Font size:

Contact us:

Topic: Training Material

Download resource

Guidelines for developing national plans of action for nutrition

A book by AGN, FAO , 1994. Available in English and Spanish. At the invitation of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), an international group of experts in nutrition, public health, food science and technology gathered in Rome from 19-26 October 1993 to consider the latest scientific evidence about dietary fats and oils. The experts attending the consultation discussed the many crucial and varied roles that dietary fats and oils play in human nutrition. They considered the intakes of different types and levels of dietary fats and oils and their associated health effects. They reviewed many of the technical factors associated with the production, processing, marketing and utilization of fats and oils. Finally, a series of recommendations about dietary fats and oils were made to assist policy makers, health-care specialists, the food industry, and consumers. This "Joint FAO/WHO expert consultation on fats and oils in human nutrition" was part of a continuing series of meetings on nutritionrelated topics which are sponsored by FAO and WHO. This consultation was the second such meeting to have been held on fats and oils; the first was held in 1977. This report of the meeting includes a discussion of the issues and evidence considered, the conclusions and recommendations of the group and a bibliography. A wide range of topics was reviewed by the experts and this is reflected in the report. This report includes chapters on the following topics: the composition of dietary fat; aspects of fat digestion and metabolism; global trends in the availability of edible fats and oils; processing and refining edible oils; selected uses of fats and oils in food; lipids in early development; health, obesity and energy values; coronary heart disease and lipoproteins; isomeric fatty acids; cancer and dietary fat; dietary fat and immune response; dietary fat, hypertension and stroke; nonglyceride components of fats; and nutrition labelling. Since efforts to address one aspect of diet-health relationships can affect other aspects as well, care needs to be taken not to over-emphasize any single issue to the detriment of others. The recommendations, therefore, reflect a synthesis and weighing of various concerns. It should be noted that the evidence related to the different topics varies considerably. Until more scientific information accumulates and the understanding of the complex metabolic interactions that determine nutritional and health status increases, it will not be possible to reach full agreement on each topic. This is a dilemma which is reflected in the nature of the conclusions and recommendations that emerged from the consultation. The final conclusions and recommendations are provided in this chapter, preceded by a brief note identifying key issues. We encourage readers to examine the chapters of the report for more detailed information about the topics considered and for insights into the deliberations leading to the general conclusions and recommendations of the consultation.

Download resource

The One to Watch - Radio, New ICTs and Interactivity

This book grew out of a FAO workshop organised in February 2001 entitled Information and Communication Technologies Servicing Rural Radio: New Contents, New Partnerships. It focuses on the use of the Internet by radio stations in their efforts to support initiatives for democratic and sustainable development and it includes insights and experiences from all parts of the globe.

30.05.2012
Download resource

Human Rights Translated - A Business Reference Guide

The purpose of this publication by MONASH University an UNHCHR is to contribute to this process of clarification by explaining universally recognised human rights in a way that makes sense to business.

24.02.2012
Download resource

Food Security Communications Toolkit from FAO

An old saying goes, “It’s not what you say, but how you say it, that matters.” Indeed, food security professionals increasingly realize that they must communicate their knowledge strategically for their work to have maximum impact. A comprehensive food security communications toolkit from FAO will help make sure “information leads to action” by offering tips on: • communicating strategically with policy makers – for maximum impact • dealing with the media and building good relationships with journalists • how to prepare a communication strategy • exploiting the internet, social media and Web 2.0 technologies to deliver your message and engage in dialogues with global audiences • writing policy briefs, early warning bulletins, needs assessment and research reports • improving your writing skills and editing your work TARGET AUDIENCE While aimed at professionals working in food security related fields, the lessons in this toolkit can easily be applied to many other fields.

24.02.2012