Good Environmental Practices

Building on FAO’s work on good practices in agriculture and forestry, BEFS has compiled a set of good environmental practices that can be implemented by bioenergy feedstock producers so as to minimize the risk of negative environmental impacts from their operations, and to ensure that modern bioenergy delivers on its climate change mitigation potential.

The good practices compiled  are divided into three main groups.

  • The first group is comprised of agricultural management approaches (namely Ecosystem Approach, Conservation Agriculture and Organic Agriculture), which provide comprehensive and holistic frameworks and principles of sustainable agriculture.
  • The second group consists of integrated, sustainable agricultural and forestry management systems, namely Agroforestry, Integrated Food-Energy Systems, and Multiple Cropping Systems and Crop Rotation.
  • The third and last group includes a broad range of field-level agricultural and forestry practices that can be implemented on the ground by bioenergy feedstock producers, such as No- or Minimum Tillage, Integrated Pest Management, and Integrated Plant Nutrient Management.

For each good practice, a detailed description of the key features is provided, followed by a discussion of the potential environmental and socio-economic benefits associated with its implementation, as well as of the related challenges.

Click on the text below to open the description of each example.

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT APPROACHES

Conservation Agriculture

The Ecosystem Approach and Sustainable Crop Production Intensification, Agro-ecology and Eco-agriculture

Organic Agriculture

SUSTAINABLE INTEGRATED AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

 Agroforestry

Integrated Food-Energy Systems (IFES)

Multiple Cropping Systems and Crop Rotation

SUSTAINABLE FIELD-LEVEL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY PRACTICES

Alternatives to Slash-and-Burn

Community-Based Forest Management (CBFM)

Conservation And Sustainable Use of Plant Genetic Resources and Seeds

Forest Buffer Zone

Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

Integrated Plant Nutrient Management (IPNM)

No- or Minimum Tillage

Pollination Management

Precision Agriculture

Rainwater Harvesting and Management

Rehabilitation of Degraded Lands

Soil Cover

Sustainable Forest Harvest

Sustainable Irrigation

Wild Biodiversity Management at Farm Level



 

last updated:  Tuesday, April 8, 2014