Somalia 2017 - Putting life-saving cash in people’s pockets, rebuilding productive infrastructure

Somalia 2017 - Putting life-saving cash in people’s pockets, rebuilding productive infrastructure
Jun 2017

Markets in Somalia are functioning. There is food on their shelves – but scarcity and high prices have pushed it out of the reach of many. FAO unconditional cash relief payments and cash-for-work projects are putting desperately-needed money into the pockets of rural families at high risk. Giving people cash gives them access to food.

Even with good weather, Somalia’s agropastoral families cover only around half their cereal needs though household production. They buy the rest of their food – much of it imported. Both of last years’ harvests were neartotal failures, and by early 2017 they had worked their way through their reduced cereal stores. Since then these families have been depending on purchases to survive, often going into debt to do so. Their animals are emaciated, not producing enough milk, and can’t be sold. The seasonal farm jobs that provide up to a quarter of their yearly income have also dried up. People in rural Somalia are facing a cash crunch. They need money to access food and to avoid selling off key productive assets – and they need it now.