Urban and peri-urban forestry (UPF)

Urban and peri-urban forestry (UPF) is the practice of managing forests, groups of trees and individual trees in and around urban areas in order to maximize their economic, livelihood, social, cultural, environmental and biodiversity values. UPF can serve a range of purposes and thus takes many forms, covering natural and planted forests and trees, forests maintained in watersheds or in drylands, forests and wooded areas, green spaces and street trees, as well as trees in urban/peri-urban gardens.

“For the first time, more than half the world's population live in cities and towns. By extension, urban and peri-urban forestry is becoming the window through which people make judgements about all the worlds’ trees and forests. We must ensure that cities, trees and forests grow together to meet the needs of urbanized societies and to convey the importance of all forests to life on our planet”.
– Eduardo Rojas-Briales, Assistant Director-General and Head of the Forestry Department, FAO, Rome, November 2010

Sydney, Australia. ©FAO/Fabio Salbitano

News

After an interim period following the tragic loss of our colleague Michelle Gauthier in early 2013, a new team is now taking care of FAO’s urban and periurban forestry programme.  

Simone Borelli was appointed Agroforestry and Urban/Periurban Forestry Officer on 1 June 2014. Simone holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Public Management from the University of London, a Masters’ Degree in Watershed Management from the University of Arizona, USA and a Bachelor’s Degree in Forest Sciences from the University of Tuscia, Italy. He has worked for FAO in different capacities for over 15 years and has a wide perspective on forestry matters. He also worked for IPGRI and WWF.

Yujuan Chen joined the programme as Junior Professional Officer for Urban/Periurban Forestry and Trees Outside Forests on 14 July 2014. Yujuan obtained her Ph.D. in urban forestry from Virginia Tech (USA), earned her Master’s degree in urban forestry from the Urban Forestry Research Center of the Chinese Academy of Forestry and completed her Bachelor’s degree in horticulture at the Landscape Architecture Department of the Beijing Forestry University. Prior to joining FAO, she was a forestry specialist with New Jersey State Forestry Services in the U.S.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank Michela Conigliaro who provided an essential contribution to the continuation of activities during this interim period.

 

 

last updated:  Thursday, August 21, 2014