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Topic: Policies and Strategies

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FSN Forum Brief - Forests and trees provide benefits for food security and nutrition – what is your say?

Brief based on the online discussion, held from 4 to 26 February 2013, facilitated by FAO’s Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition (FSN Forum) with FAO’s  Forestry Department in the context of the International Conference on Forests for Food Security and Nutrition.

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Policy brief: Improving wheat trade policy administration to benefit both consumers and producers in the United Republic of Tanzania

Import tariffs and costly import procedures may explain why consumers in the United Republic of Tanzania pay relatively high prices for wheat. Although wheat farmers benefit from higher prices, domestic production has not increased. Indeed, since 2000 domestic wheat production has been able to cover only about 20 per cent of the country’s consumption requirements.

 Findings from a recent study conducted by the Monitoring African Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP) project suggest that:

  • - simplifying procedures for importing wheat and reducing overall import costs would make wheat more affordable for consumers;
  • - monitoring re-exports of wheat flour to neighbouring countries would help ensure that lower import tariffs for wheat actually lead to lower domestic prices; and
  • - supporting efforts to develop wheat varieties adapted to local agro-ecological and climatic conditions, and expanding related extension services, are crucial for increasing wheat production.

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Policy Brief: Rethinking Mozambique’s cotton price fixing system to align producers’ prices with international prices

 

Although the government supports cotton farmers by regulating prices, cotton producers in Mozambique receive prices that are lower than international reference prices. Findings from a recent study conducted by the Monitoring African Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP) project show that the following measures would improve prices for producers:

- fostering competition along the entire cotton value chain, especially among processing companies (ginners);

- making processing more efficient to increase both the quantity and quality of outputs; 

- revising the domestic price fixing system to align producers’ prices with prices in international markets; and

- strengthening the market power of producers, relative to ginners, to improve transparency and equity in cotton market transactions.

26.04.2013
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Improving sugar cane processing in the United Republic of Tanzania to increase prices for farmers while lowering prices for consumers (MAFAP policy brief)

Currently sugar cane farmers in the United Republic of Tanzania receive lower prices than they could, despite high domestic demand, because of high processing costs. Tariffs on imported sugar keeps prices high for consumers without boosting prices for farmers. A new policy approach based on liberalized trade and increased competitiveness of sugar processing could lead to higher prices for producers and lower prices for consumers.

16.04.2013