated resources management, the need to combat adverse impacts on the environment and for enhanced cooperation between fishers, government agencies and other stakeholders. It discussed experiences in implementing the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and, while expressing its appreciation for FAO's efforts to promote the application of the Code, recognized that further assistance would be required if meaningful progress was to be made. Commenting favourably on FAO's implementation of the Fisheries Programme over 1996-98, the Committee strongly recommended that Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries) should be allocated a substantially increased share of the Organisation's Regular Programme resources. The Committee adopted International Plans for the Management of Fishing Capacity, for the Management and Conservation of Sharks and for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries. It expressed its support for the FAO Programme of Fisheries Assistance for Small Island States but was concerned at the limited progress achieved in securing funding for the Programme. The Committee approved the report of the Sixth Session of its Sub-Committee on Fish Trade and accepted the invitation to hold the Sub-Committee's next session in Bremen, Germany, in the year 2000. The Committee received the report on the Feasibility of Developing Non-Discriminatory Technical Guidelines for Eco-Labelling of Products from Marine Capture Fisheries held in Rome in October 1998. It noted that any eco-labelling scheme must be, inter alia, transparent, voluntary, non-discriminatory and not be an obstacle to trade but, in the course of lengthy discussions, was unable to reach consensus on FAO's future work on technical aspects of eco-labelling. The Committee considered Version 2.0 of FAO's Strategic Framework (2000-2015) to be a substantial improvement over Version 1.0 but suggested that Version 3.0 should be more concise and less descriptive, with paramount attention given to the requirements of the membership, the Organization's greatest strengths and balance between normative and field activities. Endorsing the Medium-term Perspectives for FAO's Fisheries Programme, the Committee placed high priority on further work in support of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, on implementing the three International Plans of Actions adopted at the session and on activities to support sustainable aquaculture, including the establishment of a COFI Sub-Committee on Aquaculture. The Committee welcomed the steps taken and envisaged to strengthen the functions and responsibilities of FAO regional fishery bodies and their cooperation with Non-FAO regional fishery bodies.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

MATTERS REQUIRING THE ATTENTION OF THE COUNCIL

INTRODUCTION

OPENING OF THE SESSION

ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA AND TIMETABLE

ELECTION OF THE CHAIRPERSON AND VICE-CHAIRPERSONS, AND DESIGNATION OF A DRAFTING COMMITTEE

INTEGRATED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE INLAND FISH PRODUCTION

PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT FOR RESPONSIBLE FISHERIES

REVIEW OF FAO'S PROGRAMMES IN THE FISHERIES SECTOR

MAJOR FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE ISSUES IN SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES (SIDS)

REPORT OF THE SIXTH SESSSION OF THE SUB-COMMITTEE ON FISH TRADE, BREMEN, GERMANY, 3-6 JUNE 1998

FAO STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK (2000-2015)

MEDIUM-TERM PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJOR PROGRAMME 2.3 (FISHERIES)

PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF FAO CONFERENCE RESOLUTION 13/97 (REVIEW OF FAO STATUTORY BODIES)

DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-FOURTH SESSION OF COFI

ANY OTHER MATTERS

ADOPTION OF THE REPORT

Appendix A: Agenda

Appendix B: List of Delegates and Observers

Appendix C: List of Documents

Appendix D: Opening Statement by Mr David A. Harcharik, FAO Deputy Director-General

Appendix E.1: International Plan of Action for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries FAO Deputy Director-General

Appendix E.2: International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks

Appendix E.3: International Plan of Action for the Management of Fishing Capacity




MATTERS REQUIRING THE ATTENTION OF THE COUNCIL

The Committee:

Integrated Resource Management for Sustainable Inland Fish Production

i)    stressed the increasingly important role of inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in fish production and in human nutrition and poverty alleviation in many rural areas. (para.11)

ii)   emphasized the need to combat adverse impacts on the environment and to evaluate and monitor possible environmental risks related to introduction of new or genetically modified species and to devise systems for avoiding growing competition for resources in the sector (recreational versus commercial fishing). (para.11)

iii)  acknowledged that integrated resource management could contribute to the enhancement of inland fish production. (para.14)

iv)   recognized that cooperation between fishers, government agencies and other stakeholders needed to be enhanced when developing general land use plans embracing inland aquatic environments. (para.13)

v)    acknowledged the need to strengthen institutional arrangements to support inland fishery and aquaculture. (para.14)

Progress in the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries

i)    emphasized that the Code is an important basic instrument to facilitate sustainable utilization of global fishery resources and hence to contribute to food security and well-being of people. (para.17)

ii)   recognized that further assistance was required if meaningful progress was to be made towards implementing the Code. (para.19)

iii)  underlined the important role the regional fishery management organizations can play in respect of the issues of fishing capacity and illegal fishing activities in high seas. (para.20)

iv)   underlined the need to clarify and simplify national questionnaires to facilitate reporting on actions to implement the Code and particularly to provide for specific reporting on development of national plans and other actions called for in the three Plans of Action presented for adoption during this session. (para.21)

v)    expressed its appreciation at the establishment of the Margarita Lizárraga award in recognition of her work in developing and encouraging implementation of the Code, in accordance with the FAO Conference Resolution. (para.23)

Review of FAO's Programmes in the Fisheries Sector

i)    commented favourably on FAO's implementation of the Fisheries Programme in the 1996-1998 period, especially the efforts made to assist countries in the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, including its application in conformity with regional specificities. (para.25)

ii)   expressed its satisfaction at the outcome of the First Session of the Advisory Committee on Fisheries Research (ACFR) and on FAO's follow-up actions to its recommendations. (para.26)

iii)  strongly recommended that the Council and the Conference should grant a substantially increased share of FAO's Regular Programme resources to Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries) in view of the number of urgent tasks which the Fisheries Department was being requested to accomplish by FAO's Members. (para.28)

iv)   expressed its appreciation for the work of the Consultation and adopted the International Plan of Action for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries and the International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks. (para.32)

v)    adopted the International Plan of Action for the Management of Fishing Capacity.
(para.34)

vi)   stressed the importance of holding a technical consultation on the measurement of fishing capacity as soon as possible in 1999. (para.36)

vii)  agreed that these Plans of Actions are not intended to regulate trade in fish and fishery products which are governed by relative trade agreements. (para.37)

viii) agreed that the three Plans of Actions should be submitted to the FAO Council for endorsement. (para.38)

Major Fisheries and Aquaculture Issues in Small Island Developing States (SIDS)

i)    commended FAO for its work on responding to the special problem of SIDS and supported the FAO Programme of Assistance for Small Island States. (para.40)

ii)   recognized that further international assistance and cooperation will be needed to develop, manage, and conserve fishery resources in order to increase food security and the standard of living of SIDS. (para.42)

iii)  stressed the importance of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, the Kyoto Plan of Action, the International Coral Reef Initiative and Chapter 17 of Agenda 21 in the development of a relevant policy framework for the sustainable development of the fisheries of SIDS. (para.43)

Report on the Sixth Session of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, Bremen, Germany,
3-6 June 1998

i)    expressed its satisfaction at the work of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade and the important role played by FAO in the field of fish marketing, especially through the fish INFOnetwork. (para.46)

ii)   agreed that further assistance was needed, especially from those countries implementing stringent health related import regulation, in order to build capacity of developing countries in quality control and hazard analysis. (para.47)

iii)  endorsed the report of the consultation of the FAO ad Hoc Expert Group on Listing Criteria for Marine Species under CITES and agreed with its results. (para.48)

iv)   received the report of the Technical Consultation on the Feasibility of Developing Non-Discriminatory Technical Guidelines for the Eco-Labelling of Products from Marine Capture Fisheries which was held in Rome from 21 to 23 October 1998 and expressed thanks to the Nordic Council of Ministers for providing the funding which made the Consultation possible. (para.50)

v)    noted that any eco-labelling scheme must be transparent and not be an obstacle to trade, that it must be voluntary, non-discriminatory, ensure equivalence of standards between countries and/or schemes, recognize the sovereign rights of States and comply with all relevant international agreements. (para.53)

vi)   approved the report of the Sixth Session of its Sub-Committee on Fish Trade and accepted the invitation to hold its Seventh session in Bremen in the year 2000. (para.57)

FAO Strategic Framework (2000-2015)

i)    considered Version 2.0 of the Strategic Framework to be a substantial improvement over Version 1.0, both in presentation and content, but that Version 3.0 should be more concise and less descriptive in order to focus more incisively on strategic issues and better serve its purpose as the framework of FAO's action over a 15-year time horizon. (para.58)

ii)   welcomed the statements of values, mission and vision for the Organization. (para.59)

iii)  fully supported the emphasis given in Part II of the document to inter-disciplinarity and partnerships. (para.60)

iv)   noted that the cross-organizational strategies formed a set of management principles which FAO would apply to the implementation of the programme strategies, and welcomed the addition of the sixth cross-organizational strategy on Communicating FAO's Messages.
(para.63)

v)    welcomed the information provided both in the body of the document and in Annex III, and indicated that Version 3.0 should provide further explanation of how these partnerships were being or would be operationalized. (para.64)

vi)   appreciated the additional explanations provided in Annex II concerning the criteria of priority-setting including that of comparative advantage. (para.65)

vii)  stressed that addressing the effective requirements of the membership, building on the Organisation's greatest strengths and taking into account an appropriate balance between normative and field activities, should continue to be the paramount consideration.
(para.66)

viii)  recalled that a fundamental point of reference for considering the Strategic Framework was a World Food Summit Plan of Action, and the challenges facing countries and the international community to achieve its goals. (para.66)

Medium-Term Perspectives for Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries)

i)    endorsed the Medium-Term Perspectives, but pointed out that it was difficult to formally approve them in the absence of adequate information on the budget. (para.69)

ii)   requested that, in view of the importance of fisheries and aquaculture and the ever-growing demand on its work, the Fisheries Department be allocated an increased share of the overall FAO budget. (para.69)

iii)  agreed that there was a need to prioritize and that demands for important new work to be undertaken implied that the priority of some elements in the existing programme may have to be lowered. (para.70)

iv)   noted the progress in the application of the Kyoto Declaration and Plan of Action and expressed the need to assess better the cultural and socio-economic aspects of fisheries in relation to food security. (para.71)

v)    agreed that greater consideration should be given to the development of more appropriate ecosystem approaches to fisheries development and management, optimally in collaboration with both FAO and non-FAO regional fishery bodies, and to continue its work on the development of sustainability indicators for fisheries. (para.71)

vi)   placed a high level of importance on the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. (para.72)

vii)  urged, as a priority, those countries which had not yet ratified the Compliance Agreement to consider doing so as soon as possible in light of the apparent increase in illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. (para.72)

viii) took note that the issues related to reflagging of fishing vessels and ship registration would be one of the subjects to be discussed by the IMO Sub-Committee on Flag State Implementation. (para.73)

ix)   agreed that improvements were needed in FAO's global monitoring of fish stocks.
(para.74)

x)    expressed its satisfaction at the information provided that the fishing capacity of some long-line and other techniques of some major fishing nations was being reduced and encouraged other States to make similar reductions in capacity as appropriate. (para.75)

xi)   agreed that the three International Plans of Action regarding fishing capacity, sharks and incidental catch of seabirds should be pursued as high priorities. (para.77)

xii)  agreed that FAO's work on the review of CITES listing criteria for commercially harvested fish species should be continued. (para.78)

xiii) agreed that sustainable aquaculture could have high potential in securing food availability and poverty alleviation in developing countries. (para.79)

xiv)  agreed that the above priorities should be reflected in the Programme of Work and Budget 2000-2001. (para.80)

Progress in the Implementation of FAO Conference Resolution 13/97 (Review of FAO Statutory Bodies)

i)    expressed its satisfaction with the outcome of the implementation of the FAO Conference Resolution 13/97. (para.81)

ii)   commended FAO for convening a meeting of FAO and Non FAO Regional Fishery Bodies and Arrangements on 11-12 February 1999 and recommended that such meetings be held regularly, preferably prior to sessions of COFI. (para.82)

iii)  endorsed the recommendation of the Twenty-ninth Session of the FAO Conference to abolish two Sub-Committees of COFI: The Sub-Committee on Programmes to Assist Developing Coastal States in Managing and Developing Fisheries in their Economic Zones and the Sub-Committee on Fishery Education and Training. (para.83)

Any Other Matters

i)    discussed the procedure for the preparations for the Ministerial Meeting on the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. (para.87)

ii)   noted the decision of the Secretariat to set up an open-ended Contact Group consisting of representatives of each regional group, under the Chairmanship of Mr. Ronald Rose, Permanent Representative of Canada to FAO, to undertake the preparations for the Ministerial Meeting. (para.88)

INTRODUCTION

1. The Committee on Fisheries held its Twenty-third Session in Rome from 15 to 19 February 1999.

2. The Session was attended by 98 members of the Committee, by observers from 7 other FAO Member Nations, the Holy See, and one non-Member Nation of FAO, by representatives from two specialized agencies of the United Nations and by observers from 34 other intergovernmental and international non-governmental organizations. A list of delegates and observers is attached at Appendix B.

OPENING OF THE SESSION

3. In the absence of Mr William Martin (USA), outgoing Chairman of the Committee, the Session was opened by the First Vice-Chairman, Mr Mike Akyeampong (Ghana). The delegation of the United States of America read a letter from Mr Martin expressing his regret at being unable to attend the Session and sending his best wishes for the work of the Committee.

4. The Session was addressed by Mr David A. Harcharik, FAO Deputy Director-General. The full text of his statement is attached at Appendix D.

5. Several delegations regretted the late distribution in all languages of important documents to be considered by the Committee.

6. "Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA) 1998". The Fisheries Department was asked to make available to members of the Committee the data base which made it possible to produce the document.

ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA AND TIMETABLE

7. The Agenda adopted by the Committee is attached as Appendix A. The documents which were before the Committee are shown in Appendix C.

ELECTION OF THE CHAIRPERSON AND VICE-CHAIRPERSONS, AND DESIGNATION OF A DRAFTING COMMITTEE

8. Mr Mike Akyeampong (Ghana) was unanimously elected Chairperson of the Committee and Mr Minoru Morimoto (Japan) was elected First Vice-Chairperson. Mr Juan Alberto Arrus Rokovich (Peru), Mr Osman Mohamed Saeed (Sudan), Mr Giuseppe Ambrosio (Italy), Ms Carolyn Risk (New Zealand) and Mr Ronald Rose (Canada) were elected as other Vice-Chairpersons.

9. The Committee also appointed a Drafting Committee consisting of Australia, Brazil, China, Eritrea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Japan, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Thailand and the United States of America.

INTEGRATED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE INLAND FISH PRODUCTION

10. The Secretariat introduced document COFI/99/2, which highlighted the significance of inland fish production for food security and rural development and drew attention to key challenges. The need for integrated resources management (IRM) was stressed and possible measures, policies and instruments of integration for sustainable inland fish production were described.

11. The Committee stressed the increasingly important role of inland capture fisheries and aquaculture in fish production and in human nutrition and poverty alleviation in many rural areas. The Committee also emphasized the need to combat adverse impacts on the environment and evaluate and monitor possible environmental risks related to introduction of new or genetically modified species and to devise systems for avoiding growing competition for resources in the sector (recreational versus commercial fishing). It drew attention to the important roles in this regard of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.

12. The Committee acknowledged that IRM could contribute to the enhancement of inland fish production through integrated aquaculture-agriculture farming systems and integrated utilization of small and medium size water bodies.

13. The Committee recognized that cooperation between fishers, government agencies and other stakeholders needed to be enhanced and that the "polluter pays principle" should be applied to protect fishery resources. A number of countries suggested that experiences in integrated coastal zone management might be useful in the development of general land use plans covering inland aquatic environments.

14. The opportunities for further international cooperation on sustainable aquaculture and inland fisheries were stressed by many countries. In this respect, mention was made of the role of the Commission for Inland Fisheries of Latin America (COPESCAL), activities of the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA) and the FAO/NACA/International Office of Epizootics (OIE) Regional Programme on Fish Quarantine and Health Certification. The Committee recognized the importance of women in aquaculture development and encouraged the sharing of experience between members of different regions. The Committee acknowledged the need to strengthen institutional arrangements to support the inland fishery and aquaculture. Several countries requested FAO to provide further assistance, particularly through the field programme, to support sustainable inland fish production.

15. The Secretariat informed the Committee of its priorities and on-going programme concerning inland fisheries, in particular, cooperation with the FAO Agriculture, Forestry and Sustainable Development Departments.

PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT FOR RESPONSIBLE FISHERIES

16. The Secretariat introduced document COFI/99/3 and invited the Committee to discuss their experiences in implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries at national and regional level and to provide guidance on the information to be requested in the future from governments on their progress and activities in implementation.

17. The Committee emphasized that the Code is an important basic instrument to facilitate sustainable utilization of global fishery resources and hence to contribute to food security and well-being of people. Many countries informed the Committee further on their experiences in implementing the Code.

18. Several countries also reported on problems in implementation and it was suggested by some that progress had been slow. Although some countries reported that they had translated the Code into their national languages, concern was expressed at the need for greater efforts to disseminate the Code to all those involved in fisheries. FAO was asked to assist in this regard through provision of suitable materials and through organizing regional and national workshops. Attention was drawn to the large number of illiterate fishers in many countries and it was suggested that suitable vehicles should be developed, such as audio-visual material, for informing such people of the Code and its objectives.

19. Many countries expressed appreciation to the Fisheries Department of FAO for its role in promoting the application of the Code. Tribute was also paid to the valuable efforts of donor countries in providing technical and financial support to developing countries, both through bilateral arrangements and, through FAO, to assist them in implementation of the Code. However, the Committee recognised that further assistance was required if meaningful progress was to be made towards implementing the Code. Many countries referred to the financial, technological, human resources and frequently geographical constraints they faced. The greatest needs were identified as being in the areas of training, capacity building and institutional strengthening.

20. A number of States reported that they had accepted the Compliance Agreement and/or ratified the UN Agreement on Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks and called on other States to consider doing the same. Concern was expressed at the small number of countries that had accepted/ratified the two Agreements to date. The importance of the Compliance Agreement as a binding instrument to address the problem of vessels that undermined the effectiveness of internationally agreed conservation measures was emphasized. Some delegates suggested that the Compliance Agreement and the Plan of Action on the Management of Fishing Capacity could be supplemented by additional measures to address these fishing activities. The Committee underlined the important role that the regional fishery management organizations can play in respect of the issues of fishing capacity and illegal fishing activities in high seas.

21. The Committee underlined the need to clarify and simplify the national questionnaires to facilitate reporting on actions to implement the Code and particularly to provide for specific reporting on development of national plans and other actions called for in the three Plans of Action presented for adoption during this Session. A working group to address this matter was suggested by some delegations. Noting the involvement of NGOs in the implementation of the Code and their strong support for it, the inclusion of such social and professional organizations in the national reporting process might be needed.

22. Some countries requested that monitoring of implementation of the Code needed to be result-oriented and attempt to determine not just what was being done but also what problems were being encountered and what major constraints and issues remained. The Committee was informed about the results of a recent conference in Australia, organized with FAO on integrated fisheries monitoring, which recommended FAO should undertake the preparation of guidelines for the integrated monitoring of fisheries within the context of the Code.

23. The Committee expressed its appreciation for the establishment of the Margarita Lizárraga award in recognition of her work in developing and encouraging implementation of the Code, in accordance with the FAO Conference Resolution.

REVIEW OF FAO'S PROGRAMMES IN THE FISHERIES SECTOR

Achievements of Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries)

24. The item was introduced on the basis of document COFI/99/5 Part I; the Committee also had at its disposal documents COFI/99/Inf.10, Inf.11, Inf.14 and Inf.18.

25. The Committee commented favourably on FAO’s implementation of the Fisheries Programme in the 1996-1998 period, especially the efforts made to assist countries in the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries including its application in conformity with regional specificities. Several delegations noted with concern the decline in funding for field programme activities.

26. The Committee expressed its satisfaction at the outcome of the First Session of the Advisory Committee on Fisheries Research (ACFR) and of FAO’s follow-up actions to its recommendations. Discussion by the Committee clarified the role of ACFR as an independent body to advise on FAO’s fishery research programmes and not to provide general fishery policy recommendations.

27. In response to queries by several delegations, the Secretariat explained that the apparent under-spending of appropriations to the Fisheries Department in the biennium 1996/97 was caused by the organization-wide policy of not filling vacancies on a temporary basis in order to accommodate a short fall in real budgetary resources. In terms of effective allocations provided, expenditures on the fisheries programme were in near balance.

28. The Committee strongly recommended that the Council and the Conference should grant a substantially increased share of FAO’s Regular Programme resources to Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries) in view of the number of urgent tasks which the Fisheries Department was being requested to accomplish by FAO’s Members. Because of the constraints upon funds, it stressed the need for careful prioritization of activities.

29. Some delegations insisted on the need for the work of the Fisheries Department to be financed with resources from the Regular Programme and not be based mainly on extra-budgetary funds.

Follow-Up to the Requests and Recommendations of the Twenty-Second Session of COFI

30. This sub-item was presented by the Secretariat on the basis of document COFI/99/5 Part II, Rev.1.

The Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries

31. This item was introduced by the Secretariat on the basis of document COFI/99/5 Part III. It was decided to postpone discussion of Part IV to Agenda Item 10. The outcome of the Consultation on the Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries, held in Rome in October 1998, was described, with special reference to the three drafts approved by the Consultation for consideration by COFI. One of the drafts had several bracketed phrases indicating the lack of agreement by the Consultation.

32. The Committee expressed its appreciation for the work of the Consultation and adopted:

33. Concerning the management of fishing capacity, the Committee welcomed the results of the Consultation. It agreed that the draft should be entitled "Plan of Action" rather than "Guidelines".

34. The Committee then adopted the International Plan of Action for the Management of Fishing Capacity as presented in Annex G of document COFI/99/5 Part III, with the following clarifications with regard to timeframes:

35. The texts of the three above-mentioned Plans of Action will be published by the FAO Fisheries Department.

36. The Committee stressed the importance of holding a technical consultation on the measurement of fishing capacity as soon as possible in 1999. The need to develop simple methods that could be widely applicable in both developed and developing countries was strongly emphasized.

37. The Committee agreed that these Plans of Action are not intended to regulate trade in fish and fishery products which are governed by relative trade agreements.

38. The Committee agreed that the three Plans of Action should be submitted to the FAO Council for endorsement.

MAJOR FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE ISSUES IN SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES (SIDS)

39. The Secretariat introduced document COFI/99/7 highlighting the special characteristics of SIDS and emphasizing the importance to them of often vulnerable fishery resources for employment, food and generation of foreign exchange.

40. The Committee commended FAO for its work on responding to the special problems of SIDS and supported the FAO Programme of Fisheries Assistance for Small Island States as outlined in document COFI/99/7. However, while gratefully acknowledging the help given by a number of bilateral donors, concern was expressed that there had not been much progress in securing funding for the Programme.

41. Several delegations requested that aspects of this Programme be considered for funding under the FAO Regular Programme. The Secretariat responded that a number of relevant activities were already being pursued under the Regular Programme, in response to countries or regional organizations, e.g., stock assessment, training in stock assessment, assistance to the Organization for Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) in formulating fishery legislation, assistance on disaster preparedness, workshops on economic planning and marine resource assessment. It stressed, however, that the resources of the Regular Programme did not allow it to undertake all the activities of the Programme itself.

42. The Committee recognized that further international assistance and cooperation will be needed to develop, manage, and conserve fishery resources in order to increase food security and the standard of living of SIDS. Aims of this assistance include, inter alia, diversification of socio-economic opportunities, conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, enterprise development, capacity building, and aquaculture. A number of delegates recommended that an integrated approach addressing all aspects of the development of both capture fisheries and aquaculture in SIDS including public and other sectors should be pursued.

43. The Committee stressed the importance of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the Kyoto Plan of Action, the International Coral Reef Initiative and Chapter 17 of Agenda 21 in the development of a relevant policy framework for sustainable development of the fisheries of SIDS.

44. Some delegates pointed to the value of the participation and cooperation of SIDS in international fora such as the Indian Ocean Tuna Commision (IOTC) and the Conference on the Conservation and Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western and Central Pacific. Some delegations pointed out the importance of closer collaboration among UN Specialized Agencies and the international donor community to provide assistance to regional indigenous organizations to assist with the implementation of the SIDS Plan of Action. Other delegations suggested that international NGOs could make a useful contribution by collaborating with local NGOs working in SIDS.

REPORT OF THE SIXTH SESSION OF THE SUB-COMMITTEE ON FISH TRADE, BREMEN, GERMANY, 3-6 JUNE 1998

45. This item was introduced by the Chairman of the Sub-Committee and discussed on the basis of document COFI/99/6 and COFI/99/6 Sup.1. The Committee also had at its disposal documents COFI/99/Inf. 13 and COFI/99/Inf. 16 Part I and Part II.

46. The Committee expressed its satisfaction at the work of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade and the important role played by FAO in the field of fish marketing information, especially through the FISH INFOnetwork, i.e., the network comprising the regional fish market information services: INFOFISH (Asia and Pacific Islands), INFOPECHE (Africa), INFOPESCA (Latin America and Caribbean), INFOSAMAK (Arab countries), INFOYU (China), EASTFISH (Central and Eastern Europe) and the global FAO network, GLOBEFISH.

47. Many developing countries underlined their concern that changes in the health measures in importing countries could become non-tariff barriers to trade. Other delegations, however, were of the opinion that these measures should be considered as provisions of product safety intended to protect consumers’ health. The Committee agreed that further assistance was needed, especially from those countries implementing stringent health related import regulations, in order to build capacity of developing countries in quality control and hazard analysis.

48. The Committee endorsed the report of the consultation of the FAO Ad hoc Expert Group on Listing Criteria for Marine Species under CITES and agreed with its results. As regards the timing of its proposed work, it was indicated that it was necessary to inform in a preliminary fashion the Eleventh Session of the Conference of Parties to CITES of this work. Some delegations expressed the view that in reviewing the CITES listing criteria, FAO should take due account of the relevant provisions of UNCLOS relating to living marine resources.

49. Some delegations stated that FAO should carry out further work on collecting information on subsidies. Other delegations suggested that FAO should undertake further work on this issue beyond the compilation of information. The Committee was informed that the OECD Committee on Fisheries is also undertaking work on financial transfers to fisheries.

50. The Committee received the report of the Technical Consultation on the Feasibility of Developing Non-discriminatory Technical Guidelines for Eco-labelling of Products from Marine Capture Fisheries which was held in Rome from 21 to 23 October 1998, and expressed thanks to the Nordic Council of Ministers for providing the funding which made the Consultation possible.

51. Various delegations stressed that the Consultation did not reach an agreement regarding the practicability and feasibility of FAO drafting technical guidelines for the eco-labelling of produce from marine capture fisheries. Having noted this, most delegations identified FAO as an appropriate international organization to discuss technical criteria for eco-labelling schemes.

52. It was agreed that the issue of eco-labelling could have significant implications for the fishery sectors of member nations.

53. Most delegations endorsed the consensus expressed in paragraph 11 of the report of the Technical Consultation that if an agreement was eventually reached as to the feasibility of elaborating guidelines for eco-labelling, it should be consistent with the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, and cited the requirements of Articles 11.1, 11.2 and 11.3 of the Code of Conduct, which discuss responsible post-harvest utilization, trade and regulations concerning fishery products. The Committee noted that any eco-labelling scheme must be transparent and not be an obstacle to trade, that it must be voluntary, non-discriminatory, ensure equivalence of standards between countries and/or schemes, recognize the sovereign rights of States, and comply with all relevant international agreements.

54. Most delegations recommended that FAO should initiate further work on elaborating technical aspects of eco-labelling during the current and future biennia, subject to availability of resources. This work should include a review of what the WTO and other relevant international organizations are already doing.

55. Other delegations, however, felt that FAO should not get involved in the issue and should leave it to the other specialist bodies.

56. Some delegations also called upon FAO to convene a second open technical consultation on eco-labelling, in accordance with the rules of FAO governing such consultations and called upon the Secretariat to prepare relevant Terms of Reference in consultation with Member States.

57. The Committee approved the report of the Sixth Session of its Sub-Committee on Fish Trade and accepted the invitation to hold the Seventh Session of the Sub-Committee in conjunction with the Seafood Fair to be held in Bremen, Germany, in the year 2000.

FAO STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK (2000-2015)

58. The Committee considered Version 2.0 of the Strategic Framework to be a substantial improvement over Version 1.0, both in presentation and content. It considered nonetheless that Version 3.0 should be more concise and less descriptive, in order to focus more incisively on strategic issues and better serve its purpose as the framework for FAO's action over a 15-year time horizon. Some Members considered that an Executive Summary would be a valuable addition.

59. With regard to Part I of the document, the Committee welcomed the statements of values, mission and vision for the Organization. It was suggested that the mission statement could be more crisply formulated, perhaps including a summary statement of the major objectives. With regard to values, several delegations proposed that a clear reference to respect for human rights, and in particular the right to adequate food as a human right, should be included.

60. In considering Part II, Corporate Strategies, the Committee fully supported the emphasis given, throughout, to inter-disciplinarity and partnerships. The additional information provided in Version 2.0 on each of the proposed strategies was appreciated, in particular as it permitted a clearer identification of the contribution of fisheries programmes to the broader effort

61. The Committee's consideration of the strategies to address Members' needs focused, inter alia, on the importance of the contribution of fisheries and environmentally sound and sustainable aquaculture to the achievement of food security. Many Members referred to specific areas identified in the WFS Plan of Action which required action by the international community and in particular by FAO, in view of its clear mandate for the conservation and management of capture fisheries and aquaculture and its range of expertise in these areas.

62. During the discussion, Members provided specific suggestions for changes, improvements and ways of sharpening the focus of the fisheries components of individual strategies. Fisheries was seen as one of the areas of overall comparative advantage for FAO, and stress was placed on FAO's role in capacity building to enable countries and regional fishery management bodies to participate fully in the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and other fisheries instruments.

63. The Committee noted that the cross-organizational strategies formed a set of management principles which FAO would apply to the implementation of the programme strategies, and welcomed the addition of the sixth cross-organizational strategy on Communicating FAO's Messages. Support was also expressed for the strategy devoted to Leveraging Resources for FAO and its Members, to ensure effective implementation of the Strategic Framework once adopted.

64. With regard to partnerships and alliances, the Committee welcomed the information provided both in the body of the document and in Annex III, and indicated that Version 3.0 should provide further explanation of how these partnerships were being or would be operationalized. It was suggested that the areas in which FAO would expect to play a lead role should be reviewed as part of this process, and that partnerships with specific UN organizations should be indicated. In this connection, some Members stressed the importance of FAO to engage in the current UN reform process for work being carried out at the national level, inter alia through the UN Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs), and of maximum synergy between the Rome-based agencies. Other countries commended the structural reforms instituted by FAO since 1994.

65. The synergistic effect of cooperation with other actors was also considered to be an important criterion for priority-setting. The Committee appreciated the additional explanations provided in Annex II concerning such criteria, including that of comparative advantage. Some Members expressed the view that these criteria should be part of the Strategic Framework and be further developed in order for the document to serve as a basis for establishing the Medium-Term Plan and the Programme of Work and Budget.

66. The Committee stressed that addressing the effective requirements of the membership, building on the Organization's greatest strengths and taking into account an appropriate balance between normative and field activities, should continue to be the paramount consideration. In concluding, it recalled that a fundamental point of reference for considering the Strategic Framework was a World Food Summit Plan of Action, and the challenge facing countries and the international community to achieve its goals.

MEDIUM-TERM PERSPECTIVES FOR MAJOR PROGRAMME 2.3 (FISHERIES)

67. The Secretariat introduced the Medium-term Perspectives for Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries) on the basis of documents COFI/99/8, COFI/99/5 Part IV, Inf.6, Inf.10, Inf.11, Inf.12 and Inf.15.

68. During the discussion of these documents, members provided specific suggestions for changes and improvements. The Secretariat explained that all points raised in Plenary would be properly taken into consideration when revising them.

69. The Committee endorsed the Medium-term Perspectives, but pointed out that it was difficult to formally approve them in the absence of adequate information on the budget. In response to regrets by several delegations, the Secretariat explained that the unavailability of the Programme of Work and Budget for 2000-2001 was caused by time constraints created by the preparation of the Strategic Framework. It was, however, clear that given the range and complexity of the programme described, the current level of regular budget allocation would not be sufficient. The Committee requested that, in view of the importance of fisheries and aquaculture and the ever-growing demand on its work, the Fisheries Department be allocated an increased share of the overall FAO budget.

70. The Committee agreed that there was a need to prioritize and that demands for important new work to be undertaken implied that the priority of some elements in the existing programme may have to be lowered.

71. The Committee noted the progress in the application of the Kyoto Declaration and Plan of Action and expressed the need to assess better the cultural and socio-economic aspects of fisheries in relation to food security. The Committee agreed that greater consideration should be given to the development of more appropriate ecosystem approaches to fisheries development and management, optimally in collaboration with both FAO and non-FAO regional fishery bodies, and to continue its work on the development of sustainability indicators for fisheries.

72. The Committee placed a high level of importance on the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The Committee was concerned about information presented indicating increases in illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, including fishing vessels flying "flags of convenience". The Committee urged, as a priority, those countries which had not yet ratified the Compliance Agreement to consider doing so as soon as possible. It was generally agreed that pending the entering into force of the Agreement, additional steps might need to be considered and that FAO should undertake work in this regard. Several delegations urged that FAO convene a meeting of experts to identify suitable measures, followed by a technical consultation that would report to the Twenty-fourth Session of the Committee. Before convening such a meeting, FAO should review the activities that had been undertaken by regional fishery management organizations to deal with these problems. It was emphasized that due account should be taken of the rights and obligations of States under international law.

73. The Committee took note that the issues related to reflagging of fishing vessels and ship registration would be one of the subjects to be discussed by the IMO Sub-Committee on Flag State Implementation. It was suggested that FAO inform IMO of the importance the Committee ascribed to the issue in time for the meeting in March 1999.

74. The Committee agreed that improvements were needed in FAO’s global monitoring of fish stocks.

75. The Committee expressed its satisfaction at the information provided that the fishing capacity of some long-line and other techniques of some major fishing nations was being reduced and encouraged other States to make similar reductions in capacity as appropriate.

76. A number of priorities in relation to the Code of Conduct were agreed, including the need to carry out research and develop sustainable technologies and practices, to develop indicators of sustainability and to promote the further reduction of wastage in fisheries. FAO was also requested to sustain its assistance to enable developing countries to meet the safety requirement for fish products of importing countries.

77. Implementation of the three International Plans of Action, just adopted for the Management of Fishing Capacity, Conservation and Management of Sharks and for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries should be pursued as high priority.

78. The Committee agreed that FAO’s work on the review of CITES listing criteria for commercially harvested fish species should be continued.

79. The Committee agreed that sustainable aquaculture could have high potential in securing food availability and poverty alleviation in developing countries. There was broad support in the Committee to the proposal to establish a COFI sub-committee on aquaculture. Noting that extra-budgetary funds for such a body had not yet been identified, suggestion was made that consideration be given to funding such a sub-committee from Regular Programme resources.

80. The Committee agreed that the above priorities should be reflected in the Programme of Work and Budget 2000-2001.

PROGRESS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF FAO CONFERENCE RESOLUTION 13/97 (REVIEW OF FAO STATUTORY BODIES)

81. The Committee expressed its satisfaction with the outcome of the implementation of the FAO Conference Resolution 13/97 as documented in COFI/99/4. It noted that eight of the nine FAO regional fishery bodies (RFBs) had already considered actions to strengthen their functions and responsibilities. It urged FAO to continue the systematic analysis of these bodies, especially concerning their institutional and financial arrangements, the strategies used to implement decisions and the recommendations and measures taken to address current international fishery issues.

82. The Committee commended FAO for convening a meeting of FAO and Non-FAO Regional Fishery Bodies or Arrangements on 11 and 12 February 1999 and recommended that such meetings be held on a regular basis, preferably prior to regular sessions of COFI.

83. Furthermore, the Committee endorsed the recommendation of the Twenty-ninth Session of the FAO Conference to abolish two Sub-Committees of COFI: the Sub-Committee on Programmes to Assist Developing Coastal States in Managing and Developing Fisheries in their Economic Zones and the Sub-Committee on Fishery Education and Training. The Committee also noted the abolition of the Regional Fisheries Advisory Commission for the Southwest Atlantic (CARPAS).

84. The Committee was also informed that at a meeting of the Indian Ocean Fishery Commission (IOFC) held on 17 February 1999, the members of the Commission recommended that the IOFC be abolished.

85. One delegation informed the Committee of the decision of some interested countries to establish a regional fishery organization for the management of fish stocks in the South-east Atlantic, corresponding to FAO Statistical Division Area 47.

DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-FOURTH SESSION OF COFI

86. It was agreed that the Committee should meet in Rome in 2001. The exact date would be determined by the Director-General in consultation with the Chairman.

ANY OTHER MATTERS

87. The Committee discussed the procedure for the preparations for the Ministerial Meeting on the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries to be held on 10 and 11 March 1999 in Rome.

88. The Committee noted the decision of the Secretariat to set up an open-ended Contact Group consisting of representatives of each regional group, under the Chairmanship of Mr Ronald Rose, Permanent Representative of Canada to FAO, to undertake preparations for the Ministerial Meeting. Some delegations strongly expressed the view that the Contact Group should not serve as a drafting committee for the Ministerial Meeting.

ADOPTION OF THE REPORT

89. The report was adopted on 19 February 1999.



APPENDIX A

Agenda

1. Opening of the Session

2. Adoption of the Agenda and Timetable

3. Election of the Chairperson and Vice-Chairpersons, and designation of a Drafting Committee

4. Integrated resource management for sustainable inland fish production

5. Progress in the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries

6. Review of FAO’s programmes in the fisheries sector

7. Major fisheries and aquaculture issues in small island developing States (SIDS)

8. Report of the Sixth Session of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, Bremen, Germany, 3-6 June 1998

9. FAO Strategic Framework (2000-2015)

10. Medium-Term Perspectives for Major Programme 2.3 (Fisheries)

11. Progress in the implementation of FAO Conference Resolution 13/97 (Review of FAO statutory bodies)

12. Date and place of the Twenty-fourth Session of COFI

13. Any other matters

14. Adoption of the Report



APPENDIX B

List of Delegates and Observers

MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE

ALBANIA

ALGERIA

Hariba YAHIA-CHERIF (Mme)
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République algérienne démocratique et
populaire auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République algérienne
démocratique et populaire
Via Barnaba Oriani 26
00197 Rome
Italie

Mohamed Salah SMATI
Directeur
Ministère de l'agriculture et de la pêche
12, Boulevard Amirouche
Alger

ANGOLA

Antero A. E. ABREU
Représentant permanent de la République
d’Angola auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République d’Angola
Via Filippo Bernardini 21
00165 Rome
Italie

Kiala Kia MATEVA
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République d’Angola auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République d’Angola
Via Filippo Bernardini 21
00165 Rome
Italie

Eurico PAZ-COSTA
Directeur de Cabinet juridique
Ministère des pêches
Av. 4 de Fevereiro, CP 83
Luanda

Constâncja SANTOS (Mme)
Directeur de Cabinet
Ministère des pêches
Av. 4 de Fevereiro
CP 83
Luanda

Carlos AMARAL
Représentant permanent suppléant de la
République d’Angola auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République d’Angola
Via Filippo Bernardini, 21
Rome
Italie

ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

Joseph DAVEN
Coordinator of Planning
Ministry of Planning
Cross Street
St. John’s

ARGENTINA

Ariel FERNÁNDEZ
Representante Permanente Alterno
Representación Permanente de la
República Argentina ante la FAO
Via del Banco di S. Spirito 42 - IV piso
00186 Roma
Italia

Enrique MIZRAHI
Jefe de Gabinete
Subsecretario de Pesca
Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería,
Pesca y Alimentación
Paseo Colón 982
Buenos Aires

AUSTRALIA

Glenn HURRY
Assistant Secretary
Fisheries and Aquaculture Branch
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and
Forestry
GPO Box 858
Canberra ACT 2601

Paul ROSS
Counsellor
Agriculture
Embassy of Australia
Via Alessandria 215
00198 Rome
Italy

AUSTRIA

Günther SCHLÖGL
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Bundesministerium für Land und
Forstwirtschaft
Stubenring 1
1012 Vienna

Ernst ZIMMERL
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Republic
of Austria to FAO
Via Giovanni Battista Pergolesi 3
00198 Rome
Italy

BANGLADESH

BARBADOS

Patrick McCONNEY
Chief Fisheries Officer
Ministry of Agriculture and
Rural Development
Graeme Hall, Christ Church
PO Box 505
Bridgetown

BELGIUM

Luc MAERTENS
Director
Ministry of Agriculture
Vrijhavenstraat, 5
8400 Ostend

BENIN

Joseph OUAKE
Directeur des pêches
Ministère du développement rural
Cotonou

BRAZIL

Júlio C. GOMES DOS SANTOS
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Federative Republic of Brazil to FAO
Via di Santa Maria dell'Anima 32
00186 Rome
Italy

José Roberto DE ALMEIDA PINTO
Deputy Permanent Representative Permanent
Representation of the Federative Republic of
Brazil to FAO
Via di Santa Maria dell'Anima 32
00186 Rome
Italy

Gabriel CALZAVARA DE ARAÚJO
Director General of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Food Supply
Esplanada dos Ministérios, Block D
70043-900 Brasilia, D.F.

Fabio HAZIN
Ministry of Agriculture
c/o Brazilian Embassy
Piazza Navona 14
Rome
Italy

João Mauricio CABRAL DE MELLO
Second Secretary
Ministry of External Relations
c/o Brazilian Embassy
Piazza Navona 14
Rome
Italy

BURKINA FASO

Béatrice DAMIBA (Mme)
Représentant permanent du Burkina Faso
auprès de la FAO
Ambassade du Burkina Faso
Via Alessandria 26
00198 Rome
Italie

André Anatole YAMEOGO
Représentant permanent adjoint du
Burkina Faso auprès de la FAO
Ambassade du Burkina Faso
Via Alessandria 26
00198 Rome
Italie

CAMEROON

Jean-Calvin NJOCK
Directeur des pêches
Ministère de l'élevage, des pêches et des
industries animales
Yaoundé

J. Jacques Raymond Sanzhié BOKALLY
Secrétaire exécutif de la caisse de
développement de la pêche maritime
Ministère de l'élevage, des pêches et des
industries animales
Yaoundé

CANADA

David BALFOUR
Director-General
Fisheries Management
Fisheries and Oceans Department
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A OE6

Ronald ROSE
Deputy Permanent Representative
of Canada to FAO
Canadian Embassy
Via Zara, 30
00198 Rome
Italy

Sylvain SEGARD
A/Director
Fisheries and Oceans Department
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A OE6

Lennox O’RILEY HINDS
Senior Oceans, Marine Affairs and
Fisheries Advisor
Canadian International Development Agency
200 Promenade du Portage
Hull, Quebec

CAPE VERDE

Eduardo SILVA
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République du Cap-Vert auprès de la
FAO
Ambassade de la République du Cap-Vert
Via Giosuè Carducci 4, Int. 3
00187 Rome
Italie

CHAD

CHILE

Juan Manuel CRUZ
Subsecretario de Pesca
Ministerio de Economía
Santiago

Victor Manuel REBOLLEDO GONZÁLEZ
Embajador ante la FAO

Representante Permanente
Representación Permanente de la
República de Chile ante la FAO
Via Po 23
00198 Roma
Italia

Juan RUSQUE
Director Nacional de Pesca
Servicio Nacional de Pesca
Santiago

CHINA

Wang YANLIANG
Deputy Director-General
Bureau of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
11 Nongzhanguan Nanli
Beijing 100026

Qing LIU
Deputy Director of Aquaculture Division
Bureau of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
11 Nongzhanguan Nanli
Beijing 100026

Qianfei LIU
Programme Director of Fishery Introduction
National Fishery Technique Dissemination
Bureau of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
11 Nongzhanguan Nanli
Beijing 100026

Tang SHENGYAO
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the People's
Republic of China to FAO
Via della Caffarella 9
00179 Rome
Italy

COLOMBIA

Bernardo G. ZULUAGA BOTERO
Representante Permanente Alterno
Representación Permanente de la
República de Colombia ante la FAO
Via Giuseppe Pisanelli 4, int. 5
00196 Roma
Italia

CONGO, REPUBLIC OF THE

Bernard MANKENE
Directeur général de la pêche et des
ressources halieutiques
Ministère de l’économie forestière chargé
de la pêche et des ressources halieutiques
BP 1650 Brazzaville

COSTA RICA

Victoria GUARDIA (Sra)
Embajador ante la FAO

Representante Permanente
Representación Permanente de la
República de Costa Rica ante la FAO
Via Bartolomeo Eustachio 22
00161 Roma
Italia

Yolanda GAGO (Sra)
Representante Permanente Alterno
Representación Permanente de la
República de Costa Rica ante la FAO
Via Bartolomeo Eustachio 22
00161 Roma
Italia

CÔTE D'IVOIRE

Emmanuel Kouassi NOUAMA
Représentant permanent de la République
de Côte d’Ivoire auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République de Côte
d’Ivoire
Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 4-6
00161 Rome
Italie

CUBA

Juan NUIRY SÁNCHEZ
Embajador ante la FAO
Representación Permanente de la República de
Cuba ante la FAO
Via Licinia 13a
00153 Roma
Italia

María Cristina LEYVA FELICIANO (Sra)
Functionaria Dirección Asuntos
Internacionales y Jurídicos
Ministerio de la Industria Pesquera
5ta Ave, 248, Jaimanitas, Barlovento
Playa
La Habana

CYPRUS

Andreas ROUSHIAS
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Republic
of Cyprus to FAO
Piazza Farnese 44
00186 Rome
Italy

CZECH REPUBLIC

Jiri NOVÁK
Permanent Representative of the Czech
Republic to FAO
Embassy of the Czech Republic
Via dei Gracchi 322
00192 Rome
Italy

DENMARK

Sally CLINK (Ms)
Head of Section
Ministry for Food, Agriculture and Fisheries
Holbergsgade 2
DK 1057 Copenhagen

Andras KRITIANSEN
Head of Section
Ministry of Fisheries
P.O. Box 64
FO 100 Torshavn
Faroe Islands

Eydfinnur FINNSSONN
Head of Section
Fisheries Department
Faroe Islands Home Rule Government

Jeanineke DAHL KRISTENSEN (Ms)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Asiatisk Plads 2
1448 Copenhagen K

DOMINICA

Nigel LAWRENCE
Fisheries Advisor
Ministry of Agriculture and the Environment
Fisheries Complex, M.E. Charles Blvd.
Roseau

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Juan BORG GIL
Representante Permanente Alterno de la
República Dominicana ante la FAO
Embajada de la República Dominicana
Via Domenico Chelini 10
00197 Roma
Italia

ECUADOR

Carlos LARREA DÁVILA
Representante Permanente Alterno de la
República del Ecuador ante la FAO
Embajada de la República del Ecuador
Via Guido d’Arezzo 14
00198 Roma
Italia

EGYPT

Mohammed KHALIFA
Deputy Permanent Representative of the
Arab Republic of Egypt to FAO
Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt
Via Salaria 267 (Villa Savoia)
00199 Rome
Italy

EL SALVADOR

Eduardo VIDES
Ministro Consejero
Embajada de El Salvador ante la Santa Sede
V. Panama 22 Int. 2, 00198 Roma
Italia

ERITREA

Yohannes TENSUE
Alternate Permanent Representative of
Eritrea to FAO
Embassy of Eritrea
Via Boncompagni 16
00187 Rome
Italy

ESTONIA

Lauri VAARJA
Director-General
Estonian Fisheries Board
Ministry of Environment
Kopli 12
Tallinn

Elena ASKERSTAM (Ms)
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Republic
of Estonia to FAO
Via dei Corazzieri 94
00143 Rome
Italy

ETHIOPIA

EUROPEAN COMMUNITY
(Member Organization)

Serge BESLIER
Chef d'Unité
Direction générale de pêche
(DG XIV - B1)
Commission des Communautés européennes
200 rue de la Loi
B-1049 Bruxelles
Belgique

Carmen OCHOA DE MICHELENA (Mme)
Administrateur
Direction générale de pêche (DG XIV - B1)
Commission des Communautés européennes
200 rue de la Loi
B-1049 Bruxelles
Belgique

Cornelia NAUEN (Mme)
Senior Fisheries Cooperation Officer
(DG. VIII)
Commission des Communautés européennes
200 rue de la Loi
B-1049 Bruxelles
Belgique

Andrew BYRNE
Représentant permanent suppléant
Délégation de la Commission des
Communautés européennes auprès de la FAO
Via IV Novembre 149
00187 Rome
Italie

Frances-Anne HUNTER (Ms)
Attaché
Délégation de la Commission des
Communautés européennes auprès de la FAO
Via IV Novembre 149
00187 Rome
Italie

Fernando FLORINDO
Administrateur
Conseil de l’Union européenne
175 rue de la Loi
B-1049 Bruxelles
Belgique

FIJI

FINLAND

Seppo HAVU
Director General
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
P.O. Box 232
00171 Helsinki

Jarmo VILHUNEN
Counsellor of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
P.O. Box 232
00171 Helsinki

Juhani ROUHIAINEN
Counsellor (Agriculture)
Embassy of the Republic of Finland
Via Lisbona 3
00198 Rome
Italy

FRANCE

Jean-Michel SUCHE
Chef du bureau ressource, réglementation
et affaires internationales
Direction des pêches maritimes et des
cultures marines
Ministère de l'agriculture et de la pêche
3, place Fontenoy
75700 Paris

Daniel BERTHERY
Représentant permanent suppléant
Représentation permanente de la France
auprès de l'OAA
Corso del Rinascimento 52
00186 Rome
Italie

GABON

Ivone DIAS DA GRAÇA (Ms)
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République gabonaise auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République gabonaise
Via G. Mercalli 25
00197 Rome
Italie

GAMBIA

GEORGIA

GERMANY

Hartmut SCHLAPPER
Counsellor
Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture
and Forestry
Bonn

Achim VIERECK
Deputy Head of Unit
Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture
and Forestry
Bonn

GHANA

Mike Kwabena Sakyi AKYEAMPONG
Deputy Minister for Food and
Agriculture (Fisheries)
Ministry of Food and Agriculture
PO Box M.37
Accra

G.H. ANYANE
Director of Fisheries
Ministry of Food and Agriculture
PO Box M.37
Accra

Mallam I. SEIDU
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Ghana to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Ghana
Via Ostriana 4
00199 Rome
Italy

GREECE

Emmanuel GOUNARIS
Minister Plenipotentiary - Expert
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Athens

Dionyssios KYVETOS
Deputy Permanent Representative of
Greece to FAO
Embassy of Greece
Via Saverio Mercadante 36
00198 Rome
Italy

GUATEMALA

Rita CLAVERIE DE SCIOLLI
Representante Permanente Adjunto de la
República de Guatemala ante la FAO
Embajada de la República de Guatemala
Via dei Colli della Farnesina 128
00194 Roma
Italia

GUINEA

Mamba KOUROUMA
Conseiller technique pêche
Ministère de la pêche et de l'élevage
B.P. 307
Conakry

S. Deen BANGOURA
Ambassadeur auprès de la FAO
Représentant permanent
Représentation permanente de la
République de Guinée auprès de la FAO
Via Cassia 1280
00189 Rome
Italie

GUINEA-BISSAU

HAITI

Jean Robert BADIO
Directeur
Pêches et aquaculture
Ministère de l’agriculture et des
ressources naturelles
Damien
Port-au-Prince

Suze PERCY (Ms)
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République d’Haïti
Ambassade de la République d’Haïti
Via Ottaviano 32
00192 Rome
Italie

HONDURAS

Manuel Hernando REYES PINEDA
Representación Permanente de la
República de Honduras ante la FAO
Via Giambattista Vico 40, Int. 8
00196 Roma
Italia

HUNGARY

Károly PINTÉR
Deputy Head of Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Regional
Development
Kossuth L. tér 11
H-1055 Budapest

ICELAND

Kristján SKARPHÉDINSSON
Head of Division, Economical Affairs
Ministry of Fisheries
Skulagata 4
150 Reykjavik

Björn DAGBJARTSSON
Director, Icelandic Development Agency
Raudarstig 25
Reykjavik

Kristján PÓRARINSSON
Ministry of Fisheries
Icelandic Development Agency
Reykjavik

INDIA

N.K. SINHA
Secretary to Government of India
Ministry of Agriculture
Department of Animal Husbandry
Krishi Bhawan
New Delhii 110011

Yugraj Singh YADAVA
Fisheries Development Commissioner
Ministry of Agriculture
Government of India
Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi 110001

Neela GANGADHARAN (Ms)
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of India to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of India
Via XX Settembre 5
00187 Rome
Italy

INDONESIA

Sumpeno PUTRO
Agriculture Counsellor
Ministry of Agriculture
Indonesian Mission to EU
Bd. de la Woluwe 38
B-1200 Brussels
Belgium

Adek Triana YUDHASWARI (Ms)
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Indonesia to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia
Via Campania 55
00187 Rome
Italy

Badjuri HADIONO
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Indonesia to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia
Via Campania 55
00187 Rome

IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF

Ebrahim MAYGOLINEJAD
Director General
Public Relations and International Affairs
Fisheries Department (Shilat)
Ministry of Jehad-e-Sazandagi, Blv. Keshavarz
Teheran

M. Saeed NOURI-NAEENI
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Islamic
Republic of Iran to FAO
Via Aventina 8
00153 Rome
Italy

Mehdi EBRAHIMI
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Islamic
Republic of Iran to FAO
Via Aventina 8
00153 Rome
Italy

Mostafa JAFARI
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Islamic
Republic of Iran to FAO
Via Aventina 8
00153 Rome
Italy

IRAQ

Bader Jasim ALLAWI
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Republic of Iraq to FAO
Via della Camilluccia 355
00135 Rome
Italy

IRELAND

David BEEHAN
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Ireland to FAO
Embassy of Ireland
Piazza di Campitelli 3
00186 Rome
Italy

ISRAEL

ITALY

Luigi FONTANA-GIUSTI

Ambassadeur auprès de la FAO
Représentant permanent
Représentation permanente de l'Italie
auprès de la FAO
Piazza Margana 19
00186 Rome

Giuseppe AMBROSIO
Directeur général des pêches
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Viale dell'Arte 16
00144 Rome

Giovanni DELLA SETA
Responsable des recherches et statistiques
Direction générale des pêches
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Viale dell'Arte 16
00144 Rome

Rosanna FRONZUTO (Mme)
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Viale dell'Arte 16
00144 Rome

Stefano CATAUDELLA
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Viale dell'Arte 16
00144 Rome

Paolo MELOTTI
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Viale dell'Arte 16
00144 Rome

Stefania TEDESCHI (Ms)
Ministère pour les politiques agricoles
Via XX Settembre 20
Rome

Rosaria SABATELLA (Ms)
Istituto Ricerche Economiche per la Pesca
e l’Acquacoltura
Via S. Leonardo – Trav. Migliaro
84131 Salerno

Jerzy RYDZY
Ministère des affaires étrangères
D.G.R.C. uff. VII
Piazzale della Farnesina 1
Rome

JAPAN

Minoru MORIMOTO
Deputy Director-General
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Masayuki KOMATSU
International Negotiations on Fisheries
International Affairs Division
Fisheries Policy Department
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Kengo TANAKA
Deputy Assistant Director
International Affairs Division
Fisheries Policy Department
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Nobuyuki YAGI
Deputy Assistant Director
Far Seas Fisheries Division
Resource Management Department
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Yoichiro KANDA
Chief (Tuna Section)
Far Seas Fisheries Division
Resource Management Department
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Masakazu SAKURAI
Chief (Tuna Section)
Fish Product Distribution Division
Fisheries Policy Department
Fisheries Agency
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Tokyo

Hiroshi MITSUYA
Assistant Director
Fishery Division
Economic Affairs Bureau
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Tokyo

Eiko OZAKI (Ms)
Manager
Japan Tuna Federation
3-22 Kudankitu 2 chome, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo

Yoshihiro TAKAGI
Adviser
Overseas Fishery Cooperation Foundation
Tokyo

Gabriel Gómez DÍAZ
Senior Officer
Institute for Cetacean Research
Tokyo

Yoshio KANEKO
Executive Director
Global Guardian Trust
Tokyo

Masashi NISHIMURA
Assistant Manager
International Section, Operations Division
Japan Fisheries Association
Sankaido Bldg, 9-13 Akasaka 1
Minato-ku
Tokyo 107-0052

Etsuo KITAHARA
Permanent Representative of Japan to FAO
Embassy of Japan
Via Quintino Sella 60
00187 Rome
Italy

Takanori OHASHI
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Japan to FAO
Embassy of Japan
Via Quintino Sella 60
00187 Rome
Italy

KAZAKHSTAN

KENYA

Abigail N. SHANI (Ms)
Commercial Attaché
Embassy of the Republic of Kenya
Via Archimede 164
00197 Rome
Italy

KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

Jae-Young PARK
Director General
International Organization Division
Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries
Jinsol Bldg 826-14 Yoksamdong
Kangnam-ku
Seoul

Choong-Shin OH
Assistant Director
International Organization Division
Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries
Jinsol Bldg 826-14 Yoksamdong
Kangnam-ku
Seoul

KUWAIT

Khaled AL-MOBARAK
Director
Fisheries Department
Public Authority for Agriculture and Fish
Resources
PO Box 21422
13075 Safat

LATVIA

Normunds RIEKSTINŠ
Director
National Board of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
2, Republikas laukums
LV-1010 Riga

LESOTHO

LIBERIA

LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA

Atig HUNI
Director
Marine Biology Research Centre
Ministry of Marine Wealth
PO Box 30830
Tajura

Kamal AL HASIYA
Ministry of Marine Wealth
Sirte

Mohamed AL DIB
Ministry of Marine Wealth
Sirte

Naima GHANI (Ms)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Embassy of the Socialist People’s Libyan
Arab Jamahiriya
Via Nomentana 365
00162 Rome
Italy

LITHUANIA

Algìrdas ZEMAITIS
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Republic of Lithuania to FAO
Via al Quarto Miglio 111
00178 Rome
Italy

MADAGASCAR

Charles M.D. ANDRIANAIVOJAONA
Secrétaire général
Ministère de la pêche et des ressources
halieutiques
BP 1699
Antananarivo

Aimé Robert RABESALAMA
Directeur des pêches
Ministère de la pêche et des ressources
halieutiques
BP 1699
Antananarivo

MONJA
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République de Madagascar auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République de Madagascar
Via Riccardo Zandonai 84/A
00194 Rome
Italie

MALAYSIA

Mohd. Mazlan BIN JUSOH
Director General of Fisheries
Department of Fisheries of Malaysia
Ministry of Agriculture
Tingkat 8 & 9, Wisma Tani
Jalan Sultan Salahuddin
50628 Kuala Lumpur

Khairuddin MD TAHIR
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Malaysia to FAO
Embassy of Malaysia
Via Nomentana 297
00162 Rome
Italy

MALTA

Francis MONTANARO MIFSUD
Ambassador to FAO

Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Republic of Malta to FAO
Lungotevere Marzio 12
00186 Rome
Italy

MAURITANIA

MAURITIUS

Denis CANGY
Consul of the Republic of Mauritius
Representative of the Ambassador to FAO
Via G.B. Morgagni 6/a
00161 Rome
Italy

MEXICO

Carlos CAMACHO GAOS
Subsecretario de Pesca
Secretaría de Medio Ambiente, Recursos
Naturales y Pesca
Periférico Sur No 4209, Piso 6
Col. Jardines en la Montaña
06179 México D.F.

Mara MURILLO (Sra)
Directora General de Política y Fomento
Pesquero
Secretaría de Medio Ambiente, Recursos
Naturales y Pesca
Periférico Sur No 4209, Piso 6
Col. Jardines en la Montaña
06179 México D.F.

Jerónimo RAMOS
Director de Pesquería
Secretaría de Medio Ambiente, Recursos
Naturales y Pesca
Periférico Sur No 4209, Piso 6
Col. Jardines en la Montaña
06179 México D.F.

José ROBLES AGUILAR
Representante Permanente Adjunto de los
Estados Unidos Mexicanos ante la FAO
Embajada de los Estados Unidos
Mexicanos
Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 16
00161 Roma
Italia

María de los Angeles ARRIOLA AGUIRRE
(Ms)
Representante Permanente Adjunto de los
Estados Unidos Mexicanos ante la FAO
Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 16
00161 Roma
Italia

Juan Oscar TRINIDAD PALACIOS
Comisión de Pesca
Cámara de Diputados
Av. Congreso de la Unión No. 66
Col. del Parque
C.P. 15969
México, D.F.

Rosalinda BANDA GÓMEZ (Sra)
Comisión de Pesca
Cámara de Diputados
Av. Congreso de la Unión No. 66
Col. del Parque
C.P. 15969
México, D.F.

Víctor Armando GALVÁN
Diputado Federal
Comisión de Pesca
Cámara de Diputados
Av. Congreso de la Unión, No. 66
Col. del Parque
C.P. 15969
México, D.F.

Soledad LEAL (Sra)
Consejero
Delegación de México ante la OCDE
Secretaría de Comercio y Fomento Industrial
4 rue de Galliéra
75116 Paris
Francia

MOROCCO

Driss MESKI
Directeur de la coopération et des affaires
juridiques
Ministère des pêches
BP 476 Agdal
Rabat

Abdelouahed IDELHAJ
Chef
Département ressources halieutiques
Institut national de recherche halieutique
2 rue de Tiznit
Casablanca

Majid K. EL GHAÏB
Secrétaire général
Office national des pêches
Casablanca

Ahmed FASSI FIHRI
Directeur
Industries des pêches
Ministère des pêches maritimes
Rabat

Rachid SEFRIOUI
Chef de Division
Ministère des pêches maritimes
Quartier administratif
Rabat

M’hamed SEDRATI
Directeur
Institut national de recherche halieutique
Ministère des pêches maritimes
2 rue de Tiznit
Casablanca

MOZAMBIQUE

Ananias SIGAUQUE
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Mozambique to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Mozambique
Via Filippo Corridoni 14
00195 Rome
Italy

MYANMAR

U. KYI WIN
Alternate Permanent Representative of
the Union of Myanmar to FAO
Embassy of the Union of Myanmar
Viale Gioacchino Rossini, 18
00198 Rome
Italy

NETHERLANDS

NEW ZEALAND

Carolyn RISK (Ms)
Manager
Operational Policy
New Zealand Ministry of Fisheries
ASB Bank House
101-103 The Terrace
Wellington

William EMERSON
Senior Policy Analyst
New Zealand Ministry of Fisheries
ASB Bank House
101-103 The Terrace
Wellington

Peter FERGUSON
Alternate Permanent Representative of
New Zealand to FAO
Embassy of New Zealand
Via Zara 28
00198 Rome
Italy

NIGER

NIGERIA

Jonah M. MADUGU
Minister of State
Federal Ministry of Agriculture and
Natural Resources
Area 11, Garki
PMB 135
Abuja

J.A. GAFFAR
Director of Fisheries
Federal Ministry of Agriculture and
Natural Resources
Department of Fisheries
Area 11, Garki
PMB 135
Abuja

Onyeabo Emmanuel ONWUKEME
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Federal
Republic of Nigeria to FAO
Via Orazio 14-16
00193 Rome
Italy

NORWAY

Johan H. WILLIAMS
Director General
Ministry of Fisheries
PO Box 8118 Dep.
N-0032 Oslo

Tore RIISE
Deputy Director-General
Ministry of Fisheries
PO Box 8118 Dep.
N-0032 Oslo

Sigrun NYGARD (Ms)
Adviser
Ministry of Fisheries
PO Box 8118 Dep.
N-0032 Oslo

Egil LEKVEN
Head of Division
Directorate of Fisheries
PO Box 185
5000 Bergen

Cato ISVIK
Adviser
Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
Bergen

Kirsten BJORU (Ms)
Adviser, Norwegian Agency for Development
Cooperation (NORAD)
Oslo

Brit FISKNES
Adviser, Norwegian Agency for Development
Cooperation (NORAD)
Tollbugata 31
P.B. 8034 Dep. N-0030
Oslo

Alf Hakon HOEL
Associate Professor
Norwegian College of Fisheries Science
9037 Tromsø

OMAN

Shama BINT ZAKI EDIN ABDEL HALIM (Ms)
Fisheries Biologist
Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
Muscat

Yousaf AL-AFIFI
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Sultanate of Oman to FAO
Embassy of the Sultanate of Oman
Via della Camilluccia 625
00135 Rome
Italy

PAKISTAN

Adnan BASHIR KHAN
Alternate Permanent Representative of
the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to FAO
Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
Via della Camilluccia 682
00135 Rome
Italy

PANAMA

Arnulfo Luis FRANCO RODRIGUEZ
Director General de Recursos Marinos y Costeros
Autoridad Marítima de Panamá
Apto 8062, Zona 7
20117 Panamá

Ismael BERNAL MAURE

Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente
Representación Permanente de la
República de Panamá ante la FAO
Viale Regina Margherita 239 - piso 4
00198 Roma
Italia

Horacio MALTEZ
Representante Permanente Adjunto
Representación Permanente de la
República de Panamá ante la FAO
Viale Regina Margherita 239 - piso 4
00198 Roma
Italia

PERU

Juan Alberto ARRUS ROKOVICH
Vice-Ministro de Pesca
Ministerio de Pesquería
Calle Uno Oeste No.60,Urb. Córpac-San Isidro
Lima 27

Ana María DEÚSTUA (Sra)
Representante Permanente de la
República del Perú ante la FAO
Embajada de la República del Perú
Via Po 22
00198 Roma
Italia

Jorge ZUZUNAGA ZUZUNAGA
Asesor Despacho Ministerial
Ministerio de Pesquería
Calle Uno Oeste N° 60
Urb. Córpac-San Isidro
Lima 27

Eliot GAVIRIA
Ministerio de RREE del Perú
Jr Lampa cda 5
Lima 1

Luis Alfredo ICOCHEA SALAS
Decano Facultad de Pesquería
Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina
Miembro Directorio IMARPE
Asesor Despacho Ministerial de Pesquería
Avda. La Universidad s/n
La Molina
Lima 12

PHILIPPINES

Arsenio S. CAMACHO
Director
Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic
Resources
Department of Agriculture
860 Quezon Avenue
Quezon City

Noel D. DE LUNA
Deputy Permanent Representative of the
Republic of the Philippines to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of the
Philippines
Viale delle Medaglie d'Oro 112
00136 Rome
Italy

Maria Luisa GAVINO (Ms)

Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of the Philippines to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of the Philippines
Viale delle Medaglie d’Oro 112
00136 Rome
Italy

POLAND

Leszek DYBIEC
Deputy Director
Maritime Administration,
Shipping and Fisheries Department
Ministry of Transport and Maritime
Economy
Chalubinskiego U Str.
00-928 Warsaw

Ireneusz WOJCIK
International Fishery Expert
Dalmor S.A.
Str. Hryniewickie 6010
81-340 Gdynia

Daniel DUTKIEWICZ
Director
Sea Fisheries Institute
Ul. Kottgtaja 1
81-332 Gdynia

PORTUGAL

Eurico MONTEIRO
Director General
Ministry of Agriculture, Rural
Development and Fisheries
Directorate General for Fisheries and
Aquaculture
Ed. Vasco da Gama
Alcantâra Mar
1300 Lisbon

Helena FIGUEIREDO (Ms)
Director
Ministry of Agriculture, Rural
Development and Fisheries
Directorate General for Fisheries and
Aquaculture
Ed. Vasco da Gama
Alcantâra Mar
1300 Lisbon

ROMANIA

Nicolae ANGELESCU
Directeur
Département des pêches
Ministère de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation
Carol I Avenue 24 – Sector 3
70033 Bucharest

Cornelia MAXIM (Mme)
Conseiller
Département des pêches
Ministère de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation
Carol I Avenue 24 – Sector 3
70033 Bucharest

Ioan PAVEL
Représentant permanent adjoint de
Roumanie auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de Roumanie
Via Nicolò Tartaglia 36
00197 Rome
Italie

SAINT LUCIA

Horace WALTERS
Chief Fisheries Officer
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries
and the Environment
5th floor, Block A, NIS Building
Castries

SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

Kerwin MORRIS
Chief Fisheries Officer
Ministry of Agriculture and Labour
Kingstown

SAUDI ARABIA, KINGDOM OF

Abdul Aziz AL-YAHYA
Director-General
Marine Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Water
Office for Foreign Relations
PO Box 85954, Airport Road
Riyadh, KSA 11612

Nabil Ibrahim FITA
Marine Biologist
Ministry of Agriculture and Water
PO Box 134
Sihat

SENEGAL

Moussa Bocar LY
Représentant permanent adjoint de la
République du Sénégal auprès de la FAO
Ambassade de la République du Sénégal
Via Giulia 66
00186 Rome
Italie

Moustapha THIAM
Adjoint au Directeur de l'océanographie
et des pêches maritimes
Ministère de la pêche et des transports maritimes
Building administratif, 4ème étage
Dakar

SEYCHELLES

SLOVAKIA

Micek LUBOMIR
Permanent Representative of the Slovak
Republic to FAO
Embassy of the Slovak Republic
Via dei Colli della Farnesina 144
00194 Rome
Italy

SOUTH AFRICA

Monde MAYEKISO
Chief Director, Sea Fisheries
Department of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism
Pvt Bag X2
Rogge Bay 8012

Doug BUTTERWORTH
Department of Mathematics and Applied
Mathematics
University of Cape Town
Rondebosch 7701

SPAIN

Ignacio YBAÑEZ
Subdirector General
Organismos Multilaterales de Pesca
Secretaría General de Pesca Marítima
Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y
Alimentación
José Ortega y Gasset 57
Madrid

José Luis PAZ ESCUDERO
Consejero Técnico
Secretaría General de Pesca Marítima
Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y
Alimentación
José Ortega y Gasset 57
Madrid

Javier PIERNAVIEJA
Representante Permanente Adjunto de
España ante la FAO
Embajada de España (Oficina del
Representante Permanente ante la FAO)
Largo del Lombardi 21
00186 Roma
Italia

Carlos LARRAÑAGA
Jefe de Servicio
Secretaría General de Pesca Marítima
Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y
Alimentación
José Ortega y Gasset 57
Madrid

María del Carmen CADENAS DE
LLANO (Sra)
Jefe de Sección
Secretaría General de Pesca Marítima
Ministerio
de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentación
José Ortega y Gasset 57
Madrid

SRI LANKA

Neville PIYADIGAMA
Secretary
Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic
Resources Development
New Secretariat
Maligawatta
Colombo 10

Mangala T.K. NAGODAWITHANA
Acting Director
Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
Maligawatta
Colombo 10

Deeptha KULATILLEKE
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri
Lanka to FAO
Embassy of the Democratic Socialist
Republic of Sri Lanka
Via Adige 2
00198 Rome
Italy

SUDAN

Osman Mohamed SAEED
Deputy Director General
Animal Resources Research Corporation
Ministry of Animal Resources
PO Box 610
Khartoum

Mohamed Kheir HASSAN
Director General
Fisheries Administration
Ministry of Animal Resources
PO Box 293
Khartoum

Mohamed el Tahir ALI
Director
Fisheries Research Centre
Ministry of Animal Resources
PO Box 1489
Khartoum

M.S.M.A. HARBI
Permanent Representative of the Republic
of the Sudan to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan
Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 24
00161 Rome
Italy

SWAZILAND

SWEDEN

Stefan DE MARÉ
Director
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
Drottninggatan 21
S 103-33 Stockholm

Rolf ÅKESSON
Head of Section
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
Drottninggatan 21
S 103-33 Stockholm

Magnus BERGSTRÖM
Advisor of the National Administration
National Board of Fisheries
PO Box 423
S 40126 Gothenburg

Kent BLOM
Special Marine Adviser
Swedish International Development
Cooperation Agency (SIDA)
Stockholm

Reine J. JOHANSSON
Chairman
Federation of Swedish Fishermen
Amerikaskjulet Uppg. G
41463 Gothenburg

Marika NILSSON (Ms)
Federation of Swedish Fishermen
Amerikaskjulet Uppg. G
41463 Gothenburg

SYRIA

Salah SOUKKAR
Conseiller
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Mohajrin Shora
Damascus

TANZANIA

Thomas W. MAEMBE
Director of Fisheries
Fisheries Division
Ministry of Natural Resources and
Tourism
PO Box 2462
Dar-es-Salaam

G. NANYARO
Senior Fisheries Officer in charge of
Quality Control and Standards
Fisheries Division
Ministry of Natural Resources and
Tourism
PO Box 2462
Dar-es-Salaam

THAILAND

Chao TIANTONG
Permanent Representative of Thailand to FAO
Office of Agricultural Affairs
Royal Thai Embassy
Via Angelo Messedaglia 6 - Int. 2
00191 Rome, Italy

Sompong HIRANWAT
Senior Expert in Fisheries Foreign Affairs
Department of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Rajdamnern Nok Avenue
Bangkok 10200

Wimol JANTRAROTAI
Director of Fisheries Foreign Affairs
Department of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
Rajdamnern Nok Avenue
Bangkok 10200

TONGA

TUNISIA

Ahmed CHOUAYEKH
Directeur de la conservation halieutique
Direction générale de la pêche
Ministère de l'agriculture
Tunis

TURKEY

Kamuran PATRONA (Ms)
Head of Department
Directorate General for Agriculture
Production and Development
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Akay Cad. No. 3, Bakanliklar
Ankara

Selçuk ERBAS
Head of Section
Directorate General for Agriculture
Production and Development
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Mílli Müdofor Cad. No. 20, Kizilay
Ankara

Ahmet SAYLAM
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Republic
of Turkey to FAO
Via F. Denza 27, Int. 16
00197 Rome
Italy

UGANDA

Deo MUKIIBI
Ag. Commissioner for Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Animal
Industry and Fisheries
PO Box 102
Entebbe

Richard OGUTU-OHWAYO
Senior Research Officer
Ministry of Agriculture, Animal
Industry and Fisheries
PO Box 102
Entebbe

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Abdulrazzaq ANWAHI
Director
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
PO Box 1509
Dubai

Ahmed Mohammed AL ZAABI
Agronomist, Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
PO Box 1509
Dubai

UNITED KINGDOM

John TARBIT
Natural Resources Research Department
Department for International Development
94 Victoria Street
London SW1E 5JL

N. MACPHERSON
Senior Fisheries/Aquatic Resources Adviser
Department for International Development
94 Victoria Street
London SW1E 5JL

John STUPPEL
Head of Section III
Department for International Development
94 Victoria Street
London SW1A J4L

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Terry GARCIA
Assistant Secretary of Commerce for
Oceans and Atmosphere
US Department of Commerce
14th and Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20234

David A. BALTON
Director
Office of Marine Conservation
Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20520

Stetson TINKHAM
Senior Pacific Fishery Officer
Department of State
OES/OMC Rm 5806
Washington, D.C. 20520-7818

G. Nicholas MAUGER
Deputy Director
Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20520

Prudence FOX LEWIS
Special Assistant to the Deputy Assistant
Secretary for International Affairs
US Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
14th and Constitution Avenue NW, Rm 6224
Washington, D.C. 20234

Sonja FORDHAM (Ms)
Fisheries Project Manager
Center for Marine Conservation
1725 DeSales Street, NW Suite 600
Washington, D.C. 20036

Albert M. MANVILLE
Acting Chief, Branch of Policy, Coordination
and Communication
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Office of Migratory Bird Management
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 634
Arlington, VA 22203

Andrew A. ROSENBERG
Deputy Assistant Administrator
National Marine Fisheries Service
US Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
1315 East-West Highway, Rm 14564
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Justin LEBLANC
Vice-President for Government Relations
National Fisheries Institute
1901 N. Fort Myer Drive Suite 700
Arlington, VA 22209

Greg SCHNEIDER
International Trade Specialist
Department of Commerce
National Marine Fisheries Service
1315 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Michael SISSENWINE
Director
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
164 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543

Andrea OLIVER (Ms)
Senior Programme Officer
World Wildlife Fund
1250 24th Street NW
Washington, D.C.

Randi PARKS THOMAS (Ms)
National Director
United States Tuna Foundation
1101 17th Street, N.W., Suite 609
Washington, D.C. 20036

Robin TUTTLE (Ms)
Foreign Affairs Officer
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
National Marine Fisheries Service
1315 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910

David S. WHALEY
Senior Staff for Fisheries Policy
Committee on Resources
Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation,
Wildlife and Oceans
US House of Representatives
805 O’Neill HOB
Washington, D.C. 20515

URUGUAY

Amador RIPOLL
Director División Técnica
Instituto Nacional de Pesca (INAPE)
Constituyente 1497
11200 Montevideo

Laura GALARZA (Sra)
Agregado Civil
Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Via Gramsci 9
00197 Roma
Italia

VENEZUELA

Raúl ALEGRETT
Representante Permanente Alterno de la
República de Venezuela ante la FAO
Embajada de la República de Venezuela
Via Nicolò Tartaglia 11
00197 Roma
Italia

Jean-Francois PULVENIS
Embajador
Director de Fronteras Maritimas
Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Esquina de Carmelitas
Torre M.R.E. Piso 13
Caracas

Valero Rubin SANTOS
Agregado Tecnologico
Division del Mar

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Esquina de Carmelitas
Torre M.R.E. Piso 13
Caracas

Maritza CAMPO (Sra)
Representante Permanente Adjunto de la
República de Venezuela ante la FAO
Embajada de la República de Venezuela
Via Nicolò Tartaglia 11
00197 Roma
Italia

Lorenzo RAVAGO
Presidente, Federación Nacional de
Asociaciones Pesqueras (FENAPESCA)
Avda Miranda Qta Lorenya
Cumaná, Edo. Sucre

ZAMBIA

ZIMBABWE

Sophia MYAMUDEZA (Ms)
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Zimbabwe to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Zimbabwe
Via Virgilio 8
00193 Rome
Italy

OBSERVERS FROM FAO MEMBER NATIONS

BOLIVIA

Maria Soledad PAREJA DELOS (Sra)
Representante Permanente Alterno de la
República de Bolivia ante la FAO
Embajada de la República de Bolivia
Via Brenta 2A, int. 28, 00198 Roma
Italia

BULGARIA

Krassimir KOSTOV
Permanent Representative of the
Republic of Bulgaria to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Bulgaria
Via Pietro Paolo Rubens 21, 00197 Rome
Italy

CROATIA

Duska PARAVIC (Ms)
Alternate Permanent Representative of
the Republic of Croatia to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Croatia
Via Luigi Bodio 74-76
00191 Rome
Italy

Viktor TADIC
Alternate Permanent Representative of
the Republic of Croatia to FAO
Embassy of the Republic of Croatia
Via Luigi Bodio 74-76
00191 Rome
Italy

DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC
OF KOREA

Hung Rim KIM
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the Democratic
People’s Republic of Korea to FAO
Via Ludovico di Savoia 23
00185 Rome
Italy

Tae Song HAN
Alternate Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
to FAO
Via Ludovico di Savoia 23
00185 Rome
Italy

NAMIBIA

Alpheus G. NARUSEB
Deputy Minister
Ministry of Fisheries and Marine
Resources
Private Bag 13355
Windhoek

Emma Sibahe BOYS (Ms)
Chief Policy Analyst
Ministry of Fisheries and Marine
Resources
Private Bag 13355
Windhoek

Hilda Nubahe KHOËSES (Ms)
Deputy Director
Ministry of Fisheries and Marine
Resources
Private Bag 13355
Windhoek

Shihaleni Ellis NDJABA
Director Operations
Ministry of Fisheries and Marine
Resources
Private Bag 13355
Windhoek

SLOVENIA

Danilo BELOGLAVEC
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Republic of Slovenia to FAO
Via della Traspontina 15
00193 Rome
Italy

VANUATU

Kenneth DOROSDAY
Director
Policy and Corporate Services
Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Forestry

and Fisheries
PMB 039
Port Vila

VIET NAM

Huong NGUYEN THI XUAN (Ms)
Alternate Permanent Representative of the
Socialist Republic of Viet Nam to FAO
Embassy of the Socialist Republic of
Viet Nam
Via Clitunno 34/36
00198 Rome
Italy

YEMEN

Ahmed AL-HAWRI
Permanent Representative
Permanent Representation of the
Republic of Yemen to FAO
Via Alessandro Malladra 10B, Int. 10
00157 Rome
Italy

OBSERVERS FROM UNITED NATIONS MEMBER STATES NOT MEMBERS OF FAO

RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Igor SHAPOVALOV
Permanent Observer of the Russian
Federation to FAO
Bureau of the Permanent Observer of the
Russian Federation to FAO
Via Gaeta 5
00185 Rome
Italy

Boris Z. GRAIVER
Head of Division
Russian Research Institute of Fisheries
Economics and Information
Ap. 350 Mira Avenue 112
Moscow

Igor SINELNIKOV
Embassy of the Russian Federation
Via Gaeta 5
00185 Rome
Italy

PERMANENT OBSERVER TO FAO

HOLY SEE

Monseigneur Alois WAGNER
Observateur permanent du Saint-Siège
auprès de la FAO
Palazzo San Calisto
Piazza San Calisto 16
00120 Cité du Vatican

Vincenzo BUONOMO
Observateur adjoint du Saint-Siège
auprès de la FAO Palazzo San Calisto
Piazza San Calisto 16
00120 Cité du Vatican

Lelio BERNARDI
Conseiller
Palazzo San Calisto
Piazza San Calisto 16
00120 Cité du Vatican

Giovanni TEDESCO
Conseiller
Palazzo San Calisto
Piazza San Calisto 16
00120 Cité du Vatican

Gérard TRONCHE
Conseiller
Palazzo San Calisto
Piazza San Calisto 16
00120 Cité du Vatican

REPRESENTATIVES OF UNITED NATIONS AND SPECIALIZED AGENCIES

UNITED NATIONS

André TAHINDRO
Senior Officer
Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law
of the Sea
Two United Nations Plaza
New York NY 10017
United States of America

WORLD BANK

Gert VAN SANTEN
Senior Fisheries Specialist
The World Bank
1818 H Street NW
Washington DC 20433
United States of America

Anita GORDON (Ms)
Environment and Communications
Specialist
The World Bank
1818 H Street NW
Washington DC 20433
United States of America

OBSERVERS FROM INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

CENTRE FOR MARKETING INFORMATION AND ADVISORY SERVICES FOR FISHERY PRODUCTS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Roland WIEFELS
Director
INFOPESCA
Julio Herrera y Obes 1296
11200 Montevideo
Uruguay

COMMISSION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC MARINE LIVING RESOURCES

Esteban DE SALAS
Executive Secretary
CCAMLR
P.O. Box 213
North Hobart, Tasmania 7002
Australia

COMMISSION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF SOUTHERN BLUEFIN TUNA

Campbell McGREGOR
Executive Secretary
CCSBT
119 Napier Cl.
Deakin, Canberra 2611
Australia

COMMONWEALTH SECRETARIAT

Semisi T. FAKAHAU
Chief Programme Officer
Agricultural Development Unit
Export and Industrial Development Division
Marlborough House
Pall Mall
London SW1Y 5HX
United Kingdom

COUNCIL OF EUROPE

Fernando GONZALEZ LAXE
Chairman
Sub-Committee on Fisheries
Committee on Agriculture and Rural
Development of the Parliamentary
Assembly of the Council of Europe
Avda. de Arteijo 9 2D
15004 La Coruña
Spain

INDIAN OCEAN TUNA COMMISSION

David ARDILL
Secretary
IOTC
PO Box 1011
Victoria
Seychelles

INTERNATIONAL BALTIC SEA FISHERY COMMISSION

Walter RANKE
Secretary
IBSFC
20 Hoza Str
00-528 Warsaw
Poland

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF ATLANTIC TUNAS

Adolfo RIBEIRO LIMA
Secretario Ejecutivo
ICCAT
Corazón de Maria, 8-6°
28002 Madrid
Spain

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR THE EXPLORATION OF THE SEA

Christopher C.E. HOPKINS
General Secretary
ICES
Palaegade 2-4
DK-1261 Copenhagen K
Denmark

Hans LASSEN
Fisheries Adviser
ICES
Palaegade 2-4
DK-1261 Copenhagen K
Denmark

INTERNATIONAL WHALING COMMISSION

Masayuki KOMATSU
Director for International Negotiations
Fisheries Policy Department
Fisheries Agency
1-2-1 Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100
Japan

LAKE VICTORIA FISHERIES ORGANIZATION

Micheni J. NTIBA
Executive Secretary
LVFO
P.O. Box 1625
Jinja
Uganda

LATIN AMERICAN ORGANIZATION FOR FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT

Carlos MAZAL
Director Ejecutivo
OLDEPESCA
Calle Las Palomas 422
Lima 34
Perú

NETWORK OF AQUACULTURE CENTRES IN ASIA-PACIFIC

Michael PHILLIPS
Environment Specialist
NACA
Suraswadi Building
Department of Fisheries Compound
Kasetsart University Campus
Ladyao, Jatujak
Bangkok 10900
Thailand

NORTH PACIFIC ANADROMOUS FISH COMMISSION

Irina SHESTAKOVA (Ms)
Executive Director
NPAFC
Suite 502
889 West Pender Street
Vancouver B.C., V6C 3B2
Canada

ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT

Ola FLAATEN
Head of Fisheries Division
Directorate for Food, Agriculture
and Fisheries
OECD
2, rue André-Pascal
75775 Paris, Cedex 16
France

PERMANENT SOUTH PACIFIC COMMISSION

Manuel FLORES
Secretario General Adjunto para Asuntos
Científicos
CPPS
Av. Coruña N. 31-83 y Whymper
Quito
Ecuador

SECRETARIAT FOR THE CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA

Ger VAN VLIET
Head Scientific Coordination
CITES Secretariat
15 Chemin des Anémones
1219 Geneva
Switzerland

SOUTHEAST ASIAN FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

Udom BHATIYASEVI
Secretary-General
SEAFDEC
Suraswadi Building
Department of Fisheries Compound
Kasetsart University Main Campus Chatuchak
Bangkok 10900
Thailand

OBSERVERS FROM NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

ASSOCIATION FOR THE CONSERVATION, MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF FISHERIES IN WEST AFRICA

Michael ANSA-EMMIM
Chairman
ASCADEP
B.P. 16069
Dakar-Fann
Dakar
Senegal

Jacqueline LOPEZ ANSA-EMMIM (Ms)
Secretary General
ASCADEP
B.P. 16069
Dakar-Fann
Dakar
Senegal

BIRDLIFE INTERNATIONAL

John COOPER
Coordinator of Birdlife International
Seabird Conservation Programme
University of Cape Town
Cape Town
South Africa

EUROPEAN BUREAU FOR CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT

Despina SYMONS PIROVOLIDOV (Ms)
Director
EBCD
10 rue de la Science
1000 Brussels
Belgium

FISHMEAL EXPORTERS ORGANIZATION

Jean-François MITTAINE
Director
FEO
13, rue Madeleine Michelis
92200 Neuilly
France

GLOBAL AQUACULTURE ALLIANCE

Helen DIXON (Ms)
Executive Director
GAA
7316 Manatee Ave. W. Suite 335
Bradenton, FL 34209
United States of America

GREENPEACE INTERNATIONAL

Matthew GIANNI
Oceans Campaign Coordinator
Keizersgracht 176
1016 DW Amsterdam
The Netherlands

Helene BOURS (Ms)
Route d’Amonines 15
B-6987 Rendeux
Belgium

INTERNATIONAL COALITION OF FISHERIES ASSOCIATIONS

Patrick McGUINNESS
Vice President, ICFA
1525 Wilson Boulevard Suite 0
Arlington VA 22209
United States of America

Sally CAMPEN (Ms)
ICFA
1525 Wilson Boulevard
Suite 0
Arlington VA 22209
United States of America

INTERNATIONAL COLLECTIVE IN SUPPORT OF FISHWORKERS

Sebastian MATHEW
Executive Secretary
ICSF
27, College Road
Madras 600 006
India

INTERNATIONAL CONFEDERATION
OF FREE TRADE UNIONS

Jon WHITLOW
Assistant Secretary
International Transport Workers'
Federation
ICFTU
49-60 Borough Road
GB London SE1 1DS
United Kingdom

INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE ALLIANCE

Lino VISANI
ICA
Borgo Santo Spirito, 78
00193 Rome
Italy

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF
WOMEN

Lydie ROSSINI VAN HISSENHOVEN (Ms)
ICW
Via Tailandia, 26
00144 Rome
Italy

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTRE

F. Brian DAVY
Directeur de la recherche
Direction générale des programmes
IDRC
C.P. 8500
Ottawa, Ontario K1G 3H9
Canada

INTERNATIONAL FISHMEAL AND OIL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

Stuart M. BARLOW
Director General
IFOMA
2 College Yard
Lower Dagnall Street
St Albans
Hertfordshire AL3 4PA
United Kingdom

INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT CONSORTIUM

Jaques BERNEY
Executive Vice-President
IWMC
3 passage Montriond
1006 Lausanne
Switzerland

Stephen S. BOYNTON
IWMC
4 Avenue des Roses
1009 Pully
Switzerland

David WILLS
Senior Fellow
World Conservation Trust
Peat Institute
IWMC
101 D. 57 SE
Washington, D.C.
United States of America

W.R. MONROE
Vice President
Darden Environmental Trust
IWMC
5900 Lake Ellenor Drive
Orlando, FL 34786
United States of America

WORLD CONSERVATION UNION

John WAUGH
Senior Programme Officer
IUCN
1630 Connecticut Ave. NW, 3rd Floor
Washington, D.C. 20009
United States of America

Charlotte DE FONTAUBERT (Ms)
Marine Programme Officer
IUCN
1630 Connecticut Ave. NW, 3rd Floor
Washington, D.C. 20009
United States of America

WORLD FORUM OF FISH-HARVESTERS AND FISHWORKERS

Thomas KOCHERRY
General Coordinator
WFF
Valiathura
Thiruvananthapuram 695 008
India



OFFICERS OF THE COMMITTEE AT THE TWENTY-THIRD SESSION

     

Chairperson:

Mr Mike Akyeampong (Ghana)

First Vice-Chairperson:

Mr Minoru Morimoto (Japan)

Vice-Chairpersons:

Mr Juan Alberto Arrus Rokovich (Peru)

 

Mr Osman Mohamed Saeed (Sudan)

 

Mr Giuseppe Ambrosio (Italy)

 

Ms Carolyn Risk (New Zealand)

 

Mr Ronald Rose (Canada)

   

DRAFTING COMMITTEE

Australia

Morocco

Brazil

New Zealand

China

Spain

Eritrea

Sudan

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Sweden

Japan

Thailand

Mexico

United States of America

FAO FISHERIES DEPARTMENT

   

Assistant Director-General:

M. Hayashi

Director, Fishery Resources Division:

S. Garcia

Director, Fishery Industries Division:

G. Valdimarsson

Officer-in-Charge, Fishery Policy and Planning Division:

G. Valdimarsson

SECRETARIAT

Secretary:

B.P. Satia

Legal Officer:

D. Fadda

Consultant:

J. Naylor

Meetings Officer:

J.C. Webb



APPENDIX C

List of Documents

COFI/99/1 Rev.2

Provisional Agenda and Timetable

2

Integrated Resource Management for Sustainable Inland Fish Production

2 Corr.

 

3

Progress Report on the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries

4

Progress Report on the Implementation of Conference Resolution 13/97 (Review of FAO Statutory Bodies) and the Strengthening of FAO Regional Fishery Bodies

5

Review of FAO’s Programmes in the Fisheries Sector:

5 Part I

Achievements of Major Programme 2.3: Fisheries

5 Part II Rev.

Follow-up to the Requests and Recommendations of the 22nd Session of COFI

5 Part III

Report of the Consultation on the Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries, Rome, 26-30 October 1998

5 Part IV

The Implementation of International Plans of Action/Guidelines on Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries: a costed proposal for support by the FAO Fisheries Department

6

Decisions and Recommendations of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, Sixth Session, Bremen, Germany, 3-6 June 1998

6 Sup.1

Follow-up to Some Decisions and Recommendations of the Sub- Committee on Fish Trade, Sixth Session, Bremen, Germany, 3-6 June 1998

 

7

Fisheries and Aquaculture Issues in Small Island Developing States

8

Medium-Term Perspectives - Major Programme 2.3 Fisheries 2000-2005

9/CL 115/12

FAO Strategic Framework 2000-2015 Version 1.0

9 Sup.1

FAO Strategic Framework 2000-2015 Version 2.0

COFI/99/Inf.1 Rev.1

Provisional List of Documents

Inf.2

Provisional List of Delegates

Inf.3

Statement by the Director-General

Inf.4

The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 1998

Inf.5

Report of the Twenty-second Session of the Committee on Fisheries, Rome, 17-20 March 1997

Inf.6

Draft FAO Fisheries Department Medium-Term Strategy in Support of the Implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries 1998-2002

Inf.7

Trends and Issues Relating to Global Fisheries Governance Addressed by the Committee on Fisheries (1977-1997)

Inf.8

Recent International Fishery Instruments and the Role of Regional Fishery Bodies in Conservation and Management of Resources

Inf.9

FAO’s Fisheries Agreements Register (FARISIS)

Inf.10

Synthesis of the Report of the First Session of the Advisory Committee on Fisheries Research, Rome, 25-28 November 1997

Inf.11

Report on the High-level Panel of External Experts in Fisheries held in Rome, Italy, 26-27 January 1998

Inf.12

High-level Panel on Sustainable Development - Second Meeting. Final Report and Recommendations. FAO, Rome, 26-27 January 1998

Inf.13

Report of the Sixth Session of the COFI Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, Bremen, Germany, 3-6 June 1998

Inf.14

Report on the Meeting of FAO and Non-FAO Regional Fishery Bodies or Arrangements: Main Conclusions and Recommendations. FAO, Rome, 11-12 February 1999

Inf.15

Future Challenges in World Fisheries and Aquaculture

Inf.16 Part I

Report of the Technical Consultation on the Feasibility of Developing Non-discriminatory Technical Guidelines for Eco-labelling of Products from Marine Capture Fisheries, Rome, Italy, 21-23 October 1998

Inf.16 Part II

Report of the meeting of the FAO Ad hoc Expert Group on Listing Criteria for Marine Species under CITES, Cape Town, South Africa, 20 November 1998

Inf.17

Statement of Competence and Voting Rights by the European Community and its Member States

Inf.18

Summary Report on the FAO Technical Consultation on Policies for Sustainable Shrimp Culture (Bangkok, Thailand, 8-11 December 1997) and on Follow-up Activities

 


APPENDIX D

Opening Statement by Mr David A. Harcharik
FAO Deputy Director-General

Mr Chairman, Distinguished Delegates, Ladies and Gentlemen, good morning.

On behalf of the Director-General, it is my pleasure to welcome you to this Twenty-third Session of the Committee on Fisheries. And let me say at the outset that we are very pleased to see such a large turnout for this meeting.

Mr Chairman, I need not remind this audience that the World’s fisheries are confronted with a number of serious and far-reaching challenges. Many of these challenges threaten not only the resource base of the sector but also the livelihoods of millions of people who depend on fisheries and aquaculture. Your Committee, thus, has a task of great importance and of considerable complexity, that of providing guidance to FAO on how we can best meet these challenges to world fisheries and aquaculture. You will, though, no doubt also identify opportunities for action by governments, other international bodies and non-governmental organizations. I am, then, pleased to note that each of these groups is represented here today, as each has a special contribution to make.

In particular, we look forward to hearing the experienced views of senior representatives of national fisheries administrations. As you are engaged daily in leading your countries towards sustainable fisheries management and responsible utilization of resources, you know, perhaps better than anyone else, the fisheries needs and aspirations of your countries, and you are, thus, especially well placed to suggest how FAO can help you achieve your objectives. Welcome.

I am also very pleased to see here a number of colleagues from other international organizations, donors and non-governmental organizations, as well as specialized bodies concerned with aquatic resource affairs. Each of you has valuable and often unique views and specialized knowledge on various aspects of fisheries and aquaculture. Your advice and your opinions are very much welcome and appreciated here.

This meeting is an important event, not only because of its substantial agenda, but also because it will be followed by a Ministerial Meeting just a few weeks from now in March. That meeting will be the first opportunity that Ministers responsible for fisheries have had to meet since the adoption of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in 1995.

The agenda you have before you for this session of the Committee is full and wide-ranging. The framework of your discussions falls into two main parts, reflecting the Committee’s twofold mandate. First, you are invited to examine a number of important issues in world fisheries and aquaculture and to offer advice on certain problems, whose resolution may call for action not only by FAO, but also by governments, other international organizations, donors and non-governmental organizations. Secondly, you will have the opportunity to review the FAO Strategic Framework 2000 –2015, and the medium-term perspectives and programme priorities for fisheries for the period 2000-2005.

As in the previous biennia, the Fisheries Department has undertaken a world wide analysis of the state of fisheries and aquaculture (SOFIA) which has been circulated to you as Document Inf.4 called SOFIA 1998. It examines developments in the sector from the perspective of sustainability in fisheries and aquaculture. Among other issues, the report aims to shed light on the need for good governance in fisheries and aquaculture, while also highlighting two closely related issues: the establishment of an enabling environment for aquaculture activity, and the integration of fisheries into coastal zone management. It is my understanding that you will start your work with a presentation on SOFIA.

At your last session, you directed the Secretariat to provide each session with a report on the progress achieved in implementing the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. We will update you on the Code but also will encourage you to exchange further experiences concerning progress achieved at global, regional and national levels. One important fact which emerges from the survey undertaken by FAO on the implementation of the Code is that, despite support from some donors, there is an insufficient flow of financial resources to developing countries for the implementation of the Code. In this regard, I would like to thank those donors and other development agencies who have generously supported activities related to the Code, while also expressing the hope that this will continue and also grow.

The Fisheries Department has elaborated a comprehensive strategy to promote further implementation of the Code in a coherent, integrated and practical manner during the period 1998 to 2002. We look forward to your comments on this Draft Strategy, which has been circulated as document Inf.6.

I would also like to draw attention to the important role of global and regional collaboration in fisheries. In this respect, I am pleased to report that this Session of your Committee was preceded by a two-day meeting of FAO and non-FAO regional fishery bodies, from which a number of important recommendations emerged for your consideration. Furthermore, as was recommended by your Committee at its last Session and endorsed by the 1997 FAO Conference, eight of nine FAO regional fishery bodies have considered measures to strengthen their functions and responsibilities. We look forward to your debate on the outcome of these reviews. In particular we seek your suggestions on how to improve these important channels of regional cooperation and on how these regional bodies can be better linked to FAO.

Under other agenda items, your Committee is invited to finalize and approve Plans of Action or Guidelines on the management of fishing capacity, shark fisheries and incidental catch of sea birds in longline fisheries. We will also share with you the report of the Sixth Session of the FAO Sub-Committee on Fish Trade held in Bremen, Germany, last June.

As all of you are aware, small island communities are inevitably dependent on the sea and its living resources for their existence. Your Committee has been provided with a summary document on the major fisheries and aquaculture issues in small islands developing states (SIDS). Your observations on this will contribute to the Plan of Action to be developed at the Ministerial Conference on Agriculture and Small Islands Developing States, to be held on 12 March.

It is within the context of these major issues concerning world fisheries that the medium-term perspectives for "Fisheries" has been elaborated. You will see that we propose to reinforce our role in the collection, analysis and dissemination of fisheries information and data. Furthermore, we propose to emphasize the development of appropriate fishery management alternatives, and FAO’s role as a centre for policy advice and analysis on fisheries and aquaculture management and investment. Special attention is also placed on the inter-relationships between capture fisheries, aquaculture and agriculture; on the monitoring and prevention of environmental degradation; and on the promotion of sustainable and environmentally sound fisheries and aquaculture practices. Other areas of proposed emphasis include the promotion of technical standards and international norms for improved utilization, trade, quality and safety of fishery and aquaculture products.

In November 1997 the FAO Conference decided that FAO should introduce an improved programming approach for Regular Programme activities. The change in approach includes the elaboration, through interactive and participatory processes, of a "Strategic Framework" with a 10 to 15 year time-horizon. The Strategic Framework will be complemented by a Medium-Term Plan, which will constitute the main programming document over a time horizon of six years. The Fisheries Department is, of course, contributing actively to the formulation of the Strategic Framework.

You should also note that, in view of the Council’s decision to schedule the meetings of the Technical Committees earlier in the year, there has not been time enough to develop detailed proposals for the Programme of Work and Budget for the next biennium to present to the Committee. The new programme entities under a revised programming methodology are still being finalized. Your advice and comments on FAO’s Strategic Framework, and in particular on its fisheries related aspects, as well as the Medium-Term Perspectives for fisheries will, of course, be taken into account as we prepare the full Programme of Work and Budget.

Mr Chairman, Distinguished Delegates, I am confident that you will address the many important aspects of fisheries and aquaculture in your traditional spirit of cooperation and consensus. I am also sure that your experienced guidance will be offered with a sense of pragmatism and vision not only to the Secretariat but to all those in our Member Nations and sister organizations who are charged with responsibilities for the future advance of this very important sector of human endeavour.

Mr Chairman, in closing, I should like to assure you and the entire Committee that your deliberations are of great importance to the Secretariat. We value your opinions and we will use your advice to guide our future work in fisheries and aquaculture. May I wish you and the Members of your Committee a successful and highly productive meeting and a most enjoyable stay in this beautiful city of Rome.



APPENDIX E.1

International Plan of Action for Reducing Incidental
Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries



Introduction

1. Seabirds are being incidentally caught in various commercial longline fisheries in the world, and concerns are arising about the impacts of this incidental catch. Incidental catch of seabirds may also have an adverse impact on fishing productivity and profitability. Governments, non-governmental organizations, and commercial fishery associations are petitioning for measures to reduce the mortality of seabirds in longline fisheries in which seabirds are incidentally taken.

2. Key longline fisheries in which incidental catch of seabirds are known to occur are: tuna, swordfish and billfish in some particular parts of oceans; Patagonian toothfish in the Southern Ocean, and halibut, black cod, Pacific cod, Greenland halibut, cod, haddock, tusk and ling in the northern oceans (Pacific and Atlantic). The species of seabirds most frequently taken are albatrosses and petrels in the Southern Ocean, northern fulmars in the North Atlantic and albatrosses, gulls and fulmars in the North Pacific fisheries.

3. Responding to the need to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds in commercial fisheries in the Southern Ocean, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) adopted mitigation measures in 1992 for its 23 member countries to reduce incidental catch of seabirds.

4. Under the auspices of the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna (CCSBT), Australia, Japan and New Zealand have studied and taken seabird mitigation measures in their southern bluefin tuna longline fishery since 1994, and in 1995 CCSBT adopted a recommendation relating to ecologically related species, including the incidental mortality of seabirds by longline fishing. The recommendation stipulates a policy on data and information collection, mitigation measures, as well as education and information dissemination. All member nations of CCSBT have made the use of bird scaring lines (tori poles) mandatory in their fisheries.

5. The United States of America also adopted, by regulation, measures for reducing incidental catch of seabirds for its groundfish longline fisheries in Seabirds are being incidentally caught in various commercial longline the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska in 1997, and for its halibut fishery in 1998. The United States is currently developing measures to mitigate the incidental catch of seabirds in the Hawaiian pelagic longline fisheries. Several other countries with longline fisheries have likewise adopted similar mitigation measures.

Origin

6. Noting an increased awareness about the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries and its potential negative impacts on seabird populations, a proposal was made at the Twenty-second Session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in March 1997 that FAO organize an expert consultation, using extra-budgetary funds, to develop Guidelines leading to a Plan of Action to be submitted at the next Session of COFI aiming at a reduction in such incidental catch.

7. The International Plan of Action for reducing incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries (IPOA-SEABIRDS) has been developed through the meeting of a Technical Working Group in Tokyo 25-27 March 19981 and the Consultation on the Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries held 26-30 October 1998 and its preparatory meeting held in Rome 22-24 July 19982.

Nature and Scope

8. IPOA-Seabirds is voluntary. It has been elaborated within the framework of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries as envisaged by Article 2 (d). The provisions of Article 3 of the Code of Conduct apply to the interpretation and application of this document and its relationship with other international instruments. All concerned States3 are encouraged to implement it.

9. The IPOA-SEABIRDS applies to States in the waters of which longline fisheries are being conducted by their own or foreign vessels and to States that conduct longline fisheries on the high seas and in the exclusive economic zones (EEZ) of other States.

Objective

10. Taking into account in particular the objectives of articles 7.6.9 and 8.5 of the Code of Conduct, the objective of the IPOA-SEABIRDS is to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries where this occurs.

Implementation

11. In implementing the IPOA-SEABIRDS States should carry out a set of activities. This should be done as appropriate in conjunction with relevant international organizations. The exact configuration of this set of activities will be based on an assessment of the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries.

12. States with longline fisheries should conduct an assessment of these fisheries to determine if a problem exists with respect to incidental catch of seabirds. If a problem exists, States should adopt a National Plan of Action for reducing the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries (NPOA-SEABIRDS). (See the attached "Technical note on developing a National Plan of Action for reducing the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries".) When developing the NPOA-SEABIRDS experience acquired in regional management organizations should be taken into account as appropriate. FAO should provide a list of experts and a mechanism of technical assistance to countries for use in connection with development of NPOA-SEABIRDS.

13. States which determine that an NPOA-SEABIRDS is not necessary should review that decision on a regular basis, particularly taking into account changes in their fisheries, such as the expansion of existing fisheries and/or the development of new longline fisheries. If, based on a subsequent assessment, States determine that a problem exists, they should follow the procedures outlined in paragraph 12, and implement an NPOA-SEABIRDS within two years.

14. The assessment should be included as a part of each relevant State’s NPOA-SEABIRDS.

15. Each State is responsible for the design, implementation and monitoring of its NPOA-SEABIRDS.

16. States recognize that each longline fishery is unique and the identification of appropriate mitigation measures can only be achieved through on-the-spot assessment of the concerned fisheries. Technical and operational mitigation measures are presently in use or under development in some longline fisheries where incidental catch of seabirds occurs. Measures developed by different States are listed in a Technical Note attached to this document. This list does not prejudice the right of States to decide to use any of these or other suitable measures that may be developed. A more comprehensive description and discussion of the mitigation measures currently used or under development can be found in FAO Fisheries Circular No. 937.

17. States should start the implementation of the NPOA-SEABIRDS no later than the COFI Session in 2001.

18. In implementing their NPOA-SEABIRDS States should regularly, at least every four years, assess their implementation for the purpose of identifying cost-effective strategies for increasing the effectiveness of the NPOA-SEABIRDS.

19. States, within the framework of their respective competencies and consistent with international law, should strive to cooperate through regional and subregional fisheries organizations or arrangements, and other forms of cooperation, to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries.

20. In implementing the IPOA-SEABIRDS States recognize that cooperation among States which have important longline fisheries is essential to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds given the global nature of the issue. States should strive to collaborate through FAO and through bilateral and multilateral arrangements in research, training and the production of information and promotional material.

21. States should report on the progress of the assessment, development and implementation of their NPOA-SEABIRDS as part of their biennial reporting to FAO on the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.

Role of FAO

22. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, and as part of its Regular Programme activities support States in the implementation of the IPOA-SEABIRDS.

23. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, support development and implementation of NPOA-SEABIRDS through specific, in-country technical assistance projects with Regular Programme funds and by use of extra-budgetary funds made available to the Organization for this purpose.

24. FAO will, through COFI, report biennially on the state of progress in the implementation of the IPOA-SEABIRDS.

TECHNICAL NOTE ON DEVELOPING A NATIONAL PLAN OF ACTION FOR REDUCING THE INCIDENTAL CATCH OF SEABIRDS IN LONGLINE FISHERIES (NPOA-SEABIRDS)

This is not an exclusive or necessarily all-encompassing list but provides guidance for preparation of the NPOA-SEABIRDS.

The NPOA-SEABIRDS is a plan that a State designs, implements and monitors to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries.

I. Assessment

1. The purpose of the assessment is to determine the extent and nature of a State’s incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries where it occurs.

2. The assessment may include, but is not limited to, the collection and analysis of the:

II. NPOA-Seabirds

The NPOA-SEABIRDS may contain the following elements:

1. Prescription of mitigation measures

The NPOA-SEABIRDS should prescribe appropriate mitigation methods. These should have a proven efficiency, and be cost-effective for the fishing industry. If effectiveness of mitigation measures can be improved by combining different mitigation measures or devices, it is likely that each State will find it advantageous to implement a number of different measures that reflect the need and particular circumstances of their specific longline fishery.

2. Research and development

The NPOA-SEABIRDS should contain plans for research and development, including those aiming: (i) to develop the most practical and effective seabird deterrent device; (ii) to improve other technologies and practices which reduce the incidental capture of seabirds; and (iii) undertake specific research to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation measures used in the longline fisheries, where this problem occurs.

3. Education, training and publicity

The NPOA-SEABIRDS should prescribe means to raise awareness among fishers, fishing associations and other relevant groups about the need to reduce the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries where this occurs; National and International Plans of Action and other information on the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries; and to promote the implementation of the NPOA-SEABIRDS among national industry, research and its own administration.

Provide information about technical or financial assistance for reducing the incidental catch of seabirds.

Preferably design and implementation of outreach programmes for fishers, fisheries managers, gear technologists, maritime architects, shipbuilders, and conservationists and other interested members of the public should be described in the plan. These programmes should aim at improving the understanding of the problem resulting from incidental catch of seabirds and the use of mitigation measures. The outreach programme may include educational curricula, and guidelines disseminated through videos, handbooks, brochures and posters. The programme should focus on both the conservation aspects of this issue and on the economic benefits of expected increased fishing efficiency inter alia by eliminating bait loss to seabirds.

4. Data collection

Data collection programmes should collect reliable data to determine the incidental catch of seabirds in longline fisheries and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. Such programmes may make use of onboard observers.

TECHNICAL NOTE ON SOME OPTIONAL TECHNICAL AND OPERATIONAL MEASURES FOR REDUCING THE INCIDENTAL CATCH OF SEABIRDS

I. Introduction

To reduce the incidental catch of seabirds, it is essential to reduce the number of encounters between seabirds and baited hooks. It should be noted that, if used in combination, the options could improve mitigation effectiveness.

For each of the measures, the effectiveness and the cost involved for fishers are briefly presented. In this presentation, "effectiveness" is defined as to what extent the measures reduces incidental catch of seabirds; "cost" is defined as the initial cost or investment and any ongoing operational costs.

Other technical options are currently under development and fishers and researchers in the field may develop new mitigation measures, so the list of measures is likely to increase over time.

If effectiveness of mitigation measures can be improved by combining different mitigation measures or devices, each State may find it advantageous to implement different measures that are more suitable for their conditions and reflect the needs of their specific longline fisheries.

The list below should not be considered mandatory or exhaustive and FAO shall maintain a data base of measures that are in use or under development.

II. Technical Measures

1. Increase the sink rate of baits

a) Weighting the longline gear

b) Thawing bait

c) Line-setting machine

2. Below-the-water setting chute, capsule, or funnel

3. Bird-scaring line positioned over or in the area where baited hooks enter the water

4. Bait casting machine

5. Bird scaring curtain

6. Artificial baits or lures

7. Hook modification

8. Acoustic deterrent

9. Water cannon

10. Magnetic deterrent

III. Operational Measures

1. Reduce visibility of bait (Night setting)

2. Reduce the attractiveness of the vessels to seabirds

  • Concept: Reducing the attractiveness of vessels to seabirds will reduce the potential for seabirds being incidentally caught. Materials (e.g. fish discards, garbage) discharged from vessels should be at a time or in a way that makes them least available to birds or least likely to cause them harm. This includes avoidance of the dumping of discarded fish, offal, fish heads, etc. with embedded hooks. If dumping offal is unavoidable, it should be done on the opposite side of the vessel to where lines are being set or in such a manner that birds are not attracted to the vessel (e.g., at night).
  • Effectiveness: The issue of offal discharge is a complex one, and there have been conflicting results regarding effects of various procedures in the studies done to date.
  • Cost: Low; in some situations costs may be associated with providing for offal containment or reconfiguration of offal discharge systems on the vessel.

3. Area and seasonal closures

  • Concept: Reduce incidental catch of seabirds when concentrations of breeding or foraging seabirds can be avoided.
  • Effectiveness: Area and seasonal closures could be effective (such as in high density foraging areas or during the period of chick care when parental duties limit the distances adults can fly from breeding sites) although displacement of fishing fleet to other seabird areas needs to be considered.
  • Cost: Unknown, but a restriction on fishing by area or season may effect fishing capacity.

4. Give preferential licensing to vessels that use mitigation measures that do not require compliance monitoring

  • Concept: Incentive provided for effective use of mitigation measures that do not require compliance monitoring.
  • Effectiveness: May be highly effective in stimulating the use of mitigation measures and development of fishing systems that reduce incidental catch of seabirds
  • Cost: Unknown.

5. Release live birds

  • Concept: If despite the precautions, seabirds are incidentally caught, every reasonable effort should be made to ensure that birds brought onboard alive are released alive and that when possible hooks should be removed without jeopardizing the life of the birds
  • Effectiveness: Depends on the number of birds brought onboard alive and this is considered small by comparison to the numbers killed in line setting.
  • Cost: Unknown


APPENDIX E.2

International Plan of Action
for the Conservation and Management of Sharks

Introduction

1. For centuries artisanal fishermen have conducted fishing for sharks sustainably in coastal waters, and some still do. However, during recent decades modern technology in combination with access to distant markets have caused an increase in effort and yield of shark catches, as well as an expansion of the areas fished.

2. There is concern over the increase of shark catches and the consequences which this has for the populations of some shark species in several areas of the world’s oceans. This is because sharks often have a close stock-recruitment relationship, long recovery times in response to over-fishing (low biological productivity because of late sexual maturity; few off-spring, albeit with low natural mortality) and complex spatial structures (size/sex segregation and seasonal migration).

3. The current state of knowledge of sharks and the practices employed in shark fisheries cause problems in the conservation and management of sharks due to lack of available catch, effort, landings and trade data, as well as limited information on the biological parameters of many species and their identification. In order to improve knowledge on the state of shark stocks and facilitate the collection of the necessary information, adequate funds are required for research and management.

4. The prevailing view is that it is necessary to better manage directed shark catches and certain multispecies fisheries in which sharks constitute a significant bycatch. In some cases the need for management may be urgent.

5. A few countries have specific management plans for their shark catches and their plans include control of access, technical measures including strategies for reduction of shark bycatches and support for full use of sharks. However, given the wide-ranging distribution of sharks, including on the high seas, and the long migration of many species, it is increasingly important to have international cooperation and coordination of shark management plans. At the present time there are few international management mechanisms effectively addressing the capture of sharks.

6. The Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization, the Sub-regional Fisheries Commission of West African States, the Latin American Organization for Fishery Development, the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna and the Oceanic Fisheries Programme of the Pacific Community have initiated efforts encouraging member countries to collect information about sharks, and in some cases developed regional databases for the purpose of stock assessment.

7. Noting the increased concern about the expanding catches of sharks and their potential negative impacts on shark populations, a proposal was made at the Twenty-second Session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in March 1997 that FAO organize an expert consultation, using extra-budgetary funds, to develop Guidelines leading to a Plan of Action to be submitted at the next Session of the Committee aimed at improved conservation and management of sharks.

8. This International Plan of Action for Conservation and Management of Sharks (IPOA-SHARKS) has been developed through the meeting of the Technical Working Group on the Conservation and Management of Sharks in Tokyo from 23 to 27 April 19984 and the Consultation on Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries held in Rome from 26 to 30 October 1998 and its preparatory meeting held in Rome from 22 to 24 July 19985.

9. The IPOA-SHARKS consists of the nature and scope, principles, objective and procedures for implementation (including attachments) specified in this document.

Nature and Scope

10. The IPOA-SHARKS is voluntary. It has been elaborated within the framework of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries as envisaged by Article 2 (d). The provisions of Article 3 of the Code of Conduct apply to the interpretation and application of this document and its relationship with other international instruments. All concerned States6 are encouraged to implement it.

11. For the purposes of this document, the term "shark" is taken to include all species of sharks, skates, rays and chimaeras (Class Chondrichtyes), and the term "shark catch" is taken to include directed, bycatch, commercial, recreational and other forms of taking sharks.

12. The IPOA-SHARKS encompasses both target and non-target catches.

Guiding principles

13. Participation. States that contribute to fishing mortality on a species or stock should participate in its management.

14. Sustaining stocks. Management and conservation strategies should aim to keep total fishing mortality for each stock within sustainable levels by applying the precautionary approach.

15. Nutritional and socio-economic considerations. Management and conservation objectives and strategies should recognize that in some low-income food-deficit regions and/or countries, shark catches are a traditional and important source of food, employment and/or income. Such catches should be managed on a sustainable basis to provide a continued source of food, employment and income to local communities.

Objective

16. The objective of the IPOA-SHARKS is to ensure the conservation and management of sharks and their long-term sustainable use.

Implementation

17. The IPOA-SHARKS applies to States in the waters of which sharks are caught by their own or foreign vessels and to States the vessels of which catch sharks on the high seas.

18. States should adopt a national plan of action for conservation and management of shark stocks (Shark-plan) if their vessels conduct directed fisheries for sharks or if their vessels regularly catch sharks in non-directed fisheries. Suggested contents of the Shark-plan are found in Appendix A. When developing a Shark-plan, experience of subregional and regional fisheries management organizations should be taken into account, as appropriate.

19. Each State is responsible for developing, implementing and monitoring its Shark-plan.

20. States should strive to have a Shark-plan by the COFI Session in 2001.

21. States should carry out a regular assessment of the status of shark stocks subject to fishing so as to determine if there is a need for development of a shark plan. This assessment should be guided by article 6.13 of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The assessment should be reported as a part of each relevant State's Shark-plan. Suggested contents of a shark assessment report are found in Appendix B. The assessment would necessitate consistent collection of data, including inter alia commercial data and data leading to improved species identification and, ultimately, the establishment of abundance indices. Data collected by States should, where appropriate, be made available to, and discussed within the framework of, relevant subregional and regional fisheries organizations and FAO. International collaboration on data collection and data sharing systems for stock assessments is particularly important in relation to transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas shark stocks.

22. The Shark-plan should aim to:

  • Ensure that shark catches from directed and non-directed fisheries are sustainable;
  • Assess threats to shark populations, determine and protect critical habitats and implement harvesting strategies consistent with the principles of biological sustainability and rational long-term economic use;
  • Identify and provide special attention, in particular to vulnerable or threatened shark stocks;
  • Improve and develop frameworks for establishing and co-ordinating effective consultation involving all stakeholders in research, management and educational initiatives within and between States;
  • Minimize unutilized incidental catches of sharks;
  • Contribute to the protection of biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function;
  • Minimize waste and discards from shark catches in accordance with article 7.2.2.(g) of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (for example, requiring the retention of sharks from which fins are removed);
  • Encourage full use of dead sharks;
  • Facilitate improved species-specific catch and landings data and monitoring of shark catches;
  • Facilitate the identification and reporting of species-specific biological and trade data.

23. States which implement the Shark-plan should regularly, at least every four years, assess its implementation for the purpose of identifying cost-effective strategies for increasing its effectiveness.

24. States which determine that a Shark-plan is not necessary should review that decision on a regular basis taking into account changes in their fisheries, but as a minimum, data on catches, landings and trade should be collected.

25. States, within the framework of their respective competencies and consistent with international law, should strive to cooperate through regional and subregional fisheries organizations or arrangements, and other forms of cooperation, with a view to ensuring the sustainability of shark stocks, including, where appropriate, the development of subregional or regional shark plans.

26. Where transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas stocks of sharks are exploited by two or more States, the States concerned should strive to ensure effective conservation and management of the stocks.

27. States should strive to collaborate through FAO and through international arrangements in research, training and the production of information and educational material.

28. States should report on the progress of the assessment, development and implementation of their Shark-plans as part of their biennial reporting to FAO on the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.

Role of FAO

29. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, and as part of its Regular Programme activities, support States in the implementation of the IPOA-SHARKS, including the preparation of Shark-plans.

30. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, support development and implementation of Shark-plans through specific, in-country technical assistance projects with Regular Programme funds and by use of extra-budgetary funds made available to the Organization for this purpose. FAO will provide a list of experts and a mechanism of technical assistance to countries in connection with development of Shark-plans.

31. FAO will, through COFI, report biennially on the state of progress in the implementation of the IPOA-SHARKS.



Annex A

SUGGESTED CONTENTS OF A SHARK-PLAN

I. BACKGROUND

When managing fisheries for sharks, it is important to consider that the state of knowledge of sharks and the practices employed in shark catches may cause problems in the conservation and management of sharks, in particular:

  • Taxonomic problems
  • Inadequate available data on catches, effort and landings for sharks
  • Difficulties in identifying species after landing
  • Insufficient biological and environmental data
  • Lack of funds for research and management of sharks
  • Little coordination on the collection of information on transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas stocks of sharks
  • Difficulty in achieving shark management goals in multispecies fisheries in which sharks are caught.

II. CONTENT OF THE SHARK-PLAN

The Technical Guidelines on the Conservation and Management of Sharks, under development by FAO, provide detailed technical guidance, both on the development and the implementation of the Shark-plan. Guidance will be provided on:

  • Monitoring.

  • Data collection and analysis.

  • Research.

  • Building of human capacity.

  • Implementation of management measures.

The Shark-plan should contain:

A. Description of the prevailing state of:

  • Shark stocks, populations;

  • Associated fisheries; and,

  • Management framework and its enforcement.

B. The objective of the Shark-plan.

C. Strategies for achieving objectives. The following are illustrative examples of what could be included:

  • Ascertain control over access of fishing vessels to shark stocks.

  • Decrease fishing effort in any shark where catch is unsustainable.

  • Improve the utilization of sharks caught.

  • Improve data collection and monitoring of shark fisheries.

  • Train all concerned in identification of shark species.

  • Facilitate and encourage research on little known shark species.

  • Obtain utilization and trade data on shark species.


Annex B

SUGGESTED CONTENTS OF A SHARK ASSESSMENT REPORT

A shark assessment report should inter alia contain the following information:

  • Past and present trends for:
    • Effort: directed and non-directed fisheries; all types of fisheries;

    • Yield: physical and economic.

  • Status of stocks

  • Existing management measures:
    • Control of access to fishing grounds.

    • Technical measures (including by-catch reduction measures, the existence of sanctuaries and closed seasons).

    • Others.

    • Monitoring, control and surveillance.

  • Effectiveness of management measures.

  • Possible modifications of management measures.


APPENDIX E.3

INTERNATIONAL PLAN OF ACTION FOR THE
MANAGEMENT OF FISHING CAPACITY

Introduction

1. In the context of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its overall objective of sustainable fisheries, the issues of excess fishing capacity in world fisheries is an increasing concern. Excessive fishing capacity is a problem that, among others, contributes substantially to overfishing, the degradation of marine fisheries resources, the decline of food production potential, and significant economic waste.

2. The Code of Conduct provides that States should take measures to prevent or eliminate excess fishing capacity and should ensure that levels of fishing effort are commensurate with sustainable use of fishery resources.

3. At its last Session in 1997, the Committee on Fisheries (COFI), requested FAO to address the issue of fishing capacity. FAO organized a Technical Working Group on the Management of Fishing Capacity in La Jolla, USA, from 15 to 18 April 1998. A subsequent FAO consultation was held in Rome from 26 to 30 October 1998, preceded by a preparatory meeting from 22 to 24 July 1998.

PART I - Nature and Scope of the International Plan of Action

4. The International Plan of Action is voluntary. It has been elaborated within the framework of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries as envisaged by Article 2 (d). The provisions of Article 3 of the Code apply to the interpretation and application of this International Plan of Action and its relationship with other international instruments.

5. This document is in furtherance of the commitment of all States7 to implement the Code of Conduct. States and regional8 fisheries organizations should apply this document consistently with international law and within the framework of the respective competencies of the organizations concerned.

6. The International Plan of Action constitutes an element of fishery conservation and sustainable management.

PART II - Objective and Principles

7. The immediate objective of the International Plan of Action is for States and regional fisheries organizations, to achieve world-wide preferably by 2003, but not later than 2005, an efficient, equitable and transparent management of fishing capacity. Inter alia, States and regional fisheries organizations confronted with an overcapacity problem, where capacity is undermining achievement of long-term sustainability outcomes, should endeavour initially to limit at present level and progressively reduce the fishing capacity applied to affected fisheries. Where long-term sustainability outcomes are being achieved, States and regional fisheries organizations nevertheless need to exercise caution to avoid growth in capacity undermining long-term sustainability objectives.

8. The above objective may be achieved through a series of actions related to four major strategies:

    i. The conduct of national, regional and global assessments of capacity and improvement of the capability for monitoring fishing capacity;

    ii. The preparation and implementation of national plans to effectively manage fishing capacity and of immediate actions for coastal fisheries requiring urgent measures;

    iii.The strengthening of regional fisheries organizations and related mechanisms for improved management of fishing capacity at regional and global levels;

    iv. Immediate actions for major transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas fisheries requiring urgent measures.

These strategies may be implemented through complementary mechanisms to promote implementation of this international Plan of Action: awareness building and education, technical co-operation at the international level, and co-ordination.

9. The management of fishing capacity should be based on the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and take into consideration the following major principles and approaches:

    v. Participation: The International Plan of Action should be implemented by States either directly, in co-operation with other States, or through FAO in co-operation with other appropriate intergovernmental organizations, including regional fisheries organizations. States and regional fisheries organizations, as appropriate, are encouraged to give effect to it and to inform FAO of actions taken to implement it. FAO will regularly provide information about its implementation.

    vi. Phased implementation: The management of fishing capacity on the basis of national and regional plans should be achieved through the following three phases: assessment and diagnosis (preliminary analysis to be completed by the end of 2000), adoption of management measures (preliminary steps to be adopted by the end of 2002) and periodic adjustment of such assessment and diagnosed measures, as appropriate. States and regional fisheries organizations should complete these steps and progressively implement by 2005 the complementary measures specified in the International Plan of Action.

    vii. Holistic approach: The management of fishing capacity should consider all factors affecting capacity in both national and international waters;

    viii. Conservation. The management of fishing capacity should be designed to achieve the conservation and sustainable use of fish stocks and the protection of the marine environment consistent with the precautionary approach, the need to minimize by-catch, waste and discard and ensure selective and environmentally safe fishing practices, the protection of biodiversity in the marine environment, and the protection of habitat, in particular habitats of special concern.

    ix. Priority: Priority should be given to managing the fishing capacity in those fisheries in which there already unequivocally exists overfishing;

    x. New technologies: The management of fishing capacity should be designed so that it takes into account the incorporation of environmentally sound and evolving technology in all areas of capture fisheries.

    xi. Mobility: The management of fishing capacity should encourage efficient use of fishing capacity and discourage mobility when it negatively affects sustainability and take due account of socio-economic performances in other fisheries;

    xii.Transparency: The International Plan of Action should be implemented in a transparent manner in accordance with Article 6.13 of the Code of Conduct.

10. The implementation of the International Plan of Action should be based on the Code of Conduct, particularly Article 5, in relation to enhancing the ability of developing countries, to develop their own fisheries as well as to participate in high seas fisheries, including access to such fisheries, in accordance with their legitimate rights and their obligations under international law.

PART III - Urgent Actions

Section I: Assessment and monitoring of fishing capacity

Measurement of fishing capacity

11. States should support coordinated efforts and research at national, regional and global levels to better understand the fundamental aspects of issues related to the measurement and monitoring of fishing capacity.

12. States should support the organization by FAO of a technical consultation to be held as early as possible in 1999 on the definition and measurement of fishing capacity and the subsequent preparation of technical guidelines for data collection and analysis, noting that the result of this consultation should provide specific guidance for preliminary assessments of fishing capacity and excess fishing capacity at national, regional and global levels.

Diagnosis and identification of fisheries and fleets requiring urgent measures

13. States should proceed, by the end of 2000, with a preliminary assessment of the fishing capacity deployed at the national level in relation to all the fleets of principal fisheries and update this assessment periodically.

14. States should proceed, by the end of 2001, with the systematic identification of national fisheries and fleets requiring urgent measures and update this analysis periodically.

15. States should cooperate, within the same time frame, in the organization of similar preliminary assessments of fishing capacity at the regional level (within the relevant regional fisheries organizations or in collaboration with them, as appropriate) and at the global level (in collaboration with FAO) for transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas fisheries, as well as in the identification of regional or global fisheries and fleets requiring urgent measures.

Establishment of records of fishing vessels

16. States should support FAO in the development of appropriate and compatible standards for records of fishing vessels.

17. States should develop and maintain appropriate and compatible national records of fishing vessels, further specifying conditions for access to information.

18. While awaiting the entry into force of the Agreement to Promote Compliance with International Conservation and Management Measures by Fishing Vessels on the High Seas (Compliance Agreement), States should support the establishment by FAO by the end of 2000 of an international record of fishing vessels operating in the high seas, following the model indicated in the Compliance Agreement.

Section II: Preparation and implementation of national plans

Development of national plans and policies

19. States should develop, implement and monitor national plans of action for managing fishing capacity, taking into account, inter alia, the effect of different resource management systems on fishing capacity.

20. States should develop the means to monitor fishing capacity systematically and accurately, and to regularly assess any imbalance with available fishery resources and management objectives.

21. States should develop, adopt and make public, by the end of 2002, national plans for the management of fishing capacity and, if required, reduce fishing capacity in order to balance fishing capacity with available resources on a sustainable basis. These should be based on an assessment of fish stocks and giving particular attention to cases requiring urgent measures and taking immediate steps to address the management of fishing capacity for stocks recognized as significantly overfished.

22. States should give due consideration, in the development of national plans, to socio-economic requirements, including the consideration of alternative sources of employment and livelihood to fishing communities which must bear the burden of reductions in fishing capacity.

23. When it has been found that a national plan to manage capacity is not necessary, States should ensure that the matter of fishing capacity is addressed in an ongoing manner in fishery management.

24. At least every four years, States should review the implementation of their national plans to manage capacity for the purpose of identifying cost effective strategies for increasing effectiveness.

Subsidies and economic incentives

25. When developing their national plans for the management of fishing capacity, States should assess the possible impact of all factors, including subsidies, contributing to overcapacity on the sustainable management of their fisheries, distinguishing between factors, including subsidies, which contribute to overcapacity and unsustainability and those which produce a positive effect or are neutral.

26. States should reduce and progressively eliminate all factors, including subsidies and economic incentives and other factors which contribute, directly or indirectly, to the build-up of excessive fishing capacity thereby undermining the sustainability of marine living resources, giving due regard to the needs of artisanal fisheries.

Regional considerations

27. States should cooperate, where appropriate, through regional fisheries organizations or arrangements and other forms of co-operation, with a view to ensuring the effective management of fishing capacity.

28. States should strive to collaborate through FAO and through international arrangements in research, training and the production of information and educational material aiming to promote effective management of fishing capacity.

Section III: International considerations

29. States should consider participating in international agreements which relate to the management of fishing capacity, and in particular, the Compliance Agreement and the Agreement for the Implementation of the Provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 relating to the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks.

30. States should support co-operation and the exchange of information among all regional fisheries organizations in accordance with their procedures.

31. States should take steps to manage the fishing capacity of their vessels involved in high seas fisheries and cooperate, as appropriate with other States, in reducing the fishing capacity applied to overfished high seas stocks.

32. States should improve, through regional fisheries organizations where appropriate, and in collaboration with FAO, the collection of data on catches on the high seas as well as in the coastal area by their fleet.

33. States should recognize the need to deal with the problem of those States which do not fulfil their responsibilities under international law as flag States with respect to their fishing vessels, and in particular those which do not exercise effectively their jurisdiction and control over their vessels which may operate in a manner that contravenes or undermines the relevant rules of international law and international conservation and management measures. States should also support multilateral co-operation to ensure that such flag States contribute to regional efforts to manage fishing capacity.

34. States should be encouraged to become members of regional fisheries organizations or arrangements, or agree to apply the conservation and management measures established by such organizations or arrangements to their vessels.

35. States should promote, with the assistance of FAO, the exchange of information about the fishing activity of vessels which do not comply with conservation and management measures adopted by regional fisheries organizations and arrangements, consistent with Article VI of the Compliance Agreement.

36. Anticipating the entry into force of the Compliance Agreement, States should strive to apply the provisions of Article III of that Agreement.

37. States should ensure that no transfer of capacity to the jurisdiction of another State should be carried out without the express consent and formal authorization of that State.

38. States should, in compliance with their duties as flag States, avoid approving the transfer of vessels flying their flag to high seas areas where such transfers are inconsistent with responsible fishing under the Code of Conduct.

Section IV: Immediate actions for major international fisheries requiring urgent measures

39. States should take immediate steps to address the management of fishing capacity for international fisheries requiring urgent attention, with priority being given to those harvesting transboundary, straddling, highly migratory and high seas stocks which are significantly overfished.

40. Within the framework of their respective competencies, States should act individually, bilaterally and multilaterally, as appropriate, to reduce substantially9 the fleet capacity applied to these resources as part of management strategies to restore overfished stocks to sustainable levels considering, in addition to the other relevant provisions of the International Plan of Action:

    i. The economic importance of the fleets catching overfished stocks and the need to limit these fleets to a level commensurate with stock sustainability and economic viability; and

    ii.The use of appropriate measures to control the transfer of overcapacity to fully exploited or overexploited fisheries, taking into consideration the condition of the fish stocks.

PART IV: Mechanisms to promote implementation

Awareness building and education

41. States should develop information programmes at national, regional and global levels to increase awareness about the need for the management of fishing capacity, and the cost and benefits resulting from adjustments in fishing capacity.

Scientific and technical co-operation

42. States should support the exchange of scientific and technical information on issues related to the management of fishing capacity and promote its world-wide availability using existing regional and global fora.

43. States should support training and institutional strengthening and consider providing financial, technical and other assistance to developing countries on issues related to the management of fishing capacity.

Reporting

44. States should report to FAO on progress on assessment, development and implementation of their plans for the management of fishing capacity as part of their biennial reporting to FAO on the Code of Conduct.

Role of FAO

45. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, collect all relevant information and data which might serve as a basis for further analysis aimed at identifying factors contributing to overcapacity such as, inter alia, lack of input and output control, unsustainable fishery management methods and subsidies which contribute to overcapacity.

46. FAO will, as and to the extent directed by its Conference, and as part of its Regular Programme activities, support States in the implementation of their national plans for the management of fishing capacity.

47. FAO will, as directed by its Conference, support development and implementation of national plans for the management of fishing capacity through specific, in-country technical assistance projects with Regular Programme funds and by use of extra-budgetary funds made available to the Organization for this purpose.

48. FAO will, through COFI, report biennially on the state of progress in the implementation of the International Plan of Action.




1 See "Report of the Technical Working Group on Reduction of Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries". Tokyo, Japan, 25-27 March 1998. FAO Fisheries Report No. 585.
2 See report: "Preparatory Meeting for the Consultation on the Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries". Rome, 22–24 July, 1998. FAO Fisheries Report No. 584.
3 In this document the term "State" includes Members and non-members of FAO and applies mutatis mutandis also to "fishing entities" other than States.
4 See: "Report of the FAO Technical Working Group on the Conservation and Management of Sharks". Tokyo, Japan, 23-27 April 1998. FAO Fisheries Report No. 583.
5 See Report: "Preparatory Meeting for the Consultation on the Management of Fishing Capacity, Shark Fisheries and Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline Fisheries." Rome, 22-24 July, 1998. FAO Fisheries Report No. 584.
6 In this document, the term "State" includes Members and non-members of FAO and applies mutatis mutandis also to "fishing entities" other than States.
7 In this document, the term "State" includes Members and non-members of FAO and applies mutatis mutandis also to "fishing entities" other than States.
8 In this document, the term "regional" incudes sub-regional, as appropriate.
9 The required reduction would vary from fishery to fishery; e.g. a 20 to 30% reduction was mentioned for large-scale tuna long line fleet (Technical Working Group on the Management of Fishing Capacity, 15-18 April 1998, FAO Fisheries Report No. 586).