Food Chain Crisis Management Framework
 

Welcome to the FCC

The human food chain is continuously threatened by the increasing number of outbreaks of aquatic and transboundary animal diseases, plant pests and diseases, and food safety emergencies.

Avian influenza, H1N1, cassava diseases, locust infestations, Salmonellosis and dioxin are some examples of threats to the human food chain that may impact human health, food security, national economies and global markets.

Through the Food Chain Crisis Management Framework (FCC), FAO addresses the risks to the human food chain through a comprehensive, interdisciplinary and institution-wide collaborative approach.

News and Events

21 Jul 2014

FAO warns of fruit bat risk in West African Ebola epidemic

Organization working to help prevent transmission of deadly virus from wildlife to humans in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone

Increased efforts are needed to improve awareness among rural communities in West Africa about the risks of contracting the Ebola virus from eating certain wildlife species including fruit bats, FAO warned today.

   
11 Jul 2014

FAO works to curb the burden of brucellosis in endemic countries ::: Case studies from Eurasia and the Near East

Volume 8 ::: July 2014 :::
Inside

1. Timely and effective assistance to countries;
2. Brucellosis control programme in Tajikistan: pathway to success;
3. A stepwise approach for progressive control of brucellosis in livestock;
4. Importance of regional cooperation and networking for brucellosis control;
5....

   
7 Jul 2014

China Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Highlights

Volume 64 ::: May 2014 :::
Inside:

1. UNTGH Working Group on Diseases at the Human-Animal Interface;
2. Strengthening collaboration between China and FAO on animal health and production: MoA and FAO review meeting held at FAO HQs in Rome;
3. Upcoming activities.

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locust plague is threatening the livelihoods of 13 million people in Madagascar