Guidelines for integrating nutrition concerns into forestry projects


Table of contents


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
COMMUNITY FORESTRY FIELD MANUAL 3
FORESTS, TREES AND PEOPLE

prepared by
Cynthia L. Ogden

edited and designed by
Carla R. S. Koppell

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 1991

Reprinted 1994, 1996

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Applications for such permission, with a statement of the purpose and extent of the reproduction, should be addressed to the Director, Publications Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100 Rome, Italy.

FAO 1991


Contents


Preface

Introduction

About the field manual

I. Forestry and nutrition

Linkages between forestry and nutrition

Contributions to nutritional well-being

Assessing nutritional well-being

II. Incorporating nutrition concerns into forestry projects

Define individual roles

Obtain background information

Identify resources and collect data
Review basic information

Define nutritional objectives

Decide on forestry and nutrition activities

Food supply
Income generation
Environmental conditions
Women's time

Use nutrition indicators to monitor and evaluate projects

Appendices

Appendix 1 Information sources

Appendix 2 Background questions

Appendix 3 Forestry Activities

Appendix 4 Possible indicators

References