INFORMATION ON FISHERIES MANAGEMENT OF THE KINGDOM OF NEPAL

May 1997


LOCATION AND MAIN LANDING PLACES

The major production areas are the south Terai plain for pond aquaculture; the lake area around Pokhara for capture fisheries and cage cultures. The main collection points (see map) include all larger cities in the south of the country and Pokhara town. Kathmandu valley is the major consumption area. No data is available on the volumes traded in each location.


FISHERIES POLICIES AND PLANS

Present Sector Plans for Fisheries

(not yet available in English)

The fisheries/aquaculture sub-sector plan for the Ninth 5-Year Plan, starting in the fiscal year 1997/1998, is included in the agricultural section of the plan. The main objectives for the sub-sector can be derived as follows:

  • Increased supply of animal protein;
  • Improvement of income and living standards of small-scale farmers by including them in fish production programmes;
  • Generation of self-employment in rural areas through fish farming.


MANAGEMENT MEASURES IN USE

No proper fisheries management as such exists. A licensing system for the two major lake fisheries - Pokhara and Kulekhani - is in place but is not used for resource management purposes. However, these two fisheries - including gill-netting, enclosures and cage culture - are covered by local fishermen associations which will be given responsibility and authority to regulate the fishing effort but the system is not yet fully functioning. The Fisheries Development Division currently gives recommendations to the associations with regard to, for example, closure of the fisheries during the time of spawning and prohibition of destructive fishing methods.

Licence is also formally required for sport fisheries but the regulation is not properly enforced.


ROLE OF THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR

The public sector provides a supply of fish seed for carp production through its thirteen Fisheries Development Centres (FDCs) and Fisheries Research Centres (FRCs), located throughout the country. Lately, private hatcheries have also been established in areas with relatively high density of fish farmers.

The Government provides training in fish farming at its Fisheries Training Centre (FTC) in Janakpur, mainly for Government officials and extension workers, and in the nine FDCs for private sector farmers. Extension services are offered through district agriculture development centres to which fisheries subject matter specialists are attached.

The Government is not directly involved in any fish production except for research purposes. However, many ponds are owned by local authorities and leased out to private entrepreneurs.


TRAINING LEVEL IN THE INDUSTRY

Practical training for private fish farmers is organised in the FTC/FDCs on a regular basis.

At the Department of Zoology and at the Institution for Agriculture and Animal Science at Nepal?s main university, Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu, aquaculture specialisation is offered within the main education programmes.


INVESTMENTS IN FISHERIES

No precise information is available but the total level of investment is low due to the artisanal character both of the capture fisheries and aquaculture sub-sectors. Recently, some larger private farms, mainly producing carp for local markets, have been established with yearly production capacities of some 20-30 tons.


MAIN FISHERIES REGULATIONS

(not available in English)

The legal framework, the Aquatic Animal Protection Act ("Jalchar Samrachhyan Ain 2017") does not contain adequate regulations and is consequently difficult to implement. Moreover, the Act does not, for example, address issues related to deterioration of water quality due to pollution. The Act was passed in 1962 but is currently under-going a revision taking many of the noticed deficiencies into consideration.


ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE