Font size:

Contact us:

Topic: Climate Change

Download resource

FAO, Forests and Climate Change

This publication summarizes the work that FAO is undertaking, with its partners, to assist countries to mitigate and adapt to climate change as it relates to forests, trees and the people who depend on them. It is organized in four of the five main areas of FAO’s integrated approach to SFM:

  • MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT
  •  MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND PRACTICES
  • POLICY AND GOVERNANCE
  • FOREST PRODUCTS, SERVICES AND INDUSTRY.

The fifth main area of work, INTERSECTORAL COOPERATION AND COORDINATION, cuts across the other four areas.

Download resource

TOWARDS THE FUTURE WE WANT End hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems

Improving agricultural and food systems is essential for a world with healthier people and healthier ecosystems. Healthy and productive lives cannot be achieved unless “all people at all times have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food which meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and
healthy life” (FAO, 1996). Healthy ecosystems must be resilient and productive, and provide the goods and services needed to meet current societal needs and desires without jeopardizing the options for future generations to benefit from the full range of goods and services provided by terrestrial, aquatic and marine ecosystems. There are very strong linkages between the conditions to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food  management. They intersect in agricultural and food systems at the global, national and local levels.

Download resource

Climate‐responsive Social Protection

In the years ahead, development efforts aiming at reducing vulnerability will increasingly have to factor in climate change, and social protection is no exception. This paper sets out the case for climate‐responsive social protection and proposes a framework with principles, design features, and functions that would help SP systems evolve in a climate‐responsive direction. The principles comprise climate‐aware planning; livelihood‐based pproaches that consider the full range of assets and institutions available to households and ommunities; and aiming for resilient ommunities by planning for the long term. Four design features that can help achieve this are: scalable and flexible programs that can ncrease coverage in response to climate isasters; climate‐responsive targeting systems; investments in livelihoods that build community and household resilience; and promotion of better climate risk management.

Download resource

A food security perspective to livestock and the environment

By C. Peter Timmer, FAO, 1997. The main premise of this essay is that an early escape from hunger is not primarily the result of private decisions in response to free-market forces. Improved food security stems directly from a set of government policies that integrate the food economy into a development strategy that seeks rapid economic growth with improved income distribution. With such policies, countries in East and Southeast Asia offer evidence that poor countries can escape from hunger in two decades or less, that is, in the space of a single generation.

30.05.2012