GIEWS Country Briefs

Republic of Moldova PDF version    Email this article Print this article Subscribe FAO GIEWS RSS  Share this article  

Reference Date: 10-April-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Early forecast of winter crops for cereal production in 2014 is largely favourable

  2. Cereal production in 2013 recovered after drought induced reduction in 2012

  3. Although wheat flour prices increased slightly, the worst impact of the drought is on rural farmers

Early forecast of winter crops for cereal production in 2014 is largely favourable

Plating of winter crops has been completed in November last year. Winter crops account on average for about 40 percent of the total cereal production. By official information the planting area under cereals is around 390 000 hectares, including 300 000 hectares of wheat (25 000 hectares less than last year), 58 000 hectares of barley (8 000 hectares more than in 2013 and 31 000 hectares rape (compared to 25 000 hectares last year). Reports indicate that about 90 percent of the crops are in good and fair condition. Wheat production is expected at 1 million tonnes, some 10 percent below last year.

Cereal production in 2013 recovered from drought stricken levels in 2012

In 2013, the cereal harvest of the Republic of Moldova reached about 3 million tonnes, a recovery from the previous year’s reduced output due to very poor weather conditions in particular hot temperature and drought in the summer when around 90 percent of the country’s farmland had been declared affected by drought.

Wheat imports in 2013/14 (July/June) to remain stable

As a result of a recovery in cereal production, in particular wheat, last year, import requirements are expected to remain stable at 90 000 tonnes. Carryover stocks are recovering following their depletion in 2012 owing to a production deficit.

Although wheat flour prices increased slightly, the worst impact of the drought is on rural farmers

In spite of the sharply reduced 2012 cereal production, retail prices of wheat flour increased moderately on a yearly basis mainly due to state price regulation and interventions. The worst impact of the drought is on rural farmers, in particular fodder availability and animal conditions, mainly in central and southern areas. Since around 90 percent of the livestock is owned by small farmers, it is one of the key components of rural households’ food security, providing nutrition and cash income. The negative impact of fodder shortages was somehow offset by Government measures to rural farmers including the provision of agricultural inputs - such as seeds and fertilizers - to the affected vulnerable population. The country has also received assistance from the international community to support its agricultural rehabilitation efforts.









Relevant links:
From GIEWS:
 Food Price Data and Analysis Tool
 Earth Observation Indicators
 Maps
 Seasonal Indicators
 Vegetation Indicators
 Precipitation Indicators
 Graphs & Data
 NDVI & Precipitation
 Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) Reports & Special Alerts: 2007, 2003
From FAO:
 FAO Country Profiles

Email this article Print     Subscribe FAO GIEWS RSS Subscribe GIEWS RSS Share this article  Share it

GIEWS   global information and early warning system on food and agriculture