Tamaño del texto:

Contáctenos:

Tema: Seguridad alimentaria familiar

Download resource

Food Prices and Food Security in Trinidad and Tobago

Christian Romer Løvendal, Kristian Thor Jakobsen and Andrew Jacque, FAO/ESA, 2007 The economy of Trinidad and Tobago is booming, in particular as a consequence of increased energy production and the historical high oil prices. Whilst general inflation has remained relatively low for much of the present economic boom, substantial increases in retail food prices have been observed, in particular since 2005. This paper looks at the development of retail food prices, its causes, the potential impact thereof in terms of food security and possible policy options for addressing this. It concludes that whilst households with low income are the groups most affected by the food price increases and will continue to be so in the wake of increasing international prices, it is unlikely that the price increases in isolation will throw off Trinidad and Tobago’s path towards meeting the MDG 1 hunger target and bringing the share of undernourished people down to 6.5% by 2015. However, food security problems will remain, in particular related to overweight and obesity caused by unbalanced diets.

Download resource

Analysis of Household Food Security in Dodoma Municipality: Planned and Unplanned Settlements Comparison

This paper analyses food security status in planned and unplanned settlements using Dodoma municipality in Tanzania as case study. Data for the study were collected from a total of 97 households through interviews using structured questionnaire. Both purposive and simple random sampling procedures were used as criteria for sample selection. Ordinary Least Regression Model was used to ascertain social and economic factors significantly influencing food security among households living in planned and unplanned settlements. Estimation was carried out using LIMDEP soft ware. The findings of the study revealed that households living in unplanned settlement are food insecure compared to their counterparts living in planned settlements. The authors concludes that this were partly due to the fact that food availability, food accessibility and nutritional aspects were relatively better in planned settlement than their counterparts in unplanned settlement; and that the situation was partly due to low purchasing power, lack of employment and lack of credits. They finally recommend that there should be improvement of purchasing power; provision of credits; provision of food assistance to vulnerable households; and promotion of diversification of economic activities.

Download resource

Food Security in Southern Africa-Assessing the use of ENSO information

By Glantz, Betsill and Crandall, Environmental and Societal Impacts Group (ESIG). Information about El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events potentially has much to offer in alleviating the impact of drought and improving food security in drought-prone countries. Advanced warning of ENSO and "teleconnected" drought could allow for flexible agricultural production practices, strategic management of grain and water reserves, minimal budgetary impacts, and effective management of donor relief. This study reviews the actual as well as potential use of ENSO information during the 1991-92 drought in Southern Africa. Using the case-scenario method, this study assesses the use of ENSO information during the drought situation and then considers how the national, regional and international responses to the drought might have been different had ENSO information been widely available to decision makers in March 1991. A set of possible responses is identified based on information obtained from open-ended questionnaires and interviews that, in theory, could have been taken with earlier information. Political, social, and economic constraints to the actual use of this information are also identified, which enables us to distinguish between the theoretical and actual value of ENSO information in this particular drought situation. In the final chapter, we note that many lessons were learned from the 1991/92 drought in Southern Africa which have enhanced the potential utility of ENSO information for food security in the region. Nevertheless, potential users still face obstacles in their ability to use ENSO information in decision making. These include questions about the reliability of forecasts, delays in the timing of forecasts, a lack of understanding of what the forecasts mean, as well as concerns about the utility of regional-scale forecasts for local level decision making.