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Congo, República Democrática del

Congo, República Democrática del

Rural communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo face steep hurdles, not least of which are armed violence, civil insecurity, poverty, acute malnutrition, limited access to natural resources and lack of basic social services. Ongoing violence has displaced 2.4 million people. FAO is working to strengthen people’s ability to produce food and earn a living – from improving access to training and resources to helping returnees and former soldiers find gainful employment in agriculture and fisheries. And in doing so, it hopes to contribute to peace-building and reconciliation.

Protecting household food security

Agricultural production in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been in steady decline, despite good potential and abundant natural resources. Farmers, uprooted from their homes by fighting or unable to afford seeds, are missing planting seasons, while displacement, looting and disease are shrinking herds. Add high staple food prices and low purchasing power and it is clear just how challenging it is, especially as the country has increased food imports to meet growing demand in its main cities. By providing quality seed, tools and technical training, FAO is working to kick-start the country’s rural economy by helping returnees, refugees and host families produce and sell more food, as well as former soldiers build new, productive lives.

Creating income opportunities for women

There are twice as many poor women as poor men in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Limited access to inputs, land and services makes it difficult for women to earn a viable living. Many are victims of sexual violence, often shunned by their families and communities. FAO is working with partners to create new opportunities for women in agriculture, including in processing and marketing, and helping them to access land, productive resources, technical assistance and financing. Farmer field and life schools, which train farmers on agricultural techniques, nutrition and HIV, have been an excellent resource for helping women affected by violence reintegrate into their communities.

Getting goods to market

The poor state of the country’s roads, river ways and railways makes it difficult for many farmers to get to markets. FAO is helping to build storage facilities, like community granaries, and improve access to transportation. In addition to providing high-yielding seed and assisting people to produce quality seed, FAO is supporting farmer organizations to process and market what they produce. One way is through the World Food Programme’s Purchase for Progress project, which buys staple grains from low-income farmers, providing them with a reliable market at competitive prices. Another way is by improving the feeder roads that link food-producing areas to those markets.

Pinpointing food needs

The size of the Democratic Republic of Congo and the complexity and diversity of its humanitarian crises require coordinated, strategic and needs-based responses. FAO and the World Food Programme continue to co-lead the Food Security Cluster to improve coordination and ensure timely and accurate information on food and nutrition needs. Likewise, FAO uses the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) to classify the nature and scale of food insecurity throughout the country. According to the latest IPC reports, 6.3 million people are in urgent need of food and livelihood assistance – a figure that could rise as violence continues to displace more people from their homes and farms.

 

More about the country

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 - Contribuer à améliorer la réponse humanitaire rapide dans les zones de conflits en insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle. Renforcer le stock d’urgence d’intrants agricoles afin de permettre ...read more
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 - Cultivated mainly on marginal lands by small-scale farmers, cassava is an inexpensive and essential part of the diet of vulnerable communities across Africa. Millions of people ...read more
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 - The future of cassava, one of Africa’s most promising and climate-resilient crops, may be under threat if efforts to renew the fight against diseases affecting the ...read more
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 - Contribuer à rétablir les moyens d’existence des populations affectées par les inondations dans les territoires de Kasangulu, Madimba et Mbanza Ngungu au Bas-Congo par la mise ...read more
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 - Cassava production is under threat as two viruses are raging through the fields of small-scale farmers in East and Central Africa. The Regional Cassava Initiative, coordinated ...read more
22/08/2013
 - Cassava production is under threat as two viruses are raging through the fields of small-scale farmers in East and Central Africa. The Regional Cassava Initiative, coordinated ...read more
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 - Contribuer à la réduction de la mortalité et de la morbidité dues à la malnutrition aiguë chez 3 500 ménages vivant dans les quatre aires de ...read more
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 - Cultivated mainly on marginal lands by small-scale farmers, cassava is an inexpensive and essential part of the diet of vulnerable communities across Africa. Millions of people ...read more
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 - Upholding cassava's potential in Africa: 10 - 12 September 2013  During the course of the last decade, cassava production in East and Central Africa has been hampered ...read more
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