Myanmar floods: Food security and livelihoods still at risk, recovery must focus on building resilience for future disasters

Myanmar floods: Food security and livelihoods still at risk, recovery must focus on building resilience for future disasters
Apr 2016

The flooding and devastation caused in Myanmar by Cyclone Komen in July-August last year has exacerbated food insecurity for poor rural communities living in Myanmar’s hardest-hit regions and highlighted their vulnerability to withstand similar emergencies in the future.

An assessment mission conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN and World Food Programme six months after the floods has highlighted that additional assistance to rebuild livelihoods is urgently needed to ensure long term recovery and rehabilitation especially in remote areas, which concentrate highly vulnerable populations with little resilience and low agricultural productivity.

How FAO is helping

Through a series of livestock and agricultural recovery and resilience projects FAO will provide assistance to around 150 000 farmers and fisher people in the worst-affected areas of Rakhine, Chin and Sagaing.

  • Supporting livelihoods through agricultural input distribution (seeds, fertilizer etc.);
  • Improving, rehabilitating and/or rebuilding household and community assets;
  • Distribution of livestock (goats, chickens, ducks and pigs);
  • Mapping disaster risk reduction systems and identifying needs;
  • Training farmers in disaster risk reduction skills to enable them to recover quicker and make best use of emergency recovery inputs provided.

More support is needed

FAO recognizes its generous early donors: the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) through its Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and the Governments of Japan and Belgium who have made significant contributions to bolster FAO’s own funding.