Trade and markets
 
     

Safeguarding Food Security in Volatile
Global Markets

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Table of Contents





PART I: SETTING THE STAGE

PART II: WHY A NEW POLICY DIALOGUE IS NEEDED

PART III: INFORMATION, EXPECTATIONS AND THE ROLE OF STOCKS

PART IV: GLOBAL GOVERNANCE TOWARDS FOOD SECURITY





  1. Why volatility matters
    Adam Prakash
  2. Commodity prices: theoretical and empirical properties —Matthieu Stigler
  3. Rising vulnerability in the global food system: beyond market fundamentals
    —Adam Prakash and Christopher L. Gilbert
  4. Rising vulnerability in the global food system: environmental pressures and climate change
    —Global Perspectives Unit (FAO) and Natural Resources Department (FAO)
  5. The nature and determinants of volatility in agricultural prices: an empirical study
    —Kelvin Balcombe
  6. Emerging linkages between price volatilities in energy and agricultural markets
    —Stefan Busse, Bernhard Brümmer and Rico Ihle
  7. Grains price pass-through, 2005-09
    —Christopher L. Gilbert
  8. Price transmission and volatility spillovers in food markets
    —George Rapsomanikis
  1. The world rice market in 2007-08
    —David Dawe and Tom Slayton
  2. Country responses to turmoil in global food markets
    —Mulat Demeke, Guendalina Pangrazio and Materne Maetz
  3. International commodity agreements and their current relevance for grains price stabilization
    —Christopher L. Gilbert
  4. The fallacy of price interventions: a note on price bands and managed tarifs
    —Brian Wright and Adam Prakash
  1. The rise of commodity speculation: from villainous to venerable
    —Ann Berg
  2. The economics of information and behaviour in explaining excess volatility
    —Adam Prakash and Matthieu Stigler
  3. Storage arbitrage and commodity price volatility
    —Carlo Cafiero, Eugenio Bobenrieth and Juan Bobenrieth
  4. The role of stocks in generating volatility and crisis
    —Matthieu Stigler and Adam Prakash
  1. Global governance
    —Panos Konandreas
  2. Coping with food price surges
    —Christopher L. Gilbert and Alexandra Tabova
  3. Using futures and options to manage price volatility in food imports
    —Alexander Sarris, Piero Conforti, and Adam Prakash
  4. Using futures and options to manage price volatility in food imports: practice
    —Morgan Stanley Commodities Group
  5. The global grain contract: towards a new food security instrument
    —Ann Berg
  6. Strengthening global food market monitoring
    —Jim Greenfield and Abdolreza Abbassian
  7. Addressing the biofuels problem
    —Brian Wright
  8. Targeting the most vulnerable: implementing social safety nets
    —Zoltan Tiba, Agricultural Development Economics Division, (FAO).
  9. Targeting the most vulnerable: emergency reserves and other instruments
    —Agricultural Support Systems Division (FAO).
  10. Targeting the most vulnerable: implementing input subsidies
    —Zoltan Tiba, Agricultural Development Economics Division, (FAO).
  11. Investing towards a world free of hunger
    —Josef Schmidhuber and Jelle Bruinsma

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