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Kyrgyzstan PDF version    Email this article Print this article Subscribe FAO GIEWS RSS  Share this article  

Reference Date: 14-December-2012

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. The planting of winter crops has been completed and the planted area has increased slightly

  2. Crop production in 2012 was significantly reduced due to unfavourable weather conditions

  3. About half of all food consumed domestically comes from imports

  4. The prices of staple products increased to record levels

The planting of winter crops has been completed and the planted area has increased slightly

Despite a very slow start, the sowing of winter crops has now been completed. Moreover, the planted area has increased by about 5 percent. During the planting season there was shortage of seeds and the Russian Federation supplied around 20 000 tonnes of seed as humanitarian aid.

Crop production in 2012 was significantly reduced due to unfavourable weather conditions

Due to unfavourable weather conditions – specifically high temperatures combined with below-average precipitation during spring and summer months – the country’s annual cereal output fell significantly (by 17 percent). The largest decrease – by almost one third – was in wheat. Preliminary official estimates of total cereal production in 2012 are put at 1.3 million tonnes, half of which is wheat. Total production is 18 percent below the five-year-average and wheat production is 30 percent lower. Also, yields declined by 15 and 25 percent respectively. Maize production is estimated to be close to last year’s levels or about 450 000 tonnes.

About half of all food consumed domestically comes from imports

The country needs to import a significant volume of wheat to satisfy domestic consumption demands. Cereal import requirements are estimated at around 50 percent of food consumption in the 2012/13 marketing year (July/June) or 465 000. This is down by 28 percent compared to last year. To stabilize the food supply situation, the Kyrgyzstani authorities have increased stock levels since 2009, following a bumper harvest.

The prices of staple products increased to record levels

Wheat flour prices in November remained around their record October levels, strengthening on some markets but weakening others following the release of stocks from state reserves. The high prices reflect the reduced 2012 wheat output and high values in the regional export markets, as the country imports about one-third of is consumption requirements on average. In order to ease price increases, the Government signed an agreement with the Russian Federation in mid-November to import 100 000 tonnes of wheat on a concessional basis to be delivered by the end of 2012.









Relevant links:
From GIEWS:
 As of Jul 2014, included in the list of "Countries Requiring External Assistance for Food"
 Food Price Data and Analysis Tool
 Earth Observation Indicators
 Maps
 Seasonal Indicators
 Vegetation Indicators
 Precipitation Indicators
 Graphs & Data
 NDVI & Precipitation
 Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) Reports & Special Alerts: 2010
From FAO:
 FAO Country Profiles

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