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Country Briefs

  Brazil

Reference Date: 31-January-2017

HIGHLIGHTS

  1. Planting of 2017 “de safrihna” crop delayed by excess precipitations

  2. Cereal imports for 2016/17 marketing year forecast at high level

  3. Prices for most cereals decline reflecting high import levels, rice prices remain high

Planting of 2017 “de safrihna” crop delayed by excess precipitations

Planting of the first season “de safrinha” 2017 maize crop is well advanced in the central and southern regions of the country. Some uncertainty exists about planting levels, particularly in the main producer State of Mato Grosso do Sul, as excess precipitations in early January have delayed planting operations. However, early expectations are for increased plantings over last year’s reduced level reflecting the high price levels and improved weather conditions over the dry weather of 2016.

Total cereal production in 2016 has been estimated at about 83 000 tonnes, its lowest level in five years. Prolonged and severe dry weather significantly affected maize plantings and yields. While the wheat output increased, the quality of wheat grains were very low increasing the need of imports.

Cereal imports for 2016/17 marketing year forecast at high level

Cereal imports in the 2016/17 marketing year (March/February) are anticipated close to 10.3 million tonnes, a record level. This mainly reflects an expected increase in maize imports, which are forecast at 2 million tonnes. The reduced 2016 maize output and the strong demand from the feed sector have led the Government to authorize maize imports from outside the MERCOSUR area at a zero tariff rate. Wheat imports are anticipated to reach 7 million tonnes, its highest levels since 2012, reflecting the low quality of the 2016 wheat grains.

Prices for most cereals decline reflecting high import levels, rice prices remain high

Prices of yellow maize declined some 3 percent in January as imports continue to supply the markets and were 4 percent below their level from a year earlier. Wheat and wheat (flour) prices were declining in January, pressured by the availability of the recently-harvested crops and large import volumes, prices were on average 10 percent below their year-earlier levels. Rice prices declined more than 1 percent in January, but were more than 25 percent above their level from a year earlier, as seasonal trends were strengthen by the reduced 2016 crops.