Marketing of Indigenous Medicinal Plants in South Africa - A Case Study in Kwazulu-Natal













Table of Contents


by
Myles Mander

FAO - FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 1998

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© FAO 1998

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Table of Contents


FOREWORD

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1. INTRODUCTION

2. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS BY THE AUTHOR

3. METHODOLOGY

4. DEMAND FOR MEDICINAL PLANTS IN KWAZULU-NATAL

4.1 Quantity and trends in consumer demand

4.1.1 The quantity of plant material reported to be consumed
4.1.2 The quantity of plant material reported to be traded
4.1.3 Potential provincial and national consumption levels
4.1.4 Trends in the use of indigenous medicine

4.2 Market segments

4.2.1 Direct consumers and the indigenous healers' patients

4.2.1.1 The buyers - Who are they
4.2.1.2 The products purchased
4.2.1.3 The quantities demanded
4.2.1.4 The timing of purchases
4.2.1.5 The reasons for purchasing indigenous medicine
4.2.1.6 The purchasing power of consumers

4.2.2 Pharmaceutical companies

4.2.2.1 Who are the buyers
4.2.2.2 Quantities demanded
4.2.2.3 The products purchased
4.2.2.4 The timing of purchases
4.2.2.5 The reasons for purchases
4.2.2.6 The purchasing power

5. THE SUPPLY OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN KWAZULU-NATAL

5.1 Sources of supply

5.1.1 Domestic sources

5.1.1.1 Supply from wild populations in communal areas
5.1.1.2 Supply from commercial farms

5.1.2 Imports

5.2 Current and potential production
5.3 Quantities by products
5.4 Description of producers
5.5 Competition between the suppliers

6. DEMAND AND SUPPLY POTENTIAL

6.1 Opportunities

6.1.1 Demand opportunities
6.1.2 Supply opportunities

6.2 Constraints
6.3 Potential

6.3.1 The scenarios

6.3.1.1 Scenario 1 - No intervention - A continuation of the current trends
6.3.1.2 Scenario 2 - Industry driven intervention - Where big business takes the initiative
6.3.1.3 Scenario 3 - Collaborative intervention - Where current market players, business and government collaborate

6.3.2 Summary of potential opportunities

7. ANALYSIS OF MAIN MARKETING FACTORS

7.1 Product description

7.1.1 Types of products
7.1.2 Processing of products
7.1.3 Grades, qualities and certification
7.1.4 Packaging

7.2 Channels of distribution

7.2.1 Channels of marketing

7.2.1.1 The gatherers and street traders
7.2.1.2 The indigenous healers
7.2.1.3 The shop traders
7.2.1.4 The wholesale/mail-order supplier
7.2.1.5 Major pharmaceutical companies

7.2.2 Channels of delivery

7.2.2.1 Delivery routes
7.2.2.2 Storage
7.2.2.3 Transport

7.3 Promotion

7.3.1 Promotion by the industry
7.3.2 Promotion by government

7.4 Prices

7.4.1 The rural and street market prices
7.4.2 The prices of shop traders and healers
7.4.3 The wholesale/mail-order prices
7.4.4 Summary of prices

8. INSTITUTIONAL AND INFRA-STRUCTURAL SUPPORT TO MARKETING

8.1 Institutions involved and their respective roles
8.2 Policy support
8.3 Regulatory and control mechanisms
8.4 Peoples participation
8.5 Research

8.5.1 Research in marketing

8.6 Product development
8.7 Market information systems
8.8 Education and training (capacity building)
8.9 Extension services

9. CONCLUSIONS

9.1 The demand for indigenous medicines
9.2 The supply of indigenous medicines
9.3 The marketing of indigenous medicinal plant products
9.4 Institutional support for the marketing of indigenous medicinal plants
9.5 Opportunities and constraints in the medicinal plant markets
9.6 Potential future scenarios for the medicinal plant industry

10. RECOMMENDATIONS

10.1 Recommendations for optimizing opportunities in market demand
10.2 Recommendations for optimizing opportunities in market supply
10.3 Recommendations for minimizing constraints in market supply

11. REFERENCES

12. PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

APPENDIX 1: Questionnaires used in the survey

Appendix 1a: Street traders and gatherers questionnaire
Appendix 1b: Traditional healer questionnaire
Appendix 1c: Traditional healer's customer and clinic patient questionnaire
Appendix 1d: Retailer questionnaire

Appendix 2: Model for estimating mass and number of times indigenous medicine is used in Durban

Appendix 3: Protected and specially protected indigenous species