No. 7/2003


1) Climate Change Info & Events
2) Research/Publications on Forest and Climate Change
3) Climate Change News
4) New Publications:
5) Web sites of interest:
6) Climate Change Jobs
7) Readers Communication / Saying Hello


_________________________________

1) Climate Change Info & Events

_________________________________

TIMBER PLANTATIONS: IMPACTS, FUTURE VISIONS AND GLOBAL TRENDS

Date: November 13, 2003

Venue: MPB Auditorium, Nelspruit, South Africa

This Workshop is Hosted by GeaSphere -www.geasphere.co.zain Association with the TimberWatch Coalition For more information contact:

Philip Owen Email:owen@soft.co.za

Wally Menne Email:plantnet@iafrica.com

CAN AGRICULTURE AND ENERGY PARTNER USING SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION TO OFFSET GREENHOUSE GASES?

Conference to be held in College Station, US on 20-22 January.

A national forum is planned for January 20-22, 2004. The objective of the forum is to deliberate on various issues related to agriculture based GHG mitigation options to chalk out a national plan for the US agriculture and examine the modalities of establishing a carbon market. The forum will bring together important participants including representatives from the energy and agricultural industry, producer organizations, governmental and non-governmental organizations, and scientists from related fields. For further information, see:http://ageco.tamu.edu/faculty/mccarl/acs/CASMGS_CONF_send.HTM

IAI SUMMER INSTITUTE ON GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGES: CAUSES, MITIGATION ALTERNATIVES AND INTERNATIONAL ACTIONS

Piracicaba, Brazil, November 10-22, 2003

The Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) is pleased to announce its Summer Institute on Global Warming and Climate Changes: This activity will be held in collaboration with the Center for Nuclear Energy applied to Agriculture (CENA) of the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil and the Research Unit ¿Soil carbon sequestration¿ of the Research Institute for the Development (IRD) of France.

Objectives: The overarching goal of the institute is to present and discuss global climate changes, the greenhouse effect, the potential positive and negative impacts of global warming, as well as mitigation alternatives and international actions, such as international treaties and protocol, as well as to catalyze stronger interactions among academics, stakeholders, and decision-makers from the IAI member countries in the region dealing with global climate changes and the greenhouse effect.

Announcement:

English version at :http://www.iaisummerinstitutes.iai.int/Files/SI03/GW_Announcement_English.pdf

Spanish version at:http://www.iaisummerinstitutes.iai.int/Files/SI03/GW_Announcement_Spanish.pdf

Program (English or Spanish Version)

English :http://www.iaisummerinstitutes.iai.int/Files/SI03/GW_Program_English.pdf

Spanish :http://www.iaisummerinstitutes.iai.int/Files/SI03/GW_Program_Spanish.pdf

________________________________________________

2) Research/Publications on Forest and Climate Change
________________________________________________

"Exploring Possibilities of Reforestation of Forest Lands Exposed to Encroachment and Shifting Cultivation in the North Eastern India through Clean Development Mechanism" by Promode Kant and R P S Katwal published in: Proceedings of the National Workshop on "Technological Innovations and Research Advancements for Application in Joint Forest Management" held by the FAO and the Indian Council of Forestry Research & Education (ICFRE), Dehradun, India

Abstract:

The cumulative area under shifting cultivation in the north eastern India is estimated to be 1.73 million ha and the extent of encroachment on forest lands in the Brahmputra valley alone is about 0.26 million ha. There are possibilities of reforestation over 0.6 million ha of lands under shifting cultivation and 0.1 million ha of encroached forest lands through the willing participation of the traditional and current tribal users of these lands provided the economic returns are quick, steady and substantial. Raising tree plantations in these lands for carbon sequestration can result in generating $43.5 million (about Rs 2170 millions) worth of carbon credits annually in addition to the value of forest products at the time of final harvesting. Reforestation under the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol can, therefore, be an attractive economic opportunity for the region.

To receive a copy of the article please contact:

Promode Kant IFS
Chief Conservator of Forests
Indian Council of Forestry Research & Education
Email: promodekant@yahoo.com, kantp@icfre.org

***

Journal: Forestry

Volume: 76 Issue: 3 June 2003

- Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from forest operations in Finland and Sweden Berg S., Karjalainen T. pp 271-284

Abstract:

Forest operations use inputs of external energy, which should be considered when environmental impact in the forest sector is of concern. Operations are highly mechanized in Finland and Sweden, and thus are sources of greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, efficiency has increased as a result of mechanization. Two studies of environmental loads from forest operations in Sweden and Finland are compared in this paper. There are similarities in the forest management system and technology used, but the level of mechanization in thinnings and terrain difficulty differ. Differences occur between countries in CO2, CO and NO emissions. These are attributed to variations in operations, technology, and also to quality of fuel used. Some of the differences observed between the two countries are due to the origin of basic data as well as methods used in transforming data to information relevant for environmental assessments. This experience will enable better life cycle assessments where forest operations constitute an important part of the environmental load.

***

Journal: Forestry

Volume: 76 Issue: 3 June 2003

- Carbon balance of afforested peatland in Scotland

Hargreaves K.J., Milne R., Cannell M.G.R.

pp 299-317

Abstract:

The annual net CO2 exchange over undisturbed deep peatland in Scotland was measured continuously for 22 months using eddy covariance. Annual CO2 exchanges over peatlands that had been drained, ploughed and afforested with conifers 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9 and 26 years previously were estimated by extrapolating two to four weekly measurements, using relationships between daytime fluxes and solar radiation and night-time fluxes and air temperature. The contribution of the trees to the overall net CO2 flux was estimated using a carbon accounting model, calibrated to fit conifer volume yield data. The carbon exchange of the peat and ground vegetation was then the difference between the overall carbon flux and the amount accumulated in trees and tree litter. The undisturbed peat accumulated 0.25 t C ha-1 a-1. Newly drained peatland (2¿4 years after ploughing) emitted between 2 and 4 t C ha-1 a-1, but when ground vegetation recolonized, the peatland became a sink again, absorbing 3 t C ha-1 a-1 4¿8 years after tree planting. Thereafter, the trees dominated the budget and afforested peatlands absorbed up to 5 t C ha-1 a-1. Assuming that the trees accumulated carbon at rates commensurate with yield class 10 m3 ha-1 a-1, the peat beneath the trees after canopy closure was estimated to be decomposing at only 1 t C ha-1 a-1 or less. This is slower than previously thought and suggested that afforested peatlands in Scotland accumulate more carbon in trees, litter, forest soil and products than is lost from the peat for 90¿190 years.

***

Journal: Ecological Modelling

Volume: 166 Issue: 3 August 2003

- Using a biogeochemistry model in simulating forests productivity responses to climatic change and [CO2] increase: example of Pinus halepensis in Provence (south-east France)

Cyrille Rathgeber, Antoine Nicault, Jed O. Kaplan, Joël Guiot

pp 239-255

Abstract:

Tree-ring chronologies provide long-term records of growth in natural environmental conditions and may be used to evaluate the impacts of climatic change and [CO2] increase on forest productivity. This study focuses on 21 Pinus halepensis forest stands in calcareous Provence (in the south-east France). Changes in productivity are simulated using the global biogeochemistry model BIOME3, that we have adapted to run with chronological data. Tree-ring data (width and density) were used to estimate, for each stand, an observed series of changes in productivity. Simulated and observed productivity changes are then compared to validate the chronological biogeochemistry model BIOME3C. Variations in productivity were well reconstructed at 15 sites. After this validation, BIOME3C was used to simulate forest productivity changes for a 2×CO2 scenario. The 2×CO2 climate used as input was obtained using results from Météo-France's ARPEGE atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), downscaled to local meteorological stations. Productivity increases moderately for all stands (from 17 to 24%) when climatic changes alone were taken into account. The main factor responsible for this increase is a reduction in summer drought severity. Productivity increases highly for all stands (from 72 to 86%) when the physiological fertilising effect of the [CO2] increase is considered separately. When both climatic changes and the [CO2] increase were taken into account, productivity increases highly, from 107% (for Moustier) to 141% (for La Ciotat). The direct fertilising effect of [CO2] increase has a greater influence on the forest stands productivity than the indirect climatic changes effect. These results also exhibit the importance of the synergy between the effects of climate change and [CO2] increase, as the increase in productivity resulting from the combined effects are more than the sum of the individual CO2 and climate effects. Although the detected effects of global change during the 20th century were slight, acceleration of these changes is likely to lead to great changes in the future productivity of P. halepensis forests.

***

Journal: Environment International

Volume: 29 Issue: 2-3 June 2003

- Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on forest trees and forest ecosystems: knowledge gaps

David F. Karnosky

pp 161-169

Abstract:

Atmospheric CO2 is rising rapidly, and options for slowing the CO2 rise are politically charged as they largely require reductions in industrial CO2 emissions for most developed countries. As forests cover some 43% of the Earth's surface, account for some 70% of terrestrial net primary production (NPP), and are being bartered for carbon mitigation, it is critically important that we continue to reduce the uncertainties about the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on forest tree growth, productivity, and forest ecosystem function. In this paper, I review knowledge gaps and research needs on the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on forest above- and below-ground growth and productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, water relations, wood quality, phenology, community dynamics and biodiversity, antioxidants and stress tolerance, interactions with air pollutants, heterotrophic interactions, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, I discuss research needs regarding modeling of the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on forests.

Even though there has been a tremendous amount of research done with elevated CO2 and forest trees, it remains difficult to predict future forest growth and productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2. Likewise, it is not easy to predict how forest ecosystem processes will respond to enriched CO2. The more we study the impacts of increasing CO2, the more we realize that tree and forest responses are yet largely uncertain due to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group, and the complex interactions of elevated atmospheric CO2 with soil fertility, drought, pests, and co-occurring atmospheric pollutants such as nitrogen deposition and O3. Furthermore, it is impossible to predict ecosystem-level responses based on short-term studies of young trees grown without interacting stresses and in small spaces without the element of competition. Long-term studies using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technologies or forest stands around natural CO2 vents are needed to increase the knowledge base on forest ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO2. In addition, new experimental protocols need to continue to be developed that will allow for mature trees to be examined in natural ecosystems. These studies should be closely linked to modeling efforts so that the inference capacity from these expensive and long-term studies can be maximized.

***

Journal: Global and Planetary Change

Volume: 38 Issue: 3-4 September 2003

- The possible response of life zones in China under global climate change

Xiongwen Chena, Xin-Shi Zhang, Bai-Lian Li

pp 327-337

Abstract:

The response of natural vegetation to climate change is of global concern. In this research, an aggregated Holdridge Life Zone System was used to study the possible response of life zones in China under doubled atmospheric CO2 concentration with the input climatic parameters at 0.5×0.5° resolution of longitude and latitude from NCAR regional climate model 2 (RegCM2) coupled with the CSIRO global climate model. The results indicate that the latitudinal distribution of life zones would become irregular because of the complicated climate change. In particular, new life zones, such as subtropical desert (SD), tropical desert (TDE) and tropical thorn woodland (TTW), would appear. Subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest (SEBF), tropical rainforest and monsoon forest (TRF), SD, TDE and TTW zones would appear in the northeastern China. Cool-temperate mixed coniferous and broadleaved forest (CMC) and warm-temperate deciduous broadleaved forest (WDBF) zones would appear at latitudes 25¿35°N. The temperate desert (TD) in the western China would become Tibetan high-cold plateau (THP), SEBF, WDBF and temperate steppe (TS), and a large part of THP would be replaced by TRF, TDE, SEBF, TS and TTW. The relative area (distribution area/total terrestrial area) of CMC, TRF, TDE and TTW zone would increase about 3%, 21%, 3% and 6%, respectively. However, the relative area of SEBF, TS, TD and THP would decrease about 5%, 3%, 19% and 4%, respectively. In all, the relative area of forests (CCF, CMC, WDBF, SEBF, TRF) would increase about 15%, but the relative area of desert (TD, SD, TDE, and TTW) and THP would decrease about 9% and 4%, respectively. Therefore, responses of different life zones in China to climate change would be dramatic, and nationwide corridors should be considered for the conservation of migrating species under climate change.

***

Journal: Global and Planetary Change

Article in Press, Corrected Proof

- Climate from dendrochronology: latest developments and results

Nicoletta Martinelli

Abstract:

This review deals with the latest developments in dendroclimatology focused on climate reconstruction. It presents results from research carried out during the period 1992¿2001, when both the geographical and chronological extension of tree-ring data were greatly improved. Research projects are presently being carried out in nearly all the main forest land areas of the Subarctic and Subantarctic zones, outside the traditional regions of research in North America and Europe, and about 150 tree-ring chronologies over 1000 years in length have been developed. Special attention is paid to data from Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, where a detailed temperature reconstruction has been completed back to A.D. 970.

Research carried out in Italy and France provides useful information on climate change and CO2. The aim of this research consists of evaluating whether in the radial tree growth of recent decades, there might be a part unexplained by climate and due directly to increasing atmospheric CO2 fertilisation. These studies show that many wooden species in various ecosystems show different responses of ring width to increasing atmospheric CO2. Finally, new scenarios of vegetation distribution and carbon sequestering, due both to positive or negative response from the trees, are offered by studies that reconstruct the expected radial growth of trees in situations of atmospheric CO2 doubling.

***

Journal: Journal of Environmental Management

Volume: 69 Issue: 1 September 2003

- Carbon dynamics and land-use choices: building a regional-scale multidisciplinary model

Suzi Kerr, Shuguang Liu, Alexander S. P. Pfaff, R. Flint Hughes pp 25-37

Abstract:

Policy enabling tropical forests to approach their potential contribution to global-climate-change mitigation requires forecasts of land use and carbon storage on a large scale over long periods. In this paper, we present an integrated modeling methodology that addresses these needs. We model the dynamics of the human land-use system and of C pools contained in each ecosystem, as well as their interactions. The model is national scale, and is currently applied in a preliminary way to Costa Rica using data spanning a period of over 50 years. It combines an ecological process model, parameterized using field and other data, with an economic model, estimated using historical data to ensure a close link to actual behavior. These two models are linked so that ecological conditions affect land-use choices and vice versa. The integrated model predicts land use and its consequences for C storage for policy scenarios. These predictions can be used to create baselines, reward sequestration, and estimate the value in both environmental and economic terms of including C sequestration in tropical forests as part of the efforts to mitigate global climate change. The model can also be used to assess the benefits from costly activities to increase accuracy and thus reduce errors and their societal costs

***

Journal: Journal of Hydrology

Volume: 280 Issues: 1-4 September 2003

- Influence of forest fires on climate change studies in the central boreal forest of Canada

C. Valeo, K. Beaty, R. Hesslein

pp 91-104

Abstract:

This brief paper indicates that forest fires may have short and longer term effects on runoff and thus, can influence trend studies on the response of watersheds to climate change. Twenty-two watersheds at the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario were studied to view the impacts of climatic variability and forest fires on runoff. A roughly 30 year database demonstrated few trends in climatological variables and even fewer trends in runoff data at the 5% significance level. Daily maximum temperature increased by 0.053 °C per year, while precipitation in the months of February and March showed significant decreases. Total snow showed a significant decrease over a 30 year period at the 8% significance level. The Mann Kendall test for trend was applied to the runoff indices of 19 watersheds and it was revealed that only six exhibited trends. Of these, five had been burned during the test period. Virtually all burned watersheds showed initial increases in runoff, however, long term runoff trended lower in the burned watersheds, while the one watershed that was not burned showed an increasing trend. Forest fires alter the age distribution of trees with subsequent impacts on water yields in the short and longer term.

***

Journal: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

Volume: 118 Issues: 3-4 September 2003

- Large carbon uptake by an unmanaged 250-year-old deciduous forest in Central Germany

Alexander Knohl, Ernst-Detlef Schulze, Olaf Kolle, Nina Buchmann

pp 151-167

Abstract:

Unmanaged forests at a late stage of successional development are considered to be insignificant as carbon sinks, since in theory, assimilation is thought to be balanced by respiration. However, little experimental evidence for this hypothesis exists so far for forests at the ecosystem level. Therefore, we performed continuous eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide over an unmanaged beech forest in the Hainich National Park in Central Germany as part of the EU project CARBOEUROFLUX. This forest shows typical characteristics of an `advanced' forest with large dead wood pools, a diverse stand structure and a wide tree age class distribution, up to 250 years. This forest was a large carbon sink over 2 years, with 494 g C m-2 per year in 2000 and 490 g C m-2 per year in 2001. Daytime summer fluxes were strongly controlled by photosynthetic photon flux density (R2=0.7¿0.9), with minor effects of the ratio of diffuse to total downward radiation or the vapor pressure deficit. Nighttime CO2 fluxes were mainly controlled by soil temperature (R2=0.8) and soil moisture. In addition, high nighttime CO2 fluxes (4¿6 mol m-2 s-1) were found directly before and during bud break in spring as well as just after leaf fall of both years (2000 and 2001), reflecting stand physiology corresponding to phenological changes, independent of soil temperature. Additional wind profile measurements at five heights within the canopy revealed a decoupling of above and below canopy air flow under conditions of low friction velocity (u*<0.4 m s-1), probably indicating down slope drainage. In conclusion, unmanaged forests at a comparatively late stage of successional development can still act as significant carbon sinks with large implications for forest management practice and negotiations about biological sinks within the Kyoto Protocol.

***

Journal: Forest Policy and Economics

Volume: 5 Issue: 3 September 2003

- The land-use effects of a forest carbon policy in the US

Grace Y. Wong and Janaki R. R. Alavalapati

pp 249-263

Abstract:

The inclusion of forest sinks as a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy at the climate negotiations in Marakech (November, 2001) is expected to lead to increased investments in forest establishment and management by many developed countries. Previous studies in this area have typically focused on market impacts in the forestry sector, such as changes in production, consumption, prices, and trade, as a result of sinks. Here, we consider their inter-sectoral linkages and examine the potential economy-wide impacts of a forest carbon policy for the US over the next 20 years. Specifically, we employ a dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to simulate the scenario of a global forest carbon policy with and without US participation, and analyze their impacts on national economic welfare and land use distribution among the different sectors in the US. Our findings suggest that the establishment of carbon plantations in the US will have a small and favorable impact on the overall economy and particularly, on the farm and forest sectors. Alternatively, US inaction with regards to ratifying the Kyoto Protocol is likely to have adverse consequences for the economy as a whole, particularly when taking into consideration the loss of benefits foregone.

_________________________________

3) Climate Change News

_________________________________

USE FORESTRY WASTE, CUT EMISSIONS

European countries could help meet their Kyoto emissions requirements by using forestry waste products like leftover tree stumps and foliage to produce energy.http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,60531,00.html

[from Point Carbon]

JAPAN'S NISSHO IWAI TO LAUNCH AFFORESTATION FUND

Nissho Iwai Corp. plans next year to introduce an investment fund that supports its afforestation operations in Vietnam and offers carbon dioxide emission rights to investors as dividends.http://www.co2e.com/News/story.asp?StoryID=1283

[from Point Carbon]

US ENERGY SECRETARY CREATES REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS TO DEVELOP CARBON SEQUESTRATION OPTIONS

US Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham has selected seven regional teams to help develop the framework needed to develop carbon sequestration technologies and put them into action. Part of the initiative is to establish regional baselines for CO2 sources and sinks.http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=121-09022003

[from Point Carbon]

NEW TECHNIQUE MEASURES CARBON IN SOIL

Researchers at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology have earned a patent pending on a technique that could help farmers tap into the market for carbon credits under the Kyoto Protocol.http://www.nola.com/newsflash/national/index.ssf?/base/national-0/1062508441247652.xml

[from Point Carbon]

UN AGENCY CALLS FOR TANGIBLE RESULTS IN SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF 'VITAL' FORESTS

Warning that forests are vital in mitigating climate change and combating land degradation and desertification, the head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has called for tangible results in sustainable management of this precious resource.http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=8321&Cr=forest&Cr1=

[UN News Centre]

FOREST FIRES BURN THEIR WAY INTO CLIMATE CHANGE

New evidence suggests wildfires are a wild card in climate change. The chemical junk that forest fires spew into the air might affect atmospheric chemistry in a manner similar to - and on a scale similar to - the impact of sulfurous chemicals from volcanic eruptions. This further complicates the complex challenge scientists face in trying to understand what's happening to Earth's climate.http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0731/p12s01-sten.html

OLD TREES POOR CARBON SPONGE?

Carbon stockpiles question idea that forests will counteract global warming.

Mature trees might not offset global warming by mopping up excess carbon dioxide, suggests a forest study in Switzerland. They may already have all the carbon dioxide that they need.http://www.nature.com/nsu/030721/030721-6.html

_________________________________

4) New Publications:

_________________________________

GREENHOUSE ECONOMICS: VALUE AND ETHICS

By Clive Spash, Routledge, London, New York, 2002. 298 pp.; ISBN 0-415-12718-1

Global climate change, along with the related issue of worldwide biodiversity loss, is the major environmental concern of the 21st century. Clive Spash's book not only presents a scientifically rigorous and balanced account of the enhanced greenhouse effect as a physical phenomenon, it is also the best exposition to date on the political economy of climate policy. The standard welfare economic approach to climate change is fairly presented and its irrelevance as a policy guide is clearly shown. In Greenhouse Economics, climate change modeling and policy is examined using contemporary economic theory as well as insights from disciplines as diverse as environmental ethics and probability theory. The book is well-organized with helpful aids such as a list of acronyms at the front and a glossary at the back. [Book review in Ecological Economics, Volume 46, Issue 2, September 2003, Pages 307-308 by John Gowdy]

DEAD HEAT: GLOBAL JUSTICE AND GLOBAL WARMING

By Tom Athanasiou, Paul Baer, Seven Stories Press, New York, NY, 2002. 173 pp.; ISBN 1-58322-477-7

This short book provides a compelling, urgent and unabashedly blunt argument for a climate protection treaty on the scale of a global Marshall Plan. The authors postulate that an equal emissions rights based climate regime will be the lynchpin to a series of battles over global common property resources. While their main proposal¿¿that an equal human right to emit greenhouse gases is the only fair and effective basis for cutting emissions in the long run¿¿has been around for over a decade, it has rarely been argued so forcefully. [Book review in Ecological Economics, Volume 46, Issue 2, September 2003, Pages 308-309 by Barry D. Solomon]

GLOBAL WARMING AND EAST ASIA: THE DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Edited by Paul G. Harris, Publisher: Routledge Curzon; 288 pages

Global Warming and East Asia examines the domestic politics, foreign policy and international relations of climate change in China, Japan and Southeast Asia. The countries of East Asia are often disproportionately affected by climate change and as they expand and develop, their contribution to the problem grows. This book addresses the forces and actors underlying their policies and behaviour, in so doing increasing our understanding of a region vital to mitigating and coping with climate change.

_________________________________

5) Web sites of interest:

_________________________________

IISD DAILY REPORTS FROM THE XII WORLD FORESTRY CONGRESS.

Some of the material focuses on carbon sequestration.http://www.iisd.ca/linkages/sd/wfc12/

NEW POINT CARBON CONFERENCE WEB SITE

Point Carbon has launched a new web site showing upcoming carbon market related conferences.

For further details see:http://www.pointcarbon.com/category.php?categoryID=78

POLEX: CIFOR's Forest Policy Expert Listserver

The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) established the (CIFOR-POLEX) electronic listserver in July 1997 as a free information service to the global forest community. Previous CIFOR POLEX messages can be found at the CIFOR website:http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/

UNFCCC SECRETARIAT: CLIMATE HEADLINES

Climate headlines, the secretariat's news monitoring service has been expanded in scope and has a new look. This internet-based news service highlights the latest news and information related to the climate change convention, its negotiating process and the Kyoto Protocol. The service surveys the internet for breaking news from international news agencies and leading newspapers around the world. It provides convenient access to the stories.http://maindb.unfccc.int/media/headlines/

_________________________________

6) Climate Change Jobs

_________________________________

DEADLINE EXTENDED

IGES Project: ¿Integrated Capacity Strengthening for the Clean Development Mechanism¿

Unit Manager and Country Officer sought

The Climate Policy project (CP) of the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Located in Hayama, Kanagawa, Japan, is implementing a sub-project entitled "Integrated Capacity Strengthening for the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)" sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Environment. The goal of this project is to develop human and institutional capacity in developing countries for effectively utilizing CDM as a tool to achieve sustainable development in respective countries while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas emission worldwide. To implement this project, the CP is looking for several country officers.

Further details on the post and how to apply can be found in the Recruitment Announcement on the IGES webpage.http://www.iges.or.jp/en/from/recruit/recruit.html

CAN INTERNATIONAL SECRETARIAT COORDINATOR

To set up a new International CAN Secretariat in Bonn, Germany, the CAN International Board is creating a new full- time position. Overall purpose of the job: Provide effective, efficient and confidential secretarial administrative support to the CAN A full job description is available at the web:www.climatenetwork.orgDeadline for applications: October 15th

CENTER FOR CLEAN AIR POLICY

Manager/Senior Policy Analyst, International Climate Change Team

The Center for Clean Air Policy, a non-profit environmental think tank in Washington, DC, is recruiting a Manager/Senior Policy Analyst to manage its international climate change team. Key responsibilities include managing CCAP¿s Future Actions Dialogue which brings together key negotiators from 30 developed and developing countries; conducting original technical and policy analyses on international climate issues; supervising project team staff and consultants doing capacity building projects in developing and Central/Eastern European countries; fundraising and developing proposals; representing CCAP at international conferences; and strategic planning for the international agenda of the organization

Interested candidates should send a resume and writing sample to:

Attention: Matt Kittell
E-mail: mkittell@ccap.org
Fax: +1-202-408-8896

**** for all FAO Vacancies visit:http://www.fao.org/VA/Employ.htm****

_________________________________

7) Readers Communication / Saying Hello

_________________________________

Our reader Lemmy N. Namayanga did some research on the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestered in aboveground woody biomass from remotely sensed data. He wrote: ¿I just want to draw your attention to my small MSc level research that I did in Serowe-Botswana. Please visithttp://www.itc.nl/library/Papers/msc_2002/nrm/nenge_namayanga.pdf for my full thesis.¿

To contact Lemmy N. Namayanga directly write to:

lnamayanga@yahoo.com

***

Dr. K. M. Bhat from the Kerala Forest Research Institute wrote the following: ¿Dear colleagues (¿)I am seeking sponsorship/financial support for a project based in southern India on the theme: Impact of climate change on growth dynamics and productivity of tropical trees as evidenced from dendroecological/tree ring studies. I would appreciate in hearing from anybody who is interested in supporting such a programme or establishing a partnership research programme.¿

Here are the contact details of Mr. Bhat:

Head, Wood Science Division
Kerala Forest Research Institute
P.O. Peechi 680 653
Thrissur Dist; Kerala State
India
Tel: +91-(0)487-2699037, 2699061-64
Fax: +91-(0)487-2699249
Email: kmbhat@kfri.org

URL:http://www.kfri.orghttp://ernakulam.sancharnet.in/trc_maksbhat/kmbhat.htm

_________________________________

Thank you for your inputs for this issue:
Dr. K. M. Bhat, Promode Kant, Lemmy N. Namayanga, Kolja Zimmermann

_________________________________

The objective of CLIM-FO-L is to be a forum for sharing current information and experiences about climate change and forestry amongst experts and non-experts. CLIM-FO-L will send periodically to subscribers synopsis of contributions, indicating how to obtain more detailed information on the topic. CLIM-FO-L is a service provided by the FAO Forest Products Division (FOP).

********************************************

QUICK TIPS AND INFORMATION FOR CLIM-FO-L

********************************************

- To join the list, please send an e-mail to mailserv@mailserv.fao.org containing the message (leave the subject line blank) SUBSCRIBE CLIM-FO-L

- Once on the list, to make a contribution, please contact the following address:

CLIM-FO-L@mailserv.fao.org

- To retrieve past postings, send an e-mail to mailserv@mailserv.fao.org containing the message (in lower case): get listlog/clim-fo-l.mmmyyyy (For example, "get listlog/clim-fo-l.feb2001" will retrieve postings of February 2001)

- For technical help or questions contact CLIM-FO-L@mailserv.fao.org

- To unsubscribe, please send an e-mail to mailserv@mailserv.fao.org  leaving the subject line blank and containing the following message: UNSUBSCRIBE CLIM-FO-L

- Your information is secure - We will never sell, give or distribute your address or subscription information to any third party.

Thank you for joining, and we look forward to your active participation.

CLIM-FO-L List Owner

CLIM-FO-L List Owner

last updated:  Thursday, March 25, 2004