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Topic: Right to Food

“Latifundia” and foreign ownership of land

by Annalisa Melandri

“Latifundia” (very large land properties) and foreign ownership of land are two threats to food security. How do International Organizations approach the subject and what measures can be taken?

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Summary of the Online Discussion on Rights-based Approaches to Food Security in Protracted Crises

From 22 October 2013 to 20 November 2013, the Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition (FSN Forum) hosted the fourth e-discussion of the Community of Practice on Food Insecurity on Protracted Crises. This e-discussion focused on “rights-based approaches to food security in protracted crises,” soliciting the participation of the worldwide FSN Forum community of experts and practitioners. The outcomes will feed into the drafting process of an Agenda for Action for Addressing Food Insecurity in Protracted Crises.

16.01.2014
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Final study of the Human Rights Council Advisory Committee on rural women and the right to food

The present study examines the right to food of rural women by underlining the
international legal framework applicable to rural women, analysing the patterns of
discrimination harming them, proposing strategies and policies for their legal protection and emphasizing good practices. The study has a special focus on female-headed households and temporary or seasonal workers.

26.02.2013
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The Fome Zero (Zero Hunger) Program: The Brazilian experience

By: José Graziano da Silva; Mauro Eduardo Del Grossi; Caio Galvão de França.

The launching of the “Zero Hunger Project – a proposal for a food security policy for Brazil” in October 2001 by the then candidate for the presidency Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva reflected the maturing of discussions and proposals on food security and fighting hunger, which became national priorities to be addressed through planned and decisive actions of the State with social participation. With the electoral victory of President Lula in 2003, the Zero Hunger project became the main governmental strategy guiding economic and social policies in Brazil and marked the beginning of an inflection that left behind an old dichotomy between them. Actions began to be taken to integrate structural policies into emergency policies to fight hunger and poverty. New, differentiated policies for family farming were implemented and basic legislation was built for the national food and nutrition security policy. This book is part of the NEAD Debate Series (Série NEAD Debate) and it presents some fundamental texts for one to understand the Brazilian experience with the Zero Hunger Program at different moments of its implementation over an eight-year period as a Government Program, bringing together reflections on different aspects of the process, such as the mobilization of different segments of society around it, the role of family farming, advances and challenges, among others.