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Crisis Management Centre – Animal Health

Crisis Management Centre – Animal Health

Transboundary animal diseases have the ability to rapidly spread over large geographical areas and can have a devastating impact on animal productivity and production, trade, human health, and consequently on the economic development, livelihoods and food and nutrition security of populations.

The Crisis Management Centre – Animal Health (CMC-AH) is FAO’s rapid response mechanism to animal disease emergencies. The CMC-AH is a joint arm of FAO’s Animal Production and Health and Emergency and Rehabilitation Divisions. Established in partnership with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the CMC-AH fields rapid response missions to countries to help assess epidemiologic situations, diagnose outbreaks of animal diseases, and set up immediate measures to prevent or stop disease spread.

With a global network of veterinary and operations experts within FAO and partner organizations, the CMC-AH is able to rapidly mobilize and deploy response teams to any region of the world. The Centre works closely with the Global Early Warning System (GLEWS) and the Emergency Prevention System (EMPRES) to continuously track and analyze the animal disease situation worldwide, and operates in constant collaboration with OIE and World Health Organization (WHO) to complement FAO’s technical expertise at every step of the response.

How the CMC-AH works

  1. Tracking and planning
    The CMC-AH monitors animal health crises and anticipates responses using intelligence from GLEWS. The centre continually plans for deployment and works with partners worldwide to rapidly mobilize teams of experts.

  2. Deployment
    Once deployed, mission teams provide affected countries with targeted expertise to control epidemiological situations or outbreaks. Where needed, the CMC-AH also assists with mobilizing new resources.

  3. Transition
    The consequences of animal disease emergencies can continue well after outbreaks occur and the CMC AH works with other FAO units to support governments to transition from emergency assistance to medium- and longer-term action plans for disease control.

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