Read more about FAO in emergencies and the Typhoon Haiyan in the PhilippinesBack-to-back crises – conflict, typhoons, flooding – make it difficult for many farmers, herders and fishers in the Philippines to rebound, especially as they struggle to replace what was lost or damaged, be it seeds and tools, livestock or fishing gear. Getting vulnerable families back to producing food and earning an income – and helping them withstand the next disaster – is at the heart of FAO’s work in the Philippines.

Rebuilding livelihoods

Insecurity, poverty and frequent natural disasters prevent many people in the southern island of Mindanao from getting the food they need. Decades of conflict have uprooted thousands from their villages, sometimes more than once. Many of the displaced have begun returning home following the 2009 ceasefire, though others continue to live in evacuation centres or host communities. FAO is providing vulnerable farming families – many of whom face debt – with quality maize, rice and vegetable seeds, hand tools, fertilizers, goats, chickens and fishing gear so they can restart their livelihoods. FAO is also helping farmers, both men and women, to increase their production skills through hands-on training and to develop new skills in group management.

Becoming more resilient to disasters

To say that the Philippines is prone to natural disasters is an understatement. On average, 20 typhoons strike the country each year, in addition to occasional landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions – all of which chip away at farmers’ and fishers’ ability to earn a living. FAO is training farmers on improved agricultural practices to raise yields and reduce the risk of crop failure, including the use of saline- and drought-resistant seeds, labour-saving technologies and better water and soil management. Likewise, it is encouraging sustainable fisheries management and working to improve the flow of timely weather- and agriculture-related information.


More about the country

 - In Eastern Visayas region alone, Typhoon Haiyan damaged or destroyed 33 million coconut stands, affecting 1.7 million people in the coconut sector. To help the Government more
 - Coconuts are one of the most important crops in the Philippines. The country is the second largest coconut producer in the world, but after Typhoon Haiyan more
 - The island of Tubabao, off the coast of Guiuan in Eastern Samar was one of the first areas in the Philippines to be hit by super more
 - The island of Tubabao, off the coast of Guiuan in Eastern Samar was one of the first areas in the Philippines to be hit by super more
 - To restore food security and livelihoods of small-scale coconut farming households severely affected by Typhoon Haiyan in Regions VI and VIII by diversifying sources of income more
 - To improve the food security of the most vulnerable internally displaced and flood-affected farming households of Maguindanao province.
 - Featured Stories: Asia-Pacific region achieves MDG hunger target, but millions still chronically hungry Three new projects launched to restore agricultural livelihoods and food security in Mindanao IPC chronic food more
 - On 10-11 June 2015, FAO conducted a Training on Fisheries and Aquaculture Emergency Response Guidance in the island municipality of Coron, Palawan, the Republic of the more
 - More than one year on from Typhoon Haiyan, farmers and fishers in the Visayas region of the Philippines are rebuilding their lives. The typhoon caused significant more
 - Agriculture-dependent families in the central Mindanao region of the Philippines are still reeling from the residual impacts of conflict, drought and flooding that affected them during the first half of 2015.  In more