Bangladesh (le)

Bangladesh (le)

Cox’s Bazar is a vulnerable district in southeastern Bangladesh where the level of food insecurity is alarming. The district is home to 2.65 million Bangladeshis, and it hosts the largest refugee population in the world, including 855 000 Rohingya refugees escaping violence in Myanmar. Some 1.3 million people of both refugee and host community populations are in need of food security and livelihoods assistance.

The speed and scale of the influx of refugees has placed extensive pressure on public services in host communities and may have a long-lasting environmental impact. Firewood collection has exacerbated ongoing serious deforestation in areas surrounding refugee camps, resulting in a dwindling supply of cooking fuel. The majority do not have sufficient food, cooking fuel or cooking utensils. Both refugee and host communities continue to adopt negative coping mechanisms to meet basic food needs.

The Rohingya humanitarian crisis has cost the host community significantly through loss of natural resources, rises in food, cooking fuel and transportation prices, and a highly competitive labour market with greatly decreased wages. Firewood selling was previously one of the few local income-generating activities. Ensuring livelihood opportunities for host communities is vital to maintain peace and foster social cohesion. The situation for both communities is increasingly dangerous during the cyclone season and monsoon rains.

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worsened the already dire humanitarian situation. Disease containment measures, including movement restrictions, caused income shocks, and reduced food demand. Poorer households in particular have been purchasing much less and risk being forced to adopt extreme coping strategies to sustain their food consumption. 

In the summer of 2020, heavy monsoon rainfall in northern, northeastern and southeastern Bangladesh lead to flooding in one-quarter of the country. Severe flooding impacted at least 5.4 million people, displaced 11 000 households, killed 135 people, and inundated more than half of the markets in the country. The flooding damaged agricultural land and flood protection infrastructure, resulting in the disruption of agricultural production.

Together with the Government of Bangladesh and humanitarian partners, FAO is linking local production to expanding food markets to generate income and improve nutrition, as well as working to mitigate the impact of disasters, such as floods and landslidesCash-for-work activities in watershed management is helping to stabilize the land, prevent topsoil loss and re-establish forests.

FAO is working with partners in the Food Security Sector to: 

  • Promote portable skills development opportunities for Rohingya refugees and enhance the livelihoods and resilience of host communities. 
  • Support social cohesion through enhancement and restoration of eco systems and natural resources. 

COVID-19 Response

The COVID-19 pandemic is a pressing challenge in Bangladesh due to the country’s high population density and vulnerable health system, coupled with relatively low levels of awareness in communities about how to take action to break the chain of viral transmission. As part of the One United Nations (UN) response mechanism, FAO’s Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) Country Team Leader is leading the UN Interagency Support Team for the COVID-19 emergency response and is supporting the UN COVID-19 Crisis Management Team (CCMT). The CCMT has developed a One UN approach under the UN Resident Coordinator and the World Health Organization Representative, enabling full engagement of UN Country Teams to support the Country Preparedness and Response guidance developed by the Government of Bangladesh. FAO has played a crucial role in supporting the Government’s response in four key ways: 

  1. Supporting the coordination of a multisectoral collaborative approach for identifying and addressing priority risks.
  2. Developing and deploying community-based interventions with partners to slow viral transmission and train a new generation of health champions.
  3. Conducting fit-for-purpose epidemiological modelling to drive evidence-based policymaking, including early adoption of mandatory public mask wearing.
  4. Rapidly building laboratory capacity for COVID-19 diagnostics.

Controlling transboundary animal diseases

FAO animal health is building capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats. Activities are implemented by FAO’s ECTAD unit in Bangladesh and 34 other countries. Many communities rely on animals for their livelihoods as well as their food security and nutrition. When diseases jump from animals to humans they can spread around the world in a matter of hours or days, posing a threat to global health security. FAO is working to reduce the impact of animal diseases on lives and livelihoods, and helping to stop emergence and spread of potential pandemics at source.

 

Plus sur le pays

 - To strengthen the ongoing environmental actions and build the capacity of the Government of Bangladesh to mitigate environmental degradation.
24/12/2020
 - The world is standing on the precipice of the greatest food crisis in generations...
15/12/2020
 - The degradation of land within and near the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, was a crisis within a crisis, but FAO has been at the forefront ...en lire plus
22/10/2020
 - The degradation of land within and near the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, was a crisis within a crisis, but FAO has been at the forefront ...en lire plus
20/10/2020
 - FAO’s component of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19 The world is standing on the precipice of the greatest food crisis in generations. Worldwide, people and ...en lire plus
17/08/2020
 - As floods threaten the nation, FAO teams up with UN allies in anticipatory action “Wherever you look, there is water. You see people wading through knee-deep floods ...en lire plus
07/08/2020
 - Heavy monsoon rainfall, coupled with rising water levels in the three major river basins and hilly areas upstream, have led to major flooding in northern, northeastern ...en lire plus
28/07/2020
 - Overview Heavy monsoon rainfall, coupled with rising water levels in the three major river basins and hilly areas upstream, have led to major flooding in northern, northeastern ...en lire plus
28/07/2020
 - Release is the fastest funding allocation from the Central Emergency Response Fund in UN history In an innovative approach to dealing with the effects of severe flooding ...en lire plus
15/07/2020
 - FAO, in partnership with the Department of Agricultural Extension, has distributed rice seed to 24 000 farmers in Cox’s Bazar in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ...en lire plus
03/07/2020