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Country Briefs

  Mexico

Reference Date: 06-June-2017

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Favourable prospects for 2017 cereal production

  2. Cereal imports in 2016/17 marketing year unchanged from previous year

  3. Prices of black beans continued to increase in May, maize prices stable

Favourable prospects for 2017 cereal production

The harvest of the 2017 autumn/winter maize and wheat is underway, while planting of the 2017 spring/summer maize and wheat crops is well advanced. Reduced plantings in the autumn/winter wheat crop are anticipated to be offset by higher yields and greater plantings for the spring/summer crop. Early prospects are favourable for the 2017 wheat crop that is forecast at about 4 million tonnes, virtually unchanged from last year’s above average level. The 2017 maize crop (autumn/winter and spring/summer) is anticipated to reach some 28 million tonnes, a bumper crop, reflecting above average sowings, favoured by relatively normal precipitation levels, and anticipated higher yields. Assuming normal weather conditions during the ongoing spring/summer season, FAO’s first forecast for the country’s 2017 overall cereal production points to a record output of 38 million tonnes.

Cereal imports in 2016/17 marketing year unchanged from previous year

Cereal imports in the 2016/17 marketing year (October/September) are anticipated to reach 20.8 million tonnes, virtually unchanged from last year, but well above the average. High maize imports for feed, which are expected to cover one-third of the domestic utilization, helped to maintain cereal imports well above average levels.

Prices of black beans continued to increase in May, maize prices stable

Prices of black beans continued in May their increasing trend of the previous months. The reduced 2016/17 harvests and increased production costs kept prices of black beans some 27 percent higher than in April last year. By contrast, maize prices were generally stable during the month of May, but were well above their levels from a year earlier supported by high fuel prices and increased production costs.