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Tema: Derecho a la Alimentación

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The Fome Zero (Zero Hunger) Program: The Brazilian experience

By: José Graziano da Silva; Mauro Eduardo Del Grossi; Caio Galvão de França.

The launching of the “Zero Hunger Project – a proposal for a food security policy for Brazil” in October 2001 by the then candidate for the presidency Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva reflected the maturing of discussions and proposals on food security and fighting hunger, which became national priorities to be addressed through planned and decisive actions of the State with social participation. With the electoral victory of President Lula in 2003, the Zero Hunger project became the main governmental strategy guiding economic and social policies in Brazil and marked the beginning of an inflection that left behind an old dichotomy between them. Actions began to be taken to integrate structural policies into emergency policies to fight hunger and poverty. New, differentiated policies for family farming were implemented and basic legislation was built for the national food and nutrition security policy. This book is part of the NEAD Debate Series (Série NEAD Debate) and it presents some fundamental texts for one to understand the Brazilian experience with the Zero Hunger Program at different moments of its implementation over an eight-year period as a Government Program, bringing together reflections on different aspects of the process, such as the mobilization of different segments of society around it, the role of family farming, advances and challenges, among others.

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The Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition: A Right to Food Perspective

The vision of the reformed Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is to strive towards “... a world free from hunger where countries implement the voluntary guidelines for the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security”.1 As an important tool to achieve this vision, the Global Strategic Framework (GSF) will offer a set of guidelines for States, intergovernmental actors, the corporate private sector, and the CFS itself, on how to promote policy coherence within the rights based framework, towards the full realization of the right to adequate food.

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The Right to Food and Access to Natural Resources

In the rural areas of many developing countries, natural resources are an important source of food, both through direct consumption and through providing the basis for incomegenerating activities (e.g. cash crops, forest products) that enable people to purchase food. Because of this, measures to improve access to resources are an important element of strategies for the progressive realization of the right to food. Yet, for a long time, human rights and resource-access literatures and practitioners operated in a compartmentalized way. Human rights arguments were the reserved domain of lawyers and human rights campaigners, and prioritized civil and political rights like freedom from torture or freedom of expression. Resource-access issues were traditionally tackled through diverse combinations of technical interventions and political mobilization — more rarely through human rights arguments.

05.06.2012
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Africa Human Development Report 2012

The 2012 Human Development Report for Africa explores why dehumanizing hunger remains pervasive in the region, despite abundant agricultural resources, a favorable growing climate, and rapid economic growth rates. It also emphasizes that food security – the ability to consistently acquire enough calories and nutrients for a healthy and productive life - is essential for human development. 

To boost food security, it argues for action in four interrelated areas: agricultural productivity, nutrition, access to food, and empowerment of the rural poor. It asserts that increasing agricultural productivity in sustainable ways can bolster food production and economic opportunities, thereby improving food availability and increasing purchasing power. Effective nutrition policies can create conditions for the proper use and absorption of calories and nutrients. Finally, empowering the rural poor - especially women - and harnessing the power of information, innovation, and markets can promote equitable allocation of food and resources within families and across communities.