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Topic: Policies and Strategies

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Climate-Responsive Social Protection

In the years ahead, development efforts aiming at reducing vulnerability will increasingly have to factor in climate change, and social protection is no exception. This paper sets out the case for
climate‐responsive social protection and proposes a framework with principles, design features, and functions that would help SP systems evolve in a climate‐responsive direction. The principles comprise climate‐aware planning; livelihood‐based approaches that consider the full range of assets and institutions available to households and communities; and aiming for resilient communities by planning for the long term. Four design features that can help achieve this are: scalable and flexible programs that can increase coverage in response to climate disasters; climate‐responsive targeting systems; investments in livelihoods that build community and household resilience; and promotion of better climate risk management

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Dominica National Export Strategy

The NES is a plan of action aimed at achieving the transformation of Dominica‟s export sector. Through this programme, the sector hopes to double its contribution to national income within the medium term, that is, from 2010 to 2014.
The strategy seeks to:

  • Create a more systematic and coordinated approach to export development by establishing a central export development management and execution framework, which includes procedures for monitoring outcomes. Such a framework would allow for enhanced synergies especially in promotion planning.
  • Undertake detailed value chain analysis to identify priority sectors with maximum potential.
  • Establish a documented policy and approach for developing exports of goods and services that have been identified to have maximum growth potential.
  • Position Dominica to respond effectively to adverse changes in the international economic environment exacerbated by trade liberalization and the erosion of preferential trade regimes.

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Good Practices in Building Innovative Rural Institutions to Increase Food Security

Continued population growth, urbanization and rising incomes are likely to continue to put pressure on food demand. International prices for most agricultural commodities are set to remain at 2010 levels or higher, at least for the next decade (OECD-FAO, 2010). Small-scale producers in many developing countries were not able to reap the benefits of high food prices during the 2007-2008 food price crises. Yet, this upward food price trend could have been an opportunity for them to increase their incomes and food security. The opportunity that high food prices could have provided as a pathway out of poverty for small producers was not realized.
Evidence from the ground shows that when strong rural organizations such as producer groups and cooperatives provide a full range of services to small producers, they are able to play a greater role in meeting a growing food demand on local, national and international markets. Indeed, a myriad of such institutional innovations from around the world are documented in this FAO case-study-based publication. Nevertheless, to be able to provide a broad array of services to their members, organizations have to develop a dense network of relationships among small producers, between small-producer organizations and with markets actors and policy-makers.

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Colonisation for the food: What lies beneath?

Today, the world’s natural resources are under increasing pressure and are often the object of important power struggles between corporations, states and communities. National governments and international institutions are responsible for shaping the environment in which these different interests operate. Growing foreign investments in land, water and other natural resources are found weakening developing countries’ capacity to regulate their food, land and water sectors. The international investment legal framework prioritizes the protection of investor rights over almost any other consideration. In this situation when nether the state machinery, nor the legal norms, nor the international actors are found supporting the world’s poor, can judiciary deliver the justice? This paper finds out what is viability of litigation for redressing situation of hunger and food insecurity.