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Topic: Household Food Security

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Resilient Livelihoods: Disaster Risk Reduction for Food and Nutrition Security

Resilient Livelihoods is FAO’s interdisciplinary Framework Programme on Disaster Risk Reduction for Food and Nutrition Security. It provides strategic direction to FAO member countries and partners for the implementation of disaster risk reduction measures in agriculture, forestry and fisheries at local, national, regional and global levels.

Through its disaster risk reduction activities, FAO seeks to protect livelihoods from shocks, to make food production systems more resilient and more capable of absorbing the impact of, and recovering from, disruptive events.
This Framework Programme reflects the Hyogo Framework for Action and strives to assist member countries implement its five Priorities for Action for the agricultural sectors. It also responds to recent recommendations made on disaster risk reduction by the Committee on Agriculture, the Programme and Finance Committee, the Committee on World Food Security and the Committee on Fisheries.

It contributes to meeting the needs of member countries, as expressed in the Regional Areas of Priority Action and identified by FAO Regional Conferences held in 2010.

While the Framework Programme supports national government partners, the direct beneficiaries are smallholders in developing countries, including small-scale farmers, fishers, herders, foresters and the urban poor - particularly women - whose lives and livelihoods are threatened. Small-scale farmers represent 90 percent of the rural poor and make up the majority of the world's hungry population.

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Indonesia’s Modern Food Retail Sector: Interaction With Changing Food Consumption and Trade Patterns

Indonesia’s food market has changed in response to a changing and growing economy. The report examines changes in the food consumption pattern and measures the growth of modern food retail chains, packaged food purchases, and food imports in the world’s fourth-most-populous country. The evidence suggests that Indonesians are moving toward modern global purchasing and consumption patterns, but more slowly than in some comparable countries. Barriers to foreign and domestic commerce, affecting the development of modern food retail supply chains, are important constraints on food market change in Indonesia. Further change in Indonesia’s retail food sector will help determine future growth in imports, including from the United States.

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Familiy Nutrition Guide

This guide is for everyone who wants to improve the feeding and nutrition of families in developing countries. It is for you if you are a health worker, nutritionist, agricultural extension worker or any other kind of development worker. It is for you if you are a member of a community group or a mother or other caregiver who wants to know more about family feeding. It might also be useful to anyone training health staff and community workers.
If you do not have a basic knowledge of nutrition and feel uncomfortable dealing with some technical parts of the guide, we suggest that you team up with local professionals so they can give you help when you need it. The purpose of the guide is to: provide the information needed to prepare good, nutritious and safe meals and feed each member of the family well; motivate people to adopt healthy eating habits.
The guide is divided into 11 topics that cover basic nutrition, family food security, meal planning, food hygiene and the special feeding needs of children, women and men, and of old, sick and malnourished people. Each Topic is set out in the same way and has two parts: Nutrition notes and Sharing this information. The Nutrition notes summarizes up-to-date knowledge on each topic. These can be used to prepare: face-to-face education sessions with families and other community-level groups (including teachers, care workers, traditional health workers, etc.); nutrition education print materials (such as booklets, brochures, flyers, posters) or material for other media (such as radio talks); training materials for different levels of staff in different sectors who deal with family nutrition.

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The urban producer's resource book

A practical guide by FAO's "Food for the Cities" Project for working with Low Income Urban and Peri-Urban Producers Organizations. These guidelines set out the main problems and issues related to low income Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture (UPA). Suggestions are provided for each issue to show how UPA producers can work together and with other stakeholders for the benefit of all.
Improving the capabilities of producer groups and organizations can lead to higher incomes for producers, safer food production for the cities and an increased overall contribution of UPA to a better city environment.