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Making Small Scale Farming Work in Sub-Saharan Africa

Small scale farmers are among the poorest and the hungriest in the world and yet small scale farming is supposed to pave the way to ending poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. It even appears as if efforts by governments and the development community at large to support small scale farming in sub-Saharan Africa are not yielding significant results. Poverty is deepening and the number of the hungry is going up not down. In the light of the global recommitments to agriculture, calls are being made wherever possible to invest in small scale agriculture but different results cannot be expected if the same strategiesare used.
This article reiterates and proposes some ideas to make agriculture work for development in sub-Saharan Africa. New strategies and investments in small scale farming must take cognizance of some key facts, that market access is key to small scale food production systems as such efforts to increase agricultural productivity can only be effective if they are linked to an appreciation of market potential. As much as small farmers require assistance to be able to produce more food, they equally require assistance to be able to sell Africa’s food and this requires serious reconsideration of post-production systems in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, that there is a need for strategies that will seek to end the way interventions in the agricultural sector are de-linked from each other and promote an integrated approach of supporting the full continuum of production, processing and marketing of food.

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Gender in agriculture sourcebook

With contributions from more than 100 specialists in gender, agriculture and rural development. Combines descriptive accounts of national and international experiences in agricultural investment with practical guidance on designing strategies that capitalize on gender equality and women's empowerment.

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Familiy Nutrition Guide

This guide is for everyone who wants to improve the feeding and nutrition of families in developing countries. It is for you if you are a health worker, nutritionist, agricultural extension worker or any other kind of development worker. It is for you if you are a member of a community group or a mother or other caregiver who wants to know more about family feeding. It might also be useful to anyone training health staff and community workers.
If you do not have a basic knowledge of nutrition and feel uncomfortable dealing with some technical parts of the guide, we suggest that you team up with local professionals so they can give you help when you need it. The purpose of the guide is to: provide the information needed to prepare good, nutritious and safe meals and feed each member of the family well; motivate people to adopt healthy eating habits.
The guide is divided into 11 topics that cover basic nutrition, family food security, meal planning, food hygiene and the special feeding needs of children, women and men, and of old, sick and malnourished people. Each Topic is set out in the same way and has two parts: Nutrition notes and Sharing this information. The Nutrition notes summarizes up-to-date knowledge on each topic. These can be used to prepare: face-to-face education sessions with families and other community-level groups (including teachers, care workers, traditional health workers, etc.); nutrition education print materials (such as booklets, brochures, flyers, posters) or material for other media (such as radio talks); training materials for different levels of staff in different sectors who deal with family nutrition.

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Legal aspects of Livestock Keepers’ Rights

Report of a workshop held in Kalk Bay, South Africa, December 2008.

05.06.2012

Thèmes:

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The urban producer's resource book

A practical guide by FAO's "Food for the Cities" Project for working with Low Income Urban and Peri-Urban Producers Organizations. These guidelines set out the main problems and issues related to low income Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture (UPA). Suggestions are provided for each issue to show how UPA producers can work together and with other stakeholders for the benefit of all.
Improving the capabilities of producer groups and organizations can lead to higher incomes for producers, safer food production for the cities and an increased overall contribution of UPA to a better city environment.

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The Right to Food and Access to Natural Resources

In the rural areas of many developing countries, natural resources are an important source of food, both through direct consumption and through providing the basis for incomegenerating activities (e.g. cash crops, forest products) that enable people to purchase food. Because of this, measures to improve access to resources are an important element of strategies for the progressive realization of the right to food. Yet, for a long time, human rights and resource-access literatures and practitioners operated in a compartmentalized way. Human rights arguments were the reserved domain of lawyers and human rights campaigners, and prioritized civil and political rights like freedom from torture or freedom of expression. Resource-access issues were traditionally tackled through diverse combinations of technical interventions and political mobilization — more rarely through human rights arguments.

05.06.2012
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Making the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy coherent with development goals

ODI Briefing Paper
The EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) aims to promote agriculture throughout the EU by increasing farmers’ incomes and supporting the provision of public goods such as the environment. It is funded from the European Commission (EC) budget and accounts for roughly 40% of total EC expenditure. It is divided into two pillars. Pillar 1 includes both direct payments to farmers and market management measures. Pillar 2 focuses on improving the structural and environmental performance of agriculture and on promoting local/rural development. Pillar 2 requires Member State co-financing.
The EU has recognised that making development policy in isolation is not sufficient. Its commitment to Policy Coherence for Development seeks to ensure that all policies, not only development assistance, promote growth in developing countries. Any decision on CAP reform options must, therefore, be analysed against development goals.

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Legal aspects of Livestock Keepers’ Rights

Report of a workshop held in Kalk Bay, South Africa, December 2008.

31.05.2012

Thèmes:

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UN High-Level Task Force on Global Food Security - "Food and Nutrition Security: Comprehensive Framework for Action"

The United Nations System High Level Task Force on Global Food Security released a summary version of its Updated Comprehensive Framework for Action (UCFA). The UCFA is the UN system-wide coordinated approach for supporting country and regional actions that lead to sustainable and resilient rural livelihoods and food and nutrition security for all. The summary version of the UCFA has been prepared as an easy-to-read concise document that highlights the concepts supporting the approach and presents its ten key principles for action. For further information on the work of the High Level Task Force and its Updated Comprehensive Framework for Action, please visit the website http://www.un-foodsecurity.org/

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Climate‐responsive Social Protection

In the years ahead, development efforts aiming at reducing vulnerability will increasingly have to factor in climate change, and social protection is no exception. This paper sets out the case for climate‐responsive social protection and proposes a framework with principles, design features, and functions that would help SP systems evolve in a climate‐responsive direction. The principles comprise climate‐aware planning; livelihood‐based pproaches that consider the full range of assets and institutions available to households and ommunities; and aiming for resilient ommunities by planning for the long term. Four design features that can help achieve this are: scalable and flexible programs that can ncrease coverage in response to climate isasters; climate‐responsive targeting systems; investments in livelihoods that build community and household resilience; and promotion of better climate risk management.