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Colour is the key

It’s not just a matter of eating more fruits and vegetables; consuming a variety of different coloured produce is important as well.

Why? Because different colours in fruits and vegetables tend to correspond to different combinations of nutrients and other phytochemicals, each with its own array of health benefits. Reds, oranges and yellows, greens, blues and purples — the more colours on your plate, the more health-promoting properties in your diet.

Eating at least one fruit or vegetable from each of the colour groups below is also an easy way to reach the 5-a-day goal. Colours are also an easy way to teach children about dietary variety. Here are a few suggestions:

RED
Beetroot
Cherries
Guava
Red and pink grapefruits
Strawberries
Tomatoes
Watermelon

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ORANGE/YELLOW
Apricots
Carrots
Mangoes
Melon
Oranges
Papaya
Pineapple
Pumpkin
Sweet potatoes
Yellow maize

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GREEN
Amaranth
Avocado
Bok choy
Broccoli
Cucumber
Kiwi fruit
Peas
Spinach

  

BLUE/PURPLE
Blueberries
Dates
Eggplant
Grapes
Passion fruit
Plums
Prunes
Raisins

  

Last but not least....WHITE
They may be lacking in colour, but vegetables such as garlic, onions, leeks and chives are rich sources of nutrients as well.

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October 2003


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