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Topic: Crisis

Agenda for Action for Addressing Food Insecurity in Protracted Crises

Agenda for Action for Addressing Food Insecurity in Protracted Crises

Protracted crises situations are those in which food insecurity and malnutrition are particularly severe, persistent and at scale.
This discussion seeks feedback on the zero draft of the Agenda for Action for Addressing Food Insecurity in Protracted Crises and will contribute to the preparation of the First Draft.

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What is the role of social relations and networks in household food security and nutrition?

What is the role of social relations and networks in household food security and nutrition?

The ability to access and consume nutritious food is to some extent an outcome of their membership and relationships with other members of society. This is especially true in times of crises. To identify and discuss success stories, challenges and way forward to achieving food and nutritional security, this discussion focuses on social relations and networks for food security and nutrition.

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From Repeated Crisis to Long Term Food Security

From Repeated Crisis to Long Term Food Security

Protracted crises, as described by the latest State of Food Insecurity - SOFI report, affect 22 countries worldwide and pose an ongoing and fundamental threat to both lives and livelihoods, from which recovery becomes progressively more difficult over time.
While many solutions are well known or have been at least partially adopted, there are evident barriers to effective programming that are worth investigating.
 

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07.12.2010 - 27.12.2010
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Russia’s restrictions on imports of agricultural and food products: An initial assessment

On 7 August 2014 Russia announced a ban on food imports from Western countries which, in an earlier move, had imposed sanctions on Russian business interests in connection with the crisis in eastern Ukraine. The prohibition was effective immediately, and will stay in place for one year, blocking all imports of affected products from the European Union, United States, Canada, Australia and Norway. The list published by the Russian government covers bovine meat, pig meat, processed meats, poultry, fish and other seafood, milk and milk products, vegetables, fruits and nuts1. The import ban came in the wake of other import restrictions imposed by Russia on agricultural and food products earlier this year. In January 2014, Russia banned all pork imports from the EU on the grounds of recorded cases of African swine fever in wild boars in border areas of Poland and Lithuania. Other prohibitions included a ban on dairy exports from the Netherlands, quoting sanitary reasons, and on exports of meat from Ukraine, referring to an inadequate level of monitoring of meat quality standards. At the end of July 2014 bans on milk and milk products from Ukraine and fruit from Moldova were introduced, all on SPS grounds. On 1 August 2014 fruits and vegetables from Poland had already been blocked from entering the Russian market on the basis of unacceptable levels of pesticide residues and nitrates.

Although the latest bans add to a long list of import restrictions already in place, the scope of the bans, involving a large range of products from the main exporters to the Russian market raised concerns that supplies of key commodities to the Russian market would be further constrained, with negative implications for Russian consumers across all income levels, at least in the short run. This note examines the importance of the affected imports for consumption in Russia and discusses factors which will influence the dynamics of supply and demand response to the ban