Trade and markets
 

Publications on sugar

Commodity Market Review 2009-2010
The Commodity Market Review (CMR), a biennial publication of the FAO Trade and Markets Division, examines in depth issues relating to agricultural commodity market developments that are deemed by FAO as current and crucial for FAO’s member countries.

The Brazilian ethanol programme: FAO Commodity and trade policy research working paper No. 1
The sugar market in Brazil has a strong relationship with the ethanol market. The Brazilian government has now abolished all the sugar market intervention measures except for the control on the ethanol-gasoline blend ratio. In this study, implications of a change in blend ratio to the sugar markets, particularly in its production resource use is investigated by applying a newly developed Ethanol-sugar market.

Effects of trade liberalization on the world sugar market
The purpose of this report is to present and discuss findings of a study of trade liberalization on the World sugar market. The study considers the following scenarios: (a) the effects of trade liberalization from the Uruguay Round (UR), (b) the effects of complete global trade liberalization, (c) the effects of partial trade liberalization, (d) the effects of complete trade liberalization in the industrialized countries, (e) the effects of partial trade liberalization in the industrialized countries, (f) the effects of complete trade liberalization in the major developing countries (Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Republic of Korea), and (g) the effects of partial trade liberalization in the major developing countries.

FAO trade policy technical notes - No. 6. Sugar: the impact of reforms to sugar sector policies - a guide to contemporary analyses
This technical note is intended as a guide to assist in the interpretation of a range of existing analytical studies of the impact of current sugar sector policies on world market conditions and on developing country producers, and of the insights that these studies can provide (and those that they cannot) in determining the potential impacts of future reform initiatives. This is especially important in the case of the sugar sector, since recent announcements of major reforms are yet to be fully incorporated into contemporary analytical studies.