Thème: Études de cas nationaux

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Agricultural Extension Services at Crossroads: present dilemma and possible solutions for future in Uganda

Agricultural extension in Uganda has undergone a number of transformations from regulatory 1920-
1956, advisory 1956-1963, advisory Education 1964-1971, dormancy 1972-1981, recovery 1982-
1999, Educational 1992-1996, participatory education 1997-1998, Decentralized Education 1997-
2001 and now Agricultural services under contract extension systems. Each of those up to 1997-
2001 had strengths to build on and weaknesses to change or improve, but had challenges of the
socio-economic and political environment. In addition there have been marked changes in the
concept of agriculture, which is increasingly seen in terms of commercial or farming for market with
emphasis on modernization of agriculture and use of participatory approaches in the process.
The dilemma is that the majority of the Ugandan farming community is predominately
peasantry/subsistence with a small fraction that can be regarded emergent farmers. Such
population may not respond sustainably to the now farmer owned contract extension system
including changing patterns of donors.
The paper examines a range of issues including training needs, identification of theses needs for
more relevant and responsive curricula, the key role of service provider’s development in creating
learning organizations, developing a strategy for linkages/ learning webs or net works and for more
sustainable donor interventions.

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Food loss reduction in The Gambia

A Food and Agriculture Organization project is working to reduce food losses in the Republic of the Gambia, where two years of crop failures and soaring food prices have left more than half the country's population without enough food. In a world where in 1 in 7 people go hungry, roughly one third of global food production gets lost or wasted. But FAO and partners are working together on the Save Food Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction. Because if we are to eradicate hunger, everybody involved in food supply chains -- from producers to consumers -- must change management practices, technologies and behavior.

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Indonesia’s Modern Food Retail Sector: Interaction With Changing Food Consumption and Trade Patterns

Indonesia’s food market has changed in response to a changing and growing economy. The report examines changes in the food consumption pattern and measures the growth of modern food retail chains, packaged food purchases, and food imports in the world’s fourth-most-populous country. The evidence suggests that Indonesians are moving toward modern global purchasing and consumption patterns, but more slowly than in some comparable countries. Barriers to foreign and domestic commerce, affecting the development of modern food retail supply chains, are important constraints on food market change in Indonesia. Further change in Indonesia’s retail food sector will help determine future growth in imports, including from the United States.

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Policy for the small scale Fisheries Sector in South Africa

This policy aims to provide redress and recognition to the rights of Small Scale fisher communities in South Africa previously marginalised and discriminated against in terms of racially exclusionary laws and policies, individualised permit-based systems of resource allocation and insensitive impositions of conservation-driven regulation. In line with the broader agenda of the transformation of the fishing sector, this policy provides the framewor for the promotion of the rights of these fishers in order to fulfil the constitutional promise of substantive equality. Indeed, in terms of our Constitution, the State is committed to respecting, protecting, promoting and fulfilling the rights of Small Scale fishers in South Africa.
In so doing, this policy discharges the State’s obligation in terms of Article 1 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights to ‘adopt legislative and other measures’ to give effect to the rights enshrined in the Charter. In particular, this policy gives effect to the protection of peoples’ rights to “pursue their economic and social development according to the policy they have freely chosen” and to “freely dispose of their wealth and natural resources”.