Human-wildlife conflict

News

20 April 2015 In February 2015, IUCN CEESP/SSC Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group (SULi), the International Institute for Environment and Development, the Austrian Ministry of Environment, the ARC Centre of Environment and Decisions at the University of Queensland, and TRAFFIC convened an international symposium in Muldersdrift in South Africa to explore whether and under what circumstances community-based interventions are likely to achieve success in combating current patterns of illegal use and trade of wildlife. The symposium was kindly supported by GIZ, USAID, and the Austrian Ministry of the Environment. Case studies of frontline experiences across Africa, Latin America and Asia from communities on the sharp end of the illegal wildlife trade chain were shared, as well as innovative research from around the world on a diverse range of subjects from the economics of the illegal wildlife trade, to using criminology theory to understand what drivers trigger wildlife crime. The meeting issued a set of recommendations on engaging communities in combating the illegal wildlife trade (IWT) at the source. The meeting report, including key conclusions and recommendations, is now available. [more]
Wildlife partnership launches bushmeat sourcebook 3 March 2015 The Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management today launched the Bushmeat Sourcebook, an online resource, on the occasion of the second World Wildlife Day. The sourcebook examines bushmeat’s vital contribution to food security, local livelihoods, and other aspects of human well-being in many parts of the world. It also shows, however, how unsustainable harvesting can affect the ecological stability of forest ecosystems, as well as human health. "The sourcebook represents a valuable awareness-raising tool, which will help bring attention to key facts," said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, Chair of the CPW and Executive Secretary of the CBD. "It also shows us how indigenous peoples and local communities can play a positive role in helping to sustainably manage our valuable wildlife resources. [more]

According to the 2003 IUCN World Parks Congress, human-wildlife conflict occurs when wildlife requirements encroach on those of human populations, with costs both to residents and wild animals (IUCN, 2005). Human-wildlife conflict has existed for as long as humans and wild animals have shared the same landscapes and resources. Human-wildlife conflict does not occur only in Africa. Nowadays human-wildlife conflict exists in one form or another all over the world. Conflict between humans and crocodiles, for example, has been reported from 33 countries spanning the tropics and subtropics, and the problem probably exists in many more. While all continents and countries, whether developed or not, are affected by human-wildlife conflict, agropastoralists in developing countries are altogether more vulnerable than the people of developed nations. 

Together with CIRAD, WWF, CAMPFIRE and other partners, FAO has produced a human-wildlife conflict toolkit. Currently being tested in southern Africa, the toolkit provides effective measures to help resolve, prevent and mitigate the growing problem of conflict between humans and wild animals. It is designed not only to help protect people, their livestock and crops from animals but, just as important, to safeguard animals from people. It includes policies, strategies and practical tips to make increasingly close cohabitation safer for everyone. As a general strategy, the toolkit emphasizes conflict prevention through advance land-use planning. Crops, for example, should be planted where they are less accessible to problem animals, with wildlife corridors allowing animals to move to and from water sources, and hard contact with riverine and hill-edge vegetation should be avoided as much as possible. 

 

last updated:  Friday, March 7, 2014