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This report is part of FAO’s efforts to systematically link early warnings to anticipatory actions. By providing specific early action recommendations for each country, the report aims to prompt FAO and partners to proactively mitigate and/or prevent disasters before they start to adversely impact food security.

In order of intensity, for the period April to June 2019, the high risk section includes:

  • Yemen
  • South Sudan
  • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
  • The Sudan
  • Zimbabwe
  • Cameroon
  • Burkina Faso
  • Haiti
  • Afghanistan
  • Nigeria
  • African swine fever outbreak in Asia
  • Fall armyworm

FAO assesses that globally 41 countries, of which 31 in Africa, are in need of external assistance for food. Continuing conflicts remain the primary driver of high levels of severe food insecurity. Also adverse weather conditions and consequent impacts on agricultural production have acutely affected food availability and access.

New global guidelines published by the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) initiative will further hone food security and nutrition analysis processes for better and more actionable information during humanitarian crises.

After thorough consultations, food security and nutrition experts from 15 organizations have released a third version of the IPC Technical Manual. In addition to the IPC's Acute Food Insecurity scale, it incorporates two new scales, measuring chronic food insecurity and acute malnutrition. It also includes a new classification of the IPC Acute Food Insecurity scale's Phase 5, called ‘Famine Likely'.

Additionally, the updated manual introduces new data requirements to analyze areas with limited or no humanitarian access. The collection of high-quality food security and nutrition data in these locations has faced major challenges including security, legal and logistical constraints, often preventing humanitarian actors from reaching populations during emergencies

The importance of prevention cannot be overestimated. In this environment of climate change and global marketing of agricultural products, transboundary diseases, pests, and threats to the food chain are increasing, so every effort must be made to prevent them from being introduced and spreading to new environments. Prevention can save lives, save livelihoods and save money.

The purpose of this second edition of the Compendium of monthly FCC-EMPRES information sheets is to share lessons of the last two years on the prevention and control of high impact animal and aquatic diseases, plant and forest pests and diseases and food safety incidents. The Compendium outlines what FCC-EMPRES teams did, what they grasped, and what the challenges to managing transboundary threats are, so that other initiatives may benefit and build upon the knowledge and best practices shared in the stories.

As a way to support countries in taking a One Health approach to address zoonotic diseases, the guide: “Taking a Multisectoral, One Health Approach: A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries” has been jointly developed by the Tripartite organizations (FAO, OIE, and WHO). This Guide, referred to as the Tripartite Zoonotic Guide (TZG) is flexible enough to be used for other health threats at the human-animal-environment interface; for example, food safety and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The TZG provides principles, best practices and options to assist countries in achieving sustainable and functional collaboration at the human-animal-environment interface. Examples and lessons learned from countries experiences are also included.

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