WFP-FAO co-led Post 2015 Global Thematic Consultation on Hunger, Food Security and Nutrition

19-11-2012 - 10-01-2013

The discussion is now closed.

See below the contributions received or download the proceedings.
Summary of key themes emerged from the discussion is available here

This is YOUR OPPORTUNITY to contribute to this global debate.

As the target date for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) approaches, a number of processes have been put in place to seek inputs from country, regional and global levels, into the “Post-2015 Development Agenda and Framework”.  For more background information click here.

This is your opportunity to help identify the actions, goals, targets and indicators needed to achieve food and nutrition security, and the eradication of hunger, in a post-2015 world.  Many food security and nutrition policies, strategies and action plans have been written over the past number of  years.  Challenges and opportunities towards achieving food and nutrition security in a sustainable way have been identified, and many countries are making good progress.  Nevertheless, close to 870 million people around the world remain undernourished and do not have access to a healthy diet.  It is time for everyone to take urgent action – in a concerted manner – and to elaborate a new development agenda around lasting concerns of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition.

The outcome of this e-consultation, together with the proposed CFS consultation, will feed into the high level experts consultation to be hosted by the Government of Spain in March 2013.

Ultimately, your contributions will feed into the UN General Assembly discussions beginning September 2013 for the elaboration of an agreed post 2015 global development agenda.

E-Consultation: next four weeks

Over the next four weeks, FAO and WFP will facilitate this e-consultation in drawing on the widest possible group of stakeholders and interested parties on how best to address hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition at all levels, and to seek your inputs on the elaboration of a new agenda for action beyond the current MDG framework.

We also invite you to submit papers, findings, or on-going work on the topic of hunger, food and nutrition security.

We seek your inputs on the following three themes:

Theme 1

(i) What do you see as the key lessons learned during the current Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Framework (1990-2015), in particular in relation to the MDGs of relevance to hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition? 

(ii) What do you consider the main challenges and opportunities towards achieving food and nutrition security in the coming years?

Theme 2

What works best?  Drawing on existing knowledge, please tell us how we should go about addressing the hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition challenges head on.  Provide us with your own experiences and insights.  For example, how important are questions of improved governance, rights-based approaches, accountability and political commitment in achieving food and nutrition security? 

Furthermore, how could we best draw upon current initiatives, including the Zero Hunger Challenge, launched by the UN Secretary General at the Rio+20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (www.zerohungerchallenge.org), and the Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition elaborated by the CFS?

Theme 3

For the Post-2015 Global Development Framework to be complete, global (and regional or national) objectives, targets and indicators will be identified towards tackling hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition.  A set of objectives has been put forward by the UN Secretary-General under Zero Hunger Challenge (ZHC):

  1. 100% access to adequate food all year round
  2. Zero stunted children less than 2 years old
  3. All food systems are sustainable
  4. 100% increase in smallholder productivity and income
  5. Zero loss or waste of food.

Please provide us with your feedback on the above list of objectives – or provide your own proposals.  Should some objectives be country-specific, or regional, rather than global? Should the objectives be time-bound?

 

Contribution received:

Bhavani R Vaidyanathan M S Swaminathan Research Foundation, India
8-12-2012

In addition to what I have already sent in (see here), additional points that need attention are:

  • Control of food price inflation and effective social protecton measures to shield the poor and vulnerable from it.
  • Investment in agriculture and agricultural infrastructure like irrigation
  • Giving a pro-nutrition focus to agriculture through an integrated crop-livestock farming system that is tailored to address the nutrition situation of the community on the ground
  • Regional initiatives like the proposed SAARC food bank in South Asia need to be operationalised.    
  • Attention to water conservation and recharge
  • Special focus on women and children

 

 

Ravinder Naik Vankudothu Agriculture University, India
8-12-2012

the commitment to achieve MDG s is encouraging but unless the issue of food security is solved one cannot find the other way out 

the possible ways could be 

1 to encourage the nutritional/kitchen garden in rural areas where they have low purchasing power and sizable area would be vacant.

2. to invest more in agriculture R&D so that research could be intensified in the  areas where it needs focus

3. to utilise the ICTs for reaching the rural areas where the need is more

4. crop specific need based management of the crops with the existing technology

4.beyond all these things the  scientific / agriculture research society should recongnise knowledge as additional fifth factor of production in addition to the existing factors of production 

 

 

 

See the attachment: MDGs.docx
Barack Ondanya Miriu Integrated Project, Kenya
7-12-2012

Dear Fellows,

 

Let me take it with great honour to thank you very much on the efforts you are laying to ensure that we live in A World We Want. Each and every time ,we have a dream to be in A World free from hunger and   diseases.

 

During the current MDGS' as in Theme 1, there are some lessons that I came to learn as I observe from within my country the situations pertaining hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition:

 

Most communities still go without food. For example, there is a lot of hunger in most regions of North Eastern Province, an area which is seriously affected by drought. Most families can’t afford even a meal a day as they survive majorly on donations and support from well wishers. Kenya is a country with varied climatic conditions hence can produce  food in some areas as some go without. Generally, hunger as  a disaster is still common among the communities in the world.

 

Food security  has also not been achieved in Kenya. In case of severe famine, Kenyans do face severe hunger as we still have poor systems of food conservation. There are common disasters, which tend to affect the famers hence destroy the productivity of the country. Floods and drought will always destroy crops within the fields hence lowering the harvests leading to severe hunger.

 

Due to high level of poverty within the country, most children die due to malnutrition. For example, in Turkana where in the recent past, some families were recorded as they feed on bitter fruits of which some were poisonous. Other communities were also feeding on cats after a long severe drought. These children die due to marasmus.

 

In general, food security and hunger have not been dealt with in the recent past according to the current MDG 1.

Sachin Kumar Jain Media for Rights, India
7-12-2012

Dear all,

 

Please find enclosed a document for discussion on various structural aspects of childhood hunger and malnutrition.

 

Sachin Kumar Jain

Econonist views on the go University of Guyana, Guyana
7-12-2012

Dear Moderator,

 

With regards to Theme 1:  Key to the success of any initiative is an integrated approach by all stakeholders.

 

 In Guyana - South America, while we have had some amount of success with the “Grow More Food Campaign”, we have learnt that if we are to contribute significantly to reducing hunger, and attaining food security, we must collaborate with other nations who are in pursuit of same. With that being said, I was pleased to learn that official from Trinidad and Tobago visited Guyana in November to discuss plan to establish a “food security facility” in Guyana. It is widely known that Guyana has the potential to produce food to supply the entire Caribbean; however, over the year we have been faced with some challenges. Just to highlight a few:

 

  • - low levels of technical personnel/skills necessary to develop the agricultural sector
  • - provide nutritious foods as affordable prices
  • - inability to cope effectively with climate change
  • - low levels of mechanisation in the agricultural sector
  •  

I would like to think that many developing countries are in a similar position, and thus, by joining forces with other nation, the MDGs can be achieved.

 

Thank you and best regards

Ajay Kumar VB RIGHTS, India
7-12-2012

It is important to evaluate MDG on the basis of government performances/  actual execution of the commitments they made . How far or in what extent the states are able to convert MDG to their own respective national policies, budgetary provisions and institutions.  Take examples of India the number of poor remain same (people living less than 2 dollar per days) for last decade and 50% India’s children’s are malnourished.  Is it possible prepare an international Index based on  3-4 parameters of MDG?      

Bhavani R Vaidyanathan M S Swaminathan Research Foundation, India
7-12-2012

Hunger, Food and Nutrition Security

Theme 1:
What do you see as the key lessons learned during the current Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Framework (1990-2015), in particular in relation to the MDGs of relevance to hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition?
What do you consider the main challenges and opportunities towards achieving food and nutrition security in the coming years?

•    The gap between intent and policy and practice is a major challenge to achieving the goals we set ourselves. In India for instance, a major challenge has been ensuring implementation and delivery of the food and nutrition security safety nets that are in place like the public distribution system, midday meal scheme and integrated child development services.
•    The policies of globalisation and opening up of markets from the last decade of the 20th century has impacted negatively on local level food security with commerce taking precedence over consumption!   
•    Shrinking of investment in agriculture has impacted on production and productivity and affected food availability. In India, the rate of growth of food grain production in the decade of the 1990s fell below the rate of growth of population and per capita availability of foodgrains has come down over the years!   
•    Access to safe drinking water, sanitation and affordable healthcare facilities for all is still not a reality in many developing countries and negatively impact on nutrition status. Investment by the state in these areas is again the main issue.   
•    Unless nutrition security is prioritised and made a national agenda and pursued seriously with commitment, the goal of food and nutrition security will remain a dream.   

Theme 2:
What works best? Drawing on existing knowledge, please tell us how we should go about addressing the hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition challenges head on.
Provide us with your own experiences and insights.  For example, how important are questions of improved governance, rights-based approaches, accountability and political commitment in achieving food and nutrition security?
Furthermore, how could we best draw upon current initiatives, including the Zero Hunger Challenge, launched by the UN Secretary General at the Rio+20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development (www.zerohungerchallenge.org), and the Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition elaborated by the CFS?

•    Generating awareness on entitlements among the community at large can be a major step forward. In India for instance, effective use of the Right to Information Act by people on utilisation of funds allocated for specific programmes has in many cases made a malfunctioning system work.
•    Media and ICT tools should be effectively used for generating awareness, so that more people start demanding their rights and entitlements and thereby contribute to effective delivery.
•    In India again, the public interest litigations on the right to food has led to a series of orders by the Supreme Court of India to make the public food delivery systems spruce up and deliver.
•    Improved governance is at the heart of effective implementation of state schemes for food and nutrition security. It can come only with political commitment to ending hunger (like the zero hunger programme of Brazil) and not just lip service.
•    Local level food security systems should be encouraged like for instance community foodgrain banks in tribal areas of India that provide support during periods of seasonal or transient hunger. Consumption of tubers and wild foods by indigenous communities is another practice of fostering local food security.     
•    Nutrition literacy drives in schools and at community forums addressing both men and women and training champions from the community to take the messages forward have an important role.  

For the Post-2015 Global Development Framework to be complete, global (and regional or national) objectives, targets and indicators will be identified towards tackling hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition.  A set of objectives has been put forward by the UN Secretary-General under Zero Hunger Challenge (ZHC):
a.    100% access to adequate food all year round
b.    Zero stunted children less than 2 years old
c.    All food systems are sustainable
d.    100% increase in smallholder productivity and income
e.    Zero loss or waste of food.
Please provide us with your feedback on the above list of objectives – or provide your own proposals.  Should some objectives be country-specific, or regional, rather than global? Should the objectives be time-bound?

a.    Has to be availability of adequate and safe food for a balanced diet
b.    100% access to safe drinking water, sanitation and healthcare facilities are crucial for addressing malnutrition.
c.    The majority of landholders in developing countries being small and marginal farmers, increasing their production and productivity definitely have to be the focus.    
d.    Zero loss or waste of food should encompass the entire gamut from the farmers’ field to post-harvest processing to consumption on the table.
e.    Effective postharvest technologies and infrastructure to ensure effective processing of surplus produce is very crucial both for improving farmers’ incomes and addressing loss due to spoilage.     
f.    Adaptation to climate change is important in the post 2015 global development framework.
g.    While the overall objectives can be generic, some objectives will of course have to be country-specific to address immediate priorities.

Bhavani
M S Swaminathan Research Foundation

Abubacker Siddick Syed Mohammed M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation, India
6-12-2012

Thematic Area 3:

 

Following Interventions focusing rural women with the objective of improving Household nutrition will help achieving ZHC

 

1. Establishing Home gardens in every home with a plan for nutritious veg/ greens

 

2. Creating awareness on Nutritious food and improved cooking methods using  available resources retaining nutritional values

 

3. Preparation and issuance of Food and Nutrition Entitlement Cards to each family and its follow up work.

 

Eusebio Melo Federación Nacional de Trabajadores de la Pesca Marino Mercante, ...
6-12-2012

Los gobierno deben de hacer programas al junto de todos los productores nacionales y poner a funcionar una maquinaria humana de tecnico a trabajar juntos a los agricultores y los productores agriculas para una mayor produccion.

 

Tambien se debe de pensar que en los años 80, se hablaba de la peste verde, que era de poner a producir los campos, pèro tambien, entendemos que se debe de hablar en estos momentos de la peste azul la cual significa mas politica estragicas de los gobiernos, sobre la crianza de pescados, a traves de estanques y represa.

 

Crear una capacitacion a nivel mundial y crear las falicidades de romper la barrera para su intercambio. 

Fred Ojok Grassroots Reconciliation Group, Uganda
6-12-2012

The MDG of reduction and eradication of hunger and through improvin household food security had been done well in some countires but some other countries almost failed because bad governace and acountability for some of the projects meant to improve agriculture infrastructural development