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Topic: Measurement / Assessment

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Resilience Measurement Principles – Toward an Agenda for Measurement Design FSIN Technical Series No.1

The Food Security Information Network (FSIN)* supports the development and harmonization of methods and tools for food and nutrition security analysis. A technical working group composed of renowned experts was constituted to lead the development of a common analytical framework and technical guidelines for resilience measurement.

This paper is an initial step toward the development of resilience measurement design for use by stakeholders (e.g. programme staff, monitoring and evaluation, policy makers). It outlines:

  • A definition of resilience
  • A series of measurement design principles
  • General technical guidelines for Resilience Measurement commonly used to promote rigor in all measurement approaches
  • A set of substantive issues and analytical concerns

Url to the publication:  http://www.fsincop.net/resource-centre/detail/en/c/213177/

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Monitoring and analysing food and agricultural policies in Africa Synthesis report 2013

MAFAP’s Synthesis Report presents key findings from an unprecedented effort to systematically monitor and analyse the effects of food and agricultural policies in ten developing countries across Africa: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda.

Key findings from the report include the following and much more:

  • The policy environment and performance of domestic markets depressed producer prices by an average of ten percent between 2005 and 2010, though price disincentives are declining.
  • Most governments adopted market and trade policies to protect consumers and keep food prices down in the reference period, whilst budgetary transfers were mainly used to support producers.
  • Producer prices would improve significantly if market distortions from inefficiencies in domestic value chains were eliminated through better targeted policies and public spending. These inefficiencies, however, seem to be increasing in all ten countries surveyed.

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Post-green revolution food systems and the triple burden of malnutrition

Developing country food systems have changed dramatically since the Green Revolution period. At the same time, malnutrition still represents a challenge and is now understood to encompass the three simultaneous dimensions of undernourishment, micronutrient deficiencies, and over-nutrition manifest in overweight and obesity. These changes in food systems and in the understanding of the global malnutrition challenge necessitate fresh thinking about food systems-based strategies to reduce malnutrition. This paper introduces a special section that offers such new perspectives. We discuss trends with respect to indicators of the triple burden of malnutrition to understand the extent of global malnutrition challenges and then relate those to food systems transformation in developing countries.

Authors:

  • Miguel I. Gómez a,
  • Christopher B. Barrett a, b,
  • Terri Raney c,
  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen a, d,
  • Janice Meerman e,
  • André Croppenstedt c,
  • Brian Carisma c,
  • Brian Thompson e

a Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

b Department of Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

c Agricultural Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy

d Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA

e Nutrition and Consumer Protection Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy

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Carbon Incentive for Physical activity: Conceptualizing clean development mechanism for food energy

The basic fact is that intense practitioners of yoga consume food only once a day while moderate practitioners of yoga consume food twice a day. With the normal consumption being around three times on a given day, the economic benefit or the reduction in food consumption due to yoga practice is two meals per person per day for intense practitioner and the same would be one meal per person per day for moderate practitioner. In addition, the economic benefit includes increase in wellbeing & consciousness, and decrease in cost of non-communicable diseases.
 
The paper analyses the food and water consumption, excessive consumption, food consumption taxes like fat tax and brings out the business behaviour of tickling food consumption. In addition to taxing and regulating the excessive consumption & the tickling behaviour, it explores the preventive best practices that reinforce natural human ability of self-control over food consumption. It identifies the practices where there is purposeful or consequential reduction in food consumption i.e. weight loss treatment and yoga, proposes clean practice, suggests accounting for savings & carbon incentive, and discusses the finance and policy options in developed and developing countries. Yoga also meets some of the objectives of health, education, environment, culture & sports, food and finance, and therefore seeks finance allocation from corresponding ministries to support the carbon incentive work. As an alternative, the human capability developed can be measured under capability approach for creation of human development incentive. With the efforts to increase physical activity by subsidy proving to be less effective and with the taxes preventing consumption but not reducing temptation in short run, the paper considers embedding the best practice in the education to bring the habit of physical activity. Evaluating the practice for optimizing food consumption may operationalize a wellbeing practice, stimulate economic growth, and may lead to completeness in conserving all forms of energy and to completeness in charging of food consumption taxes