Police:

Contactez-nous:

Topic: Measurement / Assessment

Download resource

What do we really know about the number and distribution of farms and family farms in the world?

The agricultural economics literature provides various estimates of the number of farms and small  farms in the world. This paper is an effort to provide a more complete and up to date as well as  carefully documented estimate of the total number of farms in the world, as well as by region and  level of income.

It uses data from numerous rounds of the World Census of Agriculture, the only  dataset available which allows the user to gain a complete picture of the total number of farms  globally and at the country level. The paper provides estimates of the number of family farms, the  number of farms by size as well as the distribution of farmland by farm size.

These estimates find that:  there are at least 570 million farms worldwide, of which more than 500 million can be considered  family farms. Most of the world’s farms are very small, with more than 475 million farms being less  than 2 hectares in size. Although the vast majority of the world’s farms are smaller than 2 hectares,  they operate only a small share of the world’s farmland. Farmland distribution would seem quite  unequal at the global level, but it is less so in low- and lower-middle-income countries as well as in  some regional groups.

These estimates have serious limitations and the collection of more up-to-date  agricultural census data, including data on farmland distribution is essential to our having a more representative picture of the number of farms, the number of family farms and farm size as well as farmland distribution worldwide. 

Download resource

Resilience Measurement Principles – Toward an Agenda for Measurement Design FSIN Technical Series No.1

The Food Security Information Network (FSIN)* supports the development and harmonization of methods and tools for food and nutrition security analysis. A technical working group composed of renowned experts was constituted to lead the development of a common analytical framework and technical guidelines for resilience measurement.

This paper is an initial step toward the development of resilience measurement design for use by stakeholders (e.g. programme staff, monitoring and evaluation, policy makers). It outlines:

  • A definition of resilience
  • A series of measurement design principles
  • General technical guidelines for Resilience Measurement commonly used to promote rigor in all measurement approaches
  • A set of substantive issues and analytical concerns

Url to the publication:  http://www.fsincop.net/resource-centre/detail/en/c/213177/

Download resource

Monitoring and analysing food and agricultural policies in Africa Synthesis report 2013

MAFAP’s Synthesis Report presents key findings from an unprecedented effort to systematically monitor and analyse the effects of food and agricultural policies in ten developing countries across Africa: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda.

Key findings from the report include the following and much more:

  • The policy environment and performance of domestic markets depressed producer prices by an average of ten percent between 2005 and 2010, though price disincentives are declining.
  • Most governments adopted market and trade policies to protect consumers and keep food prices down in the reference period, whilst budgetary transfers were mainly used to support producers.
  • Producer prices would improve significantly if market distortions from inefficiencies in domestic value chains were eliminated through better targeted policies and public spending. These inefficiencies, however, seem to be increasing in all ten countries surveyed.

Download resource

Post-green revolution food systems and the triple burden of malnutrition

Developing country food systems have changed dramatically since the Green Revolution period. At the same time, malnutrition still represents a challenge and is now understood to encompass the three simultaneous dimensions of undernourishment, micronutrient deficiencies, and over-nutrition manifest in overweight and obesity. These changes in food systems and in the understanding of the global malnutrition challenge necessitate fresh thinking about food systems-based strategies to reduce malnutrition. This paper introduces a special section that offers such new perspectives. We discuss trends with respect to indicators of the triple burden of malnutrition to understand the extent of global malnutrition challenges and then relate those to food systems transformation in developing countries.

Authors:

  • Miguel I. Gómez a,
  • Christopher B. Barrett a, b,
  • Terri Raney c,
  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen a, d,
  • Janice Meerman e,
  • André Croppenstedt c,
  • Brian Carisma c,
  • Brian Thompson e

a Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

b Department of Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

c Agricultural Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy

d Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

e Nutrition and Consumer Protection Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy