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Literature
        

Review of the literature is an essential starting point for any endeavour in GIS, remote sensing, or mapping. Yet, reviews are often incomplete for lack of access to the material, and consequently projects experience durations that are longer and costs that are higher than need be because the accumulated knowledge has not been tapped and taken advantage of. This page sets out to mitigate that problem. It is a gateway to the literature that represents much of the accumulated global experience on using GIS, remote sensing and mapping to solve problems and issues in marine fisheries with emphasis on EAF.

Spatial issues addressed most frequently for marine fisheries are listed in table at issues section along with the number of literature records currently contained in GISFish databases.

 
  
Marine Fisheries Documents  (316) Inland Fisheries Documents  (247) Web Resources  (114)
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TitleThe center of the center of marine shore fish biodiversity: the Philippine Islands
AuthorCarpenter, K.E. & Springer, V.G.
Date21 September 2009
Content Language(s)English
Abstract / DescriptionMultiple datasets show global maxima of marine biodiversity in the Indo-Malay-Philippines archipelago (IMPA). Analysis of distribution data for 2983 species reveals a pattern of richness on a finer scale and identifies a peak of marine biodiversity in the Central Philippine Islands and a secondary peak between Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra. This pattern is repeated in diverse habitat and higher taxa classes, most rigorously for marine shore fishes, supporting geohistorical hypotheses as the most general unifying explanations. Specific predictions based on area of overlap, area of accumulation, and area of refuge hypotheses suggest that present day eastern Indonesia, or Wallacea, should be the center of marine biodiversity. Processes suggested by these three hypotheses contribute to the diversity in this region and are also a likely explanation for the secondary center of diversity. Our study indicates, however, that there is a higher concentration of species per unit area in the Philippines than anywhere in Indonesia, including Wallacea. The Philippine center of diversity is consistent with hypotheses that this area experienced numerous vicariant and island integration events and these hypotheses warrant further testing. Special attention to marine conservation efforts in the Philippines is justified because of the identification of it as an epicenter of biodiversity and evolution.
Keywords INDO-PACIFIC BIOGEOGRAPHY; VICARIANCE; ISLAND INTEGRATION; CONSERVATION
Spatial Tool Ecosystem Modelling
Country ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Organism Division (FAO ISSCAAP) Not specified
Ecosystem Not specified
Marine Area Pacific Ocean; Indian Ocean
PublisherSpringer
Main Issue Addressed Biodiversity
Source TitleEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
Year of Publication2005
Volume/Issue Number72(4)
Number of Pages17
Entered byF. Carocci
  
63 Topics - 1740 Knowledge Objects - 404 Members - 6 Editors
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